Information

Norah Briscoe

Norah Briscoe


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Norah Davies was born in Wallasey in 1899. Her father, Adolf Davies, was an accountant who worked for Lever Brothers. Her mother, Catherine Dodwell Davies, was an Irish Catholic nurse. "The Davies family home was 213 Seaview Road, Wallasey, near Liverpool. It was a respectable Victorian villa: three storeys with bay windows, and an attic that would later house the maid." (1)

A second child, Hilda, was born the following year. In 1902 triplets were born. Unable to cope with five children under three, Norah was sent to live with Adolf's two unmarried sisters. (2) in 1908 she was sent to be educated at the Lingdale House Convent.

After leaving school she found work in an insurance office. However, she really wanted a career in journalism and eventually found work with the Liverpool Echo: "The throb of the machines and smell of printers' ink, the sounds and sights of nocturnal activity when ordinary folk were getting into their carpet slippers; the nonchalant manner of the commissionaire who directed me upstairs; the disorder discovered there when I opened the door of a paper-cluttered room, took me, as I thought, to the heart of Bohemia, to which I by rights belonged." (3)

In 1925 she joined the staff of the Croydon Advertiser. She also wrote freelance articles for the Birmingham Mail and contributed short stories for various woman's magazines. Her writing career came to a halt when she married Reginald Briscoe, a clerk at the Ministry of Works, in 1929. (4)

A son, Paul Briscoe, was born in Streatham on 12th July 1930. Reginald Briscoe died in 1932, following an emergency operation for appendicitis, "leaving a widow who was bitter that he had not taken out life insurance, and resentful that she was encumbered with a son, for whom she felt no affection". (5)

Norah Briscoe was determined to resume her career as a journalist and employed a nanny to look after Paul: "Beatrice was large, round and deaf, and she spoiled me utterly". More importantly, Beatrice provided him with "the affection, the hugs and kisses his mother refused him". (6)

In 1934 Norah Briscoe took a holiday in Nazi Germany. She later wrote in her unpublished autobiography: "We seemed to have found in that other land of mountains and streams and towering forests, a corner of the world as remote from war and evil as was possible... You could pray, dance, drink, smoke, and worship as you pleased. Young men in leather breeches leaped over flames on Midsummer Night in a pagan ritual and heard Mass next day. You could follow any creed you liked - provided you followed the Führer, too. And whose business was that but their own?" (7)

On his mother's return to England she joined the PR department of Unilever. One of the tasks she was given was to collect all references to Sir Oswald Mosley, the leader of the National Union of Fascists, that had appeared in all the newspapers owned by Lord Rothermere. She later learned that the cuttings had been requested by some Jewish directors of Unilever. (8)

Norah Briscoe discovered several articles that supported Mosley including an article by Rothermere in The Daily Mail in which he praised Mosley for his "sound, commonsense, Conservative doctrine". Rothermere added: "Timid alarmists all this week have been whimpering that the rapid growth in numbers of the British Blackshirts is preparing the way for a system of rulership by means of steel whips and concentration camps. Very few of these panic-mongers have any personal knowledge of the countries that are already under Blackshirt government. The notion that a permanent reign of terror exists there has been evolved entirely from their own morbid imaginations, fed by sensational propaganda from opponents of the party now in power. As a purely British organization, the Blackshirts will respect those principles of tolerance which are traditional in British politics. They have no prejudice either of class or race. Their recruits are drawn from all social grades and every political party. Young men may join the British Union of Fascists by writing to the Headquarters, King's Road, Chelsea, London, S.W." (9)

Norah Briscoe also found articles that supported Adolf Hitler. As a result of this investigation "Jewish directors of Unilever... decided to present Harmsworth's owner, Lord Rothermere, with an ultimatum: if he did not stop backing Mosley, they and their friends would stop placing advertisements in his papers. Rothermere gave in." However, as Paul pointed out, her investigation involved her "reading almost everything favourable that had been written recently about Mosley and his Blackshirts. What she read, she liked." Norah handed in her notice at Uniliver and decided to become a pro-fascist freelance journalist.

In 1935 Norah Briscoe introduced Paul Briscoe to Joseph Weyrich (Seppl). "I saw him as an intruder and took an instant dislike to him. I resented this tall, dapper man with a studied smile and big eyes framed by round, black spectacles. I had been used to being the centre of attention and getting my own way... Mother announced that Seppl had invited us to come to Germany, and Seppl told me he would soon make a man of me." (10) Over the next eighteen months they spent living out of a suitcase. (11)

While in Nazi Germany Norah met Molly Hiscox, "a pretty woman in her late twenties who organised German holidays for English Fascist sympathisers". They soon became very close friends. "Neither of us liked the unfair anti-German talk that was increasing in intensity in England... True, Austen Chamberlain had just returned from a visit to announce that Germany was 'one vast arsenal'. What of it? Must they not take proper precautions to protect themselves? But weren't the majority of its inhabitants - and Molly travelled widely in Germany and saw them for herself - enjoying life as they hadn't enjoyed it for many years, with good roads to drive on in their cheap and well made little cars, a freedom from industrial troubles, a decrease in violence, a return to sanity and security, in fact? They were borne on an upsurge of hope and confidence, freed from the long, lingering misery of defeat, we agreed... In the meantime, we listened to the tramp of marching soldiers in the streets at intervals, and found their triumphant songs and happy faces immensely heartening. Here was real joy through strength. We heard no menace in them, nor in the mock air-raids and blacked-out rehearsals that occasionally occurred. The Germans were realists." (12)

In the summer of 1936 Norah returned to England and left Paul with Seppl's family in Miltenberg. (13) Now aged six, Paul attended the local primary school. "Oma had kitted me out in lederhosen, bright braces and stout boots. With my shock of snow-blond hair, I made a convincing little Bavarian - until of course, I opened my mouth to speak... At half-past seven one soft September morning, Oma took me by the hand and led me across the Martplatz and down the lane to the Volksschule. When she left me at the door, I felt physically sick." (14)

On her return to London, Norah Briscoe went to live with Molly Hiscox at 50 Thornton Road, Streatham. Molly introduced Norah to her lover, Richard (Jock) Houston. According to Paul Briscoe: "Mother immediately fell under his spell. The fascination wasn't sexual, it was political. Jock, then aged 31, was a fanatical admirer of Hitler and a frenzied activist who fizzed with energy. Fast-talking, short-fused and histrionic, he was a house painter who had - as he frequently reminded people - pulled himself out of the gutter by his bootstraps. But if truth be told, he hadn't pulled himself very far. He was never more at home than when he was standing on an East End pavement on a soapbox, ranting at a crowd in the odd accent of a cockney who had spent much of his life in Glasgow. One of his techniques was to upturn a box on a busy corner and begin a speech to a one-man crowd that was in on the trick. The stooge would heckle, and the dialogue would descend into a shouting match; a crowd would gather, and Jock would have an audience."

Nora found his message appealing: "Jack told them what he told anyone who would listen: that he, they, and the nation were being kept down by an international conspiracy of Jews. The unemployed were told that the money that should be creating work for them was being hoarded by Jewish financiers, and that their jobs would be stolen from them by Jews from the only country that was dealing with the Jewish menace, Hitler's Germany... The analysis was crude, hateful and false - but Mother embraced it uncritically. It explained her own failure to flourish: the world had refused to acknowledge her as special because the world was controlled by an elite to which she could never belong. Mother was one of many to find the theory of fascism credible and seductive. It offered dignity to the disappointed, allowing them to see themselves as wronged rather than unlucky or inadequate. Hitler sold these ideas to a Germany that had been humiliated in the recent war; Jock, and others like him, peddled them to Englishmen robbed of jobs and self-respect in the subsequent peace." (15)

Nora Briscoe now became a supporter of Sir Oswald Mosley and the British Union of Fascists. Her son later wrote that "The fascist cause became an obsession. She talked of little else. The Jews were parasites conspiring to destroy western civilisation and engineering a war that had to be stopped... Mother had found a flag that offered her the recognition she felt was hers by right and which had been denied her by her family and by society." (16)

During this period Nora became friends with Dr Leigh Vaughan-Henry, the head of the National Citizens' Union. "Mother formed a particular admiration for Vaughan-Henry, who was the most educated and urbane person she had ever met. Eloquent and softly spoken in German, French and Italian as well as English, he was a poet and a composer, though his poems and compositions had brought him little recognition or fame... Like Mother, he saw himself as a frustrated artist. Fascism gave him a voice. He wrote about national culture for The Blackshirt and gave talks about music on German radio." (17)

In 1939 Vaughan-Henry wrote to Emil Van Loo, a leading fascist in the Netherlands: "This is to introduce you to a journalist friend and author, Mrs Briscoe... I think this would be a good opportunity for her to discuss with you your New Economic Order movement in Holland, especially as she is politically well-informed and ties up her interests in contemporary international matters to that in cultural developments, seen as components of the social and political whole. She is quite Jew-wise and aware of much of the machinations which are worked by international finance. You may find her views proceed further in the direction of totalitarianism than your own, as do my own ideas, as you are well aware." (18)

In April 1940 Leigh Henry was fined and bound over to keep the peace for six months. The charge was "using insulting words whereby a breach of the peace was likely" and the words in question were "disgusting and unbridled language against the Jews". He was described at the time as being "rabidly pro-Nazi and anti-Semitic".

Norah Briscoe and Molly Hiscox both became involved in the secret Right Club. It was established by Archibald Ramsay, the Conservative MP for Peebles and Southern Midlothian, in May 1939. The Daily Worker described Ramsay "Britain's Number One Jew Baiter". (19) This was an attempt to unify all the different right-wing groups in Britain. Or in the leader's words of "co-ordinating the work of all the patriotic societies". In his autobiography, The Nameless War, Ramsay argued: "The main object of the Right Club was to oppose and expose the activities of Organized Jewry, in the light of the evidence which came into my possession in 1938. Our first objective was to clear the Conservative Party of Jewish influence, and the character of our membership and meetings were strictly in keeping with this objective."(20)

Norah Briscoe, like other members of the Right Club, was opposed to going to war with Nazi Germany. Apparently, she booed Winston Churchill whenever he appeared on the cinema newsreels and started loud anti-war conversations in pubs. (21)

Unknown to Ramsay and Briscoe, MI5 agents had infiltrated the Right Club. This included three women, Joan Miller, Marjorie Amor and Helem de Munck. The British government was therefore kept fully informed about the activities of Ramsay and his right-wing friends. Soon after the outbreak of the Second World War the government passed a Defence Regulation Order. This legislation gave the Home Secretary the right to imprison without trial anybody he believed likely to "endanger the safety of the realm" On 22nd September, 1939, Oliver C. Gilbert and Victor Rowe, became the first members of the Right Club to be arrested. In the House of Commons Ramsay attacked this legislation and on 14th December, 1939, asked: "Is this not the first time for a very long time in British history, that British born subjects have been denied every facility for justice?" (22)

Anna Wolkoff, a member of the Right Club, and Tyler Kent, a cypher clerk from the American Embassy, were arrested and charged under the Official Secrets Act. The trial took place in secret and on 7th November 1940, Wolkoff was sentenced to ten years. Kent, because he was an American citizen, was treated less harshly and received only seven years. Archibald Ramsay was surprisingly not charged with spying. Instead he was interned under Defence Regulation 18B. (23)

The New York Times reported: "Here was a man who was known to a wide circle of friends, many of whom seemed to be no better than himself, to be grossly disloyal to this country, and to be an associate, as he was, of thieves and felons now convicted. Captain Ramsay's whole picture of himself was of a loyal British gentleman, with sons in the Army, doing his best to help this country to win a victory in her life-and-death struggle. Captain Ramsay was, however, a man of no character and no reputation, and was perhaps very lucky only to be detained under the Defence Regulations." (24)

Norah Bruce was brought to the attention of the police when they received an anonymous letter: "Please investigate the right of a certain Mrs Briscoe to be in the Ministry of Information office. The woman has always been a Nazi propagandist, has a large circle of German friends and is to the best of my knowledge married to a German. She has a son by her first husband being educated as a German in Germany. I'm sorry I cannot sign my name as I'm afraid she may do some harm to my friends." (25)

This information was passed on to MI5. They kept a close watch on her activities. On 20th January 1941, Norah took a job as a typist in the Ministry of Supply. On 19th February she was promoted to the Central Priority Department. Most of its work was confidential and much of it secret. (26) Norah was now typing up sensitive documents about submarine bases and the shortage of spare parts. Apparently, she told a friend, "I get sight of such important official documents. When I come across a really hot one, I make a carbon copy and keep it in a folder in my desk." (27)

Norah joined forces with Molly Hiscox to get these documents to Nazi Germany. Molly put her in touch with one of her associates at the Right Club, a man in his twenties who was known to her as John. It has been suggested that this man was really Ferdinand Mayer-Horckel, a German-Jewish refugee. He in turn introduced her to a man named Harald Kurtz. Both men were in fact MI5 agents. (28)

Guy Liddell, director of counter-espionage at MI5, wrote in his diary that he had a meeting with Major Charles Maxwell Knight, head of counter-subversion unit B5(b): "The Norah Briscoe case is developing. M (Charles Maxwell Knight) is introducing a German agent and there is to be a meeting when he will get the documents. This case was first brought to my notice on Saturday. One of M's agents was asked to tea with Molly Hiscox, where he met Norah Briscoe, who is the wife or mistress of Jock Houston, the interned member of the BUF Briscoe said that she was working in quite an important section of the Ministry of Supply and that she had been copying all documents which she thought would be of interest. She is of German origin and has a son who is being brought up in Germany. She is now looking for some means of getting the documents through to the Germans." (29)

At meeting was arranged at a flat in Chelsea, Norah Briscoe handed over to Kurtz a collection of secret documents from the Ministry of Supply. Maxwell Knight and two members of Special Branch were in the next room and a few moments later they arrested the two women. (30) Briscoe and Hiscox appeared before the magistrate on 17th March 1941 on charges under the Treachery Act (1940). They were convicted and sentenced to five years penal servitude at the Central Criminal Court on 16th June 1941. (31)

After the case Liddell recorded in his diary: "Lunched with M. He told me all about the Briscoe case and showed me the documents. They are voluminous and cover a wide field. If the information had leaked it would certainly be a very serious matter. They relate to the location of factories, shortage of materials, establishment of submarine bases in Northern Ireland, etc. (32)

Norah Briscoe was released from Holloway Prison in the summer of 1945. At the end of the Second World War the occupying British Army made contact with the 15 year-old Paul Briscoe. In October 1945 he was told that he had half an hour to pack: he was going "home" to a country "whose language he had long forgotten and to a mother he had not heard from for four years". (33) At first he refused to go: "I thought of Hildegard as my mother, and with Seppl gone, it was my duty to look after her." (34)

Paul went to stay with Norah who was living with Molly Hiscox and Richard Houston in South Norwood. "I never met anyone so full of himself... Mother and Molly were obviously in awe of him... I felt no affection for the Mother that had reclaimed me, but I could see that she was genuinely proud of me. I was grateful for that." (35)

In 1946 Norah began working for John Middleton Murry, the literary critic and editor of the pacifist journal. Norah and Paul went to live with Murry at Lodge Farm, Thelnetham, Suffolk. (36) Paul enjoyed his time with Murry on his commune but his mother decided to leave in 1947 to take up a new post as assistant matron in a Land Army hostel. "It was strange how difficult we renegades found it to confront the mild, gentle man, and the puzzled, sadly accusing eyes, to tell him the unpalatable truth: that his free society felt remarkably like a prison to us, from which we must escape or die." (37)

In 1948 Norah Briscoe's novel, No Complaints in Hell was published. The book, which was based about her experiences in prison, It received mixed reviews: "Most praised its realistic description of prison life, but described the characterisation as functional and flat." Paul believed that the novel was deeply flawed because although she "was beginning to understand other people, she had not yet learned to understand herself." (38)

Paul Briscoe become a pacifist. However, his attempt to plea conscientious objection in 1949 was rejected and had to do his National Service. (39) He was sent to Germany where his knowledge of the language was put to good use: "I was assigned to Field Security, put in civilian clothes and sent to listen in on political meetings. I wasn't any better at spying than Mother. I was identified as a foreigner at a gathering of old Party comrades in Bad Harzburg and was lucky to get away before I was lynched. The same thing happened at a Communist rally in Hamburg, when I was rescued by being bundled into a jeep by the Military Police." (40)

After demobilisation he repaired historic buildings for the Ministry of Works. In 1956 he married Monica Larter, an infant schoolteacher. Inspired by his wife's profession he did a two-year teacher training course and in 1960 he began teaching woodwork in a secondary modern school in Essex. He later taught German in a schools in Suffolk. (41)

Monica gave birth two children, Catherine and Robert. Norah Briscoe, who was now suffering from Bell's Palsy, moved in with the family. "She stayed with us for the last thirty years of her life, living contentedly on the edge of our family and social circles, becoming known and liked as a spirited, independent-minded character who travelled the countryside on her bicycle until well into her eighties. She loved telling our children and our visitors stories of her life and adventures, but she never spoke of her crime or its punishment, and she fell silent whenever anyone mentioned the war." (42)

In 1993 Norah Briscoe suffered a series of minor strokes that left her needing constant nursing care and was placed in a home near Saxmundham: "Monica and I visited her almost daily,but visits were difficult: she suffered frequent hallucinations, and would talk about strange things that only she could see... After a few months of this, she had another stroke that robbed her of the power of speech. At first, she was distressed and frustrated, but after only a few days, she seemed to accept her condition and put up with it bravely." (43)

The throb of the machines and smell of printers' ink, the sounds and sights of nocturnal activity when ordinary folk were getting into their carpet slippers; the nonchalent manner of the commissionaire who directed me upstairs; the disorder discovered there when I opened the door of a paper-cluttered room, took me, as I thought, to the heart of Bohemia, to which I by rights belonged.

Neither of us liked the unfair anti-German talk that was increasing in intensity in England... True, Austen Chamberlain had just returned from a visit to announce that Germany was "one vast arsenal". What of it? Must they not take proper precautions to protect themselves? But weren't the majority of its inhabitants - and Molly travelled widely in Germany and saw them for herself - enjoying life as they hadn't enjoyed it for many years, with good roads to drive on in their cheap and wellmade little cars, a freedom from industrial troubles, a decrease in violence, a return to sanity and security, in fact? They were borne on an upsurge of hope and confidence, freed from the long, lingering misery of defeat, we agreed.

We had to admit that the women's clothes were a trifle behind the times, that people's mobility was strictly controlled, and that freedom as we had been trained to understand it was certainly lacking; but these things were part of the birth pangs, and would improve as the economy became stable, and full stature was regained...

In the meantime, we listened to the tramp of marching soldiers in the streets at intervals, and found their triumphant songs and happy faces immensely heartening. The Germans were realists.

An encounter with the Gestapo, no less, gave me one more proof of the perfidy of the detractors. The two men who called for me were insignificant looking enough. Only Frau B (landlady) flurried manner and anxious eyes as she ushered me into their presence warned me that they were not as they seemed; and the swift turning back of the jacket lapels gave the final theatrical touch. Neither could speak English, nor could their chief, to whose bureau they accompanied me on foot. Whether I got anything across in my execrable German of my admiration for their country, I don't know. At all events, the handsome man with the grey, clipped moustache, appraising me from behind his desk, had soon had enough of me, abruptly shook my hand, and had me taken away, not to an extermination camp, but out into the street and freedom.

Molly Hiscox had invited her (Norah Briscoe) to share her flat at 50 Thornton Road, Streatham, where she had introduced her to her lover, Richard Houston, known as "Jock". Mother immediately fell under his spell. The stooge would heckle, and the dialogue would descend into a shouting match; a crowd would gather, and Jock would have an audience.

Jack told them what he told anyone who would listen: that he, they, and the nation were being kept down by an international conspiracy of Jews. The unemployed were told that the money that should be creating work for them was being hoarded by Jewish financiers, and that their jobs would be stolen from them by "refu-Jews" from the only country that was dealing with the Jewish menace, Hitler's Germany. Those who had fought in the Great War were told that its only beneficiaries were profiteering Jewish businessmen. And everybody was told that the Jews were cooking up another conflict with Germany to serve their own selfish interests. The problem and its solution were summed up in the slogan chanted by Jock and fellow members of Sir Oswald Mosley's Blackshirts as they marched through the East End of London: "The Yids! The Yids! We gotta get rid of the Yids!"

The analysis was crude, hateful and false - but Mother embraced it uncritically. Hitler sold these ideas to a Germany that had been humiliated in the recent war; Jock, and others like him, peddled them to Englishmen robbed of jobs and self-respect in the subsequent peace. But there was another reason for Mother's enthusiasm. Jock saw himself as a leading figure in English fascism. He boasted that when England had a Fascist government, he would be a Gauleiter and his friends would be figures of influence. Mother's admiration for him was genuine, but it was not without self-interest.

If Hitler had won the war, Jock might very well have been given the power he craved, though I wonder how long he would have hung on to it. He was a misfit. His personality wasn't flexible enough to enable him to cooperate with anyone else. He only really got on with two people: Molly, who worshipped him, and Mother, who was then in awe of him. Everybody else he met would sooner or later disagree with something that he said and be dismissed as "stupitt", a word he pronounced often and in the Glaswegian manner.

In the early 193os, Jock had been the blue-eyed boy of Sir Oswald Mosley's British Union of Fascists, drumming up recruits so effectively that he was paid by the party to deliver speeches. In 1936, though, Mosley was attempting to tone down his party's anti-Semitism for tactical reasons, and when it got out that Jock had been fined forty shillings in 1935 for using insulting words and behaviour during one of his soapbox rants, Mosley expelled him from the BUF.

This is to introduce you to a journalist friend and author, Mrs Briscoe... You may find her views proceed further in the direction of totalitarianism than your own, as do my own ideas, as you are well aware.

The Norah Briscoe case is developing. She is now looking for some means of getting the documents through to the Germans.

Lunched with M (Charles Maxwell Knight). They relate to the location of factories, shortage of materials, establishment of submarine bases in Northern Ireland, etc.

Liverpool-born Norah Briscoe dumped her only son in Germany and left him there when war broke out.

Besotted with Nazism, she returned to Britain to spy for the Germans, was caught red-handed by MI5 and narrowly avoided being hanged for treason.

It is more than 60 years since World War II ended, but it continues to throw up extraordinary stories - and few are as astonishing as the mother-and-son tale of Norah and Paul Briscoe, now told in a newly published book by Paul himself.

Paul was Norah's only son, born in 1930 when his mother was a freelance journalist and writer, fiercely ambitious for herself, struggling in a man's world to place articles and short stories in newspapers and magazines.

She saw herself as a cut above the rest, someone destined for great things. Mysteriously, for such an exotic creature, she married a plain man - Robert Briscoe, a civil service clerk who loved his garden, his dogs and his car.

He died of appendicitis after three years of marriage, leaving Norah a widow and more desperate than ever for adventure....

After her husband's death, Norah bumped into a friend on a train who recommended a guest-house in Bavaria for a holiday. Germany was an instant hit: she loved everything about it - the forests and mountains, the pretty towns and, above all, the Fuhrer.

Heel-clicking Nazi Party officials treated the foreign journalist as an honoured guest. She was dined, flattered and seduced, not sexually but politically.

As a middle-class child in Liverpool, she had been pushed to one side when her mother gave birth to triplets and she was sent to live with two elderly aunts. A convent schooling sharpened her sense of rejection. In Hitler's Germany, she found her home.

Her son writes: "Mother had found a flag that offered her the recognition she felt was hers by right and which had been denied her by her family and by society."

Back in England, she took up with the Right, but at its furthest edge - and beyond. She aligned herself politically with the ranting, fanatical 'Jock' Houston, a soapbox orator whose anti-Semitism was too virulent even for Oswald Mosley and his Blackshirts.

Norah descended into a dangerous-underworld of extremists who hated the Jews. Some wore a silver badge in the shape of an eagle killing a snake, with the letters 'PJ' - Perish Judah.

"The fascist cause became an obsession," her son writes. "She talked of little else. The Jews were parasites conspiring to destroy western civilisation and engineering a war that had to be stopped."

While championing the fascist cause in England, Norah was also making regular trips to Germany, drawn to the picturesque town of Miltenberg in the Odenwald forest. With its cobbled streets and ancient, timber-framed buildings, to her it was Aryan heaven....

Most mothers would be frantic if their child was marooned, but Norah was no ordinary mother. "I never feared for his welfare in the enemy's land," she wrote.

And she had work to do. She booed Churchill whenever he appeared on the cinema newsreels and started loud anti-war conversations in pubs. MI5 and Special Branch watched and did nothing.

Norah took a job as a typist in the Ministry of Supply. Vetting should have weeded her out as a security risk, but the bureaucracy failed utterly, and she was promoted to typing up sensitive documents about submarine bases and the shortage of spare parts.

"I get sight of such important official documents," she told her clandestine group of fascist friends. "When I come across a really hot one, I make a carbon copy and keep it."

Molly Hiscox, lover of 'Jock' Houston (who had been interned under emergency wartime regulations), was thrilled. How could they get this stuff to 'the other side'?

One of the group, a man called John, also seemed very interested. He had a friend, Kurtz, he said, but he would probably want original documents rather than just copies. Meetings were arranged at a flat in Swan Court, Chelsea.

Both John and Kurtz were, of course, MI5 agents, and they were setting up the classic sting. Norah and her friend Molly were too silly, unable to grasp the seriousness of what they were doing. The trap was set and they fell into it.
The day of the meeting, a German bomb had just devastated Bank Underground station, killing 56 people.

"Have you seen the crater?" Molly asked Kurtz gleefully, excited to be talking to a 'real' German spy. "Isn't it just marvellous!"

Norah produced a sheaf of papers from her handbag and began to explain their contents. The hidden tape recorder noted every word. She came to a list of power stations, "which gives you an idea of what to get at".

The spy-catchers had all they needed. Two police officers came through the door and Norah and Molly were soon in Holloway jail.

They should have been hanged despite the fact that nothing had been communicated to Germany. Norah had, without doubt, tried to communicate secret military information to the enemy, and that was a capital offence.

Their lawyer saved them. At a closed hearing at the Old Bailey, he argued that they were deluded and deranged rather than treacherous. The judge gave them five years apiece.

Paul Briscoe was born in Streatham, south-west London, on July 12 1930. His mother, born Norah Davies, was a journalist with literary and social ambitions; his father, Reginald Briscoe, was a clerk at the Ministry of Works. Reginald died in 1932, leaving a widow who was bitter that he had not taken out life insurance, and resentful that she was encumbered with a son, for whom she felt no affection. A nanny looked after Paul while his mother attempted to rebuild her career.

When Norah Briscoe took a holiday in Hitler's Germany in 1934, she fell in love with the country and with a German she met there. The following year she began an extended tour of the Reich, taking Paul with her. They spent much of 1935 and 1936 living out of a suitcase.

When his mother returned to England to file copy and solicit more freelance commissions, Paul was left in the care of her fiancé's parents. He moved in with them permanently when he was six, so that he could go to school. The plan was for Norah to join them later, but she and her fiancé drifted apart. Paul, however, remained with his new family, an arrangement that suited all parties.

His mother's visits became less frequent, and when war was declared in 1939 they stopped. Her efforts to get Paul back to England failed. He was stranded in Germany for the duration, and his German family adopted him to spare him internment.

"The war gave me a perfect opportunity to demonstrate my loyalty to the nation and the family that had accepted me," he wrote later. "The most obvious way of helping the war effort was to join the Hitler Youth." Boys had to be at least 10 to enrol in its junior section, the Jungvolk, but Paul was so keen that he was allowed to join two months early, on Hitler's birthday.

When he swore the oath of allegiance to the Führer, he meant it. "I would have carved those words in my heart if they had asked me to," he wrote. In 1944 he joined the Feuerwehr, the auxiliary fire service, and was injured in an air-raid that destroyed his school. The following year he was an eyewitness to the surrender of Miltenberg by its Bürgermeister and the town's occupation by American troops.

In October 1945 a British Army officer appeared at the door of Briscoe's adoptive family and announced that he had half an hour to pack: he was going "home" – to a country whose language he had long forgotten and to a mother he had not heard from for four years. It was an unhappy reunion, followed by a shock. Norah Briscoe explained why she had not kept in touch: she had been in prison. She had been caught trying to pass information to the enemy. If one of the two charges against her had not been dropped, she would have been hanged.

She was, however, unrepentant, and proudly presented her Germanised son to her friends, including the soapbox anti-Semite "Jock" Houston, whose rabidity was so uncontrolled that he had been expelled from the British Union of Fascists. Later, Briscoe wrote that the last time he had heard talk like Jock's he had gone along with it, but hearing it again he could see how, even as a child, he should have recognised it for what it was.

Having repudiated the anti-Semitism with which he had been indoctrinated, Briscoe recounted his participation in Kristallnacht with shame. "What I did was a sin," he wrote, "a small part of one of the greatest sins of all time, which could never have happened without many lesser sins like mine. May God forgive me for it."

Paul Briscoe was a gifted raconteur, and delivered many talks about his experiences to audiences in Britain and Germany. He wrote two autobiographical memoirs, Foster Fatherland (2002) and My Friend the Enemy (2007). In each, he presented a child's-eye view of the hopes, fears and disappointments of an ordinary German family as the war progressed.

He described in detail the increasing privations of everyday life as the Reich began to crumble, including a visit to the dentist in which his tooth was stopped with melted-down coins. He recorded how Nazi propaganda poisoned every aspect of the school curriculum: his maths books taught subtraction by asking how much more profit was made by the Jew who charged more for his goods than the Aryan; his history lessons listed the evils of the British Empire. He was taught to think of the English as his enemy.

After the war Briscoe and his mother found a home and employment in the community of pacifists and misfits established by the literary critic John Middleton Murry at Lodge Farm, Thelnetham, Suffolk. In 1949 he found himself back in Germany on national service, in which he was ordered to dress in civvies and spy on meetings of Nazi sympathisers. After demobilisation he repaired historic buildings for the Ministry of Works.

In 1956 he married Monica Larter, an infant schoolteacher. In 1960 he, too, qualified as a teacher and he went on to teach woodwork and German at schools in Essex and Suffolk.

In 1975 he became joint manager of Monica's family farm at Framlingham, where he played an active part in the community as a church warden, conservationist and supporter of local charities.

He kept in close touch with his German foster family, and was reconciled to his mother, whose extremism faded, and who spent her last 30 years living with Paul, his wife and their children.

Paul Briscoe is survived by his wife, by their son and daughter, and by a daughter by an earlier relationship in Germany.

Adolf Hitler's Early Life (Answer Commentary)

Heinrich Himmler and the SS (Answer Commentary)

Trade Unions in Nazi Germany (Answer Commentary)

Adolf Hitler v John Heartfield (Answer Commentary)

Hitler's Volkswagen (The People's Car) (Answer Commentary)

Women in Nazi Germany (Answer Commentary)

The Assassination of Reinhard Heydrich (Answer Commentary)

The Last Days of Adolf Hitler (Answer Commentary)

(1) Paul Briscoe, My Friend the Enemy: An English Boy in Nazi Germany (2007) page 13

(2) The Daily Mail (21st April, 2007)

(3) Norah Briscoe, Daemons and Magnets (unpublished)

(4) Paul Briscoe, My Friend the Enemy: An English Boy in Nazi Germany (2007) page 19

(5) The Daily Telegraph (20th August, 2010)

(6) The Daily Mail (21st April, 2007)

(7) Norah Briscoe, Daemons and Magnets (unpublished)

(8) Paul Briscoe, My Friend the Enemy: An English Boy in Nazi Germany (2007) page 28

(9) Lord Rothermere, The Daily Mail (22nd January 1934)

(10) Paul Briscoe, My Friend the Enemy: An English Boy in Nazi Germany (2007) page 28

(11) The Daily Telegraph (20th August, 2010)

(12) Norah Briscoe, Daemons and Magnets (unpublished)

(13) The Daily Mail (21st April, 2007)

(14) Paul Briscoe, My Friend the Enemy: An English Boy in Nazi Germany (2007) page 44

(15) Paul Briscoe, My Friend the Enemy: An English Boy in Nazi Germany (2007) pages 63-65

(16) The Daily Mail (21st April, 2007)

(17) Paul Briscoe, My Friend the Enemy: An English Boy in Nazi Germany (2007) page 70

(18) Dr Leigh Vaughan-Henry, letter to Emil Van Loo (6th June, 1939)

(19) Paul Briscoe, My Friend the Enemy: An English Boy in Nazi Germany (2007) page 71

(20) Archibald Ramsay, The Nameless War (1955) page 105

(21) The Daily Mail (21st April, 2007)

(22) Archibald Ramsay, House of Commons (22nd September, 1939)

(23) Richard Griffiths, Fellow Travellers of the Right (1983) page 370

(24) New York Times, (25th July, 1941)

(25) Anonymous letter sent to Scotland Yard (May, 1940)

(26) Paul Briscoe, My Friend the Enemy: An English Boy in Nazi Germany (2007) page 118

(27) The Daily Mail (21st April, 2007)

(28) Paul Briscoe, My Friend the Enemy: An English Boy in Nazi Germany (2007) page 119

(29) Guy Liddell, diary entry (13th March, 1941)

(30) Paul Briscoe, My Friend the Enemy: An English Boy in Nazi Germany (2007) pages 128-129

(31) Julie V. Gottlieb, Femine Fascism: Women in Britain's Fascist Movement (2003) page 287

(32) Guy Liddell, diary entry (17th June, 1941)

(33) The Daily Telegraph (20th August, 2010)

(34) Paul Briscoe, My Friend the Enemy: An English Boy in Nazi Germany (2007) page 169

(35) Paul Briscoe, My Friend the Enemy: An English Boy in Nazi Germany (2007) page 184

(36) The Daily Telegraph (20th August, 2010)

(37) Norah Briscoe, Daemons and Magnets (unpublished)

(38) Paul Briscoe, My Friend the Enemy: An English Boy in Nazi Germany (2007) page 199

(39) The Daily Telegraph (20th August, 2010)

(40) Paul Briscoe, My Friend the Enemy: An English Boy in Nazi Germany (2007) page 204

(41) The Daily Telegraph (20th August, 2010)

(42) Paul Briscoe, My Friend the Enemy: An English Boy in Nazi Germany (2007) page 209


The Descendants of William Greenberry Dossey and Thomas K Dossey of South Carolina 1787 2015 Online PDF eBook

DOWNLOAD The Descendants of William Greenberry Dossey and Thomas K Dossey of South Carolina 1787 2015 PDF Online. Record of the descendants of William Sumner, of Dorchester . Record of the descendants of William Sumner, of Dorchester, Mass., 1636 by Appleton, William S. (William Sumner), 1840 1903. cn at OnRead.com the best online ebook storage. Download and read online for free Record of the descendants of William Sumner, of Dorchester, Mass., 1636 by Appleton, William S. (William Sumner), 1840 1903. cn The Descendants of William Henry Lee Free Databases Family of John Lee in Homer, Illinois The Descendants of William Henry Lee as compiled by Dennis Kowallek 293 Cochran Rd. Hamilton, OH 45013 Read online "The Genealogical Registry of the Butters . Read The Genealogical Registry of the Butters Family. Including the Descendants of William Butter, of Woburn, Mass., 1665, And the Families of New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Ohio, Iowa And Others Bearing the Name, Who Settled in America absolutely for free at Read Any Book.com a history and genealogy of the descendants of william . a history and genealogy of the descendants of william hammond of london england by roland hammond at OnRead.com the best online ebook storage. Download and read online for free a history and genealogy of the descendants of william hammond of london england by roland hammond DESCENDANTS OF POCAHONTAS TheAllenders.com DESCENDANTS OF POCAHONTAS Page 1 of 7 Printed 10 08 07 Pocahontas (17 Sep 1595 1617) (m 05 Apr 1614, Jamestown Va) John Rolfe (06 May 1585 Mar 1622) The Chandler family. The descendants of William and Annis . The Chandler family. The descendants of William and Annis Chandler who settled in Roxbury, Mass., 1637 by Chandler, George, 1806 1893. Publication date 1883 Topics . SINGLE PAGE PROCESSED JP2 ZIP download. download 1 file . TORRENT download. download 18 Files download 10 Original. SHOW ALL. IN COLLECTIONS. Boston Public Library. American . Famous Descendants of William the Conqueror of England . The list below shows descent from William the Conqueror (see Descendants of William I of England for another list). Many of the people have more than one path to William, but this is mostly just showing one (ideally the shortest path). As William is an 11th generation descendant of Charlemagne (747 814), the people below also descend from . Related search for James William Montgomery [PDF] eBooks . ProtectOurCoastLine Your Search Result For James William Montgomery History of the Descendants and Connections of William Montgomery and James Somerville, Who Emigrated to America from Ireland, in the Opening Years of(9781314904260), The Law of Theatres and Music Halls(9781360662022), The Law of Theatres and Music Halls(9781360951331), The Montgomery Manuscripts(9781342050946), Poems By .

The Hoadley genealogy a history of the descendants of . The Hoadley genealogy a history of the descendants of William Hoadley of Branford, Connecticut together with some account of other families of the name Item Preview remove circle Download Free.

The Descendants of William Greenberry Dossey and Thomas K Dossey of South Carolina 1787 2015 eBook

The Descendants of William Greenberry Dossey and Thomas K Dossey of South Carolina 1787 2015 eBook Reader PDF

The Descendants of William Greenberry Dossey and Thomas K Dossey of South Carolina 1787 2015 ePub

The Descendants of William Greenberry Dossey and Thomas K Dossey of South Carolina 1787 2015 PDF

eBook Download The Descendants of William Greenberry Dossey and Thomas K Dossey of South Carolina 1787 2015 Online


Timeline of 100 years of Catholic Deaf Community NSW

1914 Catholic Deaf Association was formed in Sydney by Arthur Power (Deaf) with the support of Sister Mary Gabriel Hogan (Deaf) and Sister Mary Columba Dwyer of Rosary Convent Deaf School, Waratah (Newcastle NSW). The first deaf committee were Arthur Power (President), Marianne Hanney, Maggie Duffy, Michael and Mary Carmody, all ex-pupils of Rosary Convent. Sister Mary Gabriel Hogan came from Ireland to Australia in 1875 to open the Deaf School in Newcastle – the first Catholic Deaf School in Australia (School moved to Rosary Convent, Waratah in 1888).

1914 + During the early days of the Association, social gatherings were held in the home of Michael and Mary Carmody at Abbotsford, Sydney. Also, its members returned to the Rosary Convent for annual weekend retreats where the Dominican Sisters interpreted the priest’s talks.

1916 Annual Retreat at Waratah.

1921 Annual reunion at ‘Santa Sabina’ Dominican Convent in Strathfield in January.

1922 St Gabriel’s Deaf School for Boys was opened at Castle Hill, Sydney by the Christian Brothers from Ireland. Like Waratah, the method of instruction at St Gabriel’s was by the ‘Manual System’ (Irish one hand finger spelling and signs). The Catholic Deaf Association became a formal organisation with Brother Damian Allen as President and Arthur Power as Secretary.

1922 + Monthly meetings for spiritual instructions were held at St Mary’s Cathedral Chapter Hall, Sydney.

1924 10 th Anniversary. Social gatherings were continued at the Carmody home in Abbotsford. The three days retreat was held at St Mary’s Cathedral in November and the Christian Brothers interpreted Fr Hogan’s talks there.

1928 Annual Reunion at Santa Sabina, Strathfield in January.

1929 Annual Adult Catholic Deaf Picnic day was held at St Gabriel’s, Castle Hill in November.

1930 Annual Reunion at Santa Sabina, Strathfield where Father Dominic Phillips (having Deaf sister) gave spiritual instruction in January. For the first time in the history of Australian Catholic Deaf they were addressed by a priest in their own sign language and no interpreter was required.

1931 Annual Reunion at Santa Sabina, Strathfield with Father Phillips’ mission.

1932 Annual Reunion at Santa Sabina, Strathfield with Father Phillips’ mission. Monthly meetings continued at St Mary’s Cathedral school-rooms.

1933 Annual Reunion at Santa Sabina, Strathfield with Father Phillips’ mission.

1934 Annual Reunion at Santa Sabina, Strathfield with Father Phillips’ mission.

1935 Annual Reunion at Santa Sabina, Strathfield with Father Phillips in January. Father Phillips was appointed the first Chaplain to the Adult Catholic Deaf in Sydney (and in Australia). December saw the annual retreat at St Gabriel’s and picnic outing to Avalon Beach.

1936 Picnic outing to Royal National Park in January. Under Father Phillips the Catholic Women’s Association formed a sub-committee to focus on helping the Adult Catholic Deaf Community with Mary ‘Belle’ Thornton as the convenor (‘Ladies Auxiliary’). Social gatherings were then held regularly in the Catholic Women’s Association rooms in King Street, Sydney.

1937 Annual Reunion at Santa Sabina, Strathfield with Father Phillips in February. Sad news came when Father Phillips moved to his new job in New Zealand and Father Greville Templeton (partially Deaf) replaced him as the new Chaplain. Monthly instruction for Adult Catholic Deaf was held at the room of the Catholic Women’s Association room after many years in St Mary’s Cathedral Chapter Hall.

1939 25 th Anniversary was celebrated with a Silver Jubilee dinner in St Mary’s Cathedral Chapter Hall in November.

1940 Catholic Deaf Association moved into their first Club rooms at Lisgar House, 20 Carrington Street, Sydney where activities flourished. Cardinal Gilroy blessed this new meeting place of the Catholic Deaf in April.

1941 Annual Reunion at Santa Sabina, Strathfield with Father Herbert Myers, Military Chaplain (who can converse by finger spelling and signs) in January. The Ephpheta Feast Day was celebrated by Sydney Catholic Deaf for the first time with a picnic at ‘Loyola Grail’ headquarters, Greenwich in August.

1942 Cardinal Gilroy appointed Father William Malone as a new part-time Chaplain for the Deaf in April. He continued as a tireless and beloved Chaplain and advocate for the Catholic Deaf Community he served for over 36 years until 1979. The Annual Christmas Party was held in Lisgar House in December with Father Malone.

1943 The Ephpheta Feast Day was celebrated at the home of Our Lady’s Nurses at Coogee.

1946 Annual Reunion at Santa Sabina, Strathfield in January.

1947 Annual Reunion at Santa Sabina, Strathfield in January and at St Gabriel’s in October.

1948 Annual Communion at St Mary’s Cathedral following by Breakfast in Cusa House, 175 Elizabeth Street, Sydney in August

1949 Weekly Club Friday night was transferred to Legion House, 161 Castlereagh Street, Sydney in July. Regular social nights were changed to the 2nd Friday of each month in September. Annual Communion at St Mary’s Cathedral following by Breakfast in Legion House in August.

1950 Annual Communion at St Mary’s Cathedral following by Breakfast in Cusa House in August.

1951 Annual Communion at St Mary’s Cathedral following by Breakfast in Cusa House in August.

1952 Ferrini House, Croydon was changed into a hostel for Catholic Deaf working lads in July under the work of Allan Prescott, the only Catholic layman in Sydney who was proficient in sign language. Annual Communion at St Mary’s Cathedral following by Breakfast in Cusa House in August.

1954 Annual Communion at St Mary’s Cathedral following by Breakfast in Cusa House in August. Annual Reunion and Fete Day at St Gabriel’s in September.

1956 The beautiful Catholic Deaf Association banner painted by Ron Wild was blessed by Cardinal Gilroy who always showed great interest in its members and welfare.

1957 Catholic Deaf Debuntes Ball held in Legion House.

1959 Catholic Deaf Debuntes Ball held in Legion House.

1961 Catholic Deaf Debuntes Ball held in Legion House with Cardinal Gilroy in April.

1964 50 th Anniversary. Father Anthony Ryan was appointed Assistant Chaplain to the Catholic Deaf.

1965 A new branch of Catholic Deaf Association was formed – Catholic Deaf Oral Club with Fr Ryan.

1966 Catholic Deaf social gatherings were moved to Marion House in Castlereagh Street. The exciting news came when the Pope allowed Fr Malone to use the sign language in the Mass in a unique ceremony in the crypt of St Mary’s Cathedral which was televised for national viewing – the world first occurrence – on Ephpheta Feast Day in August.

1971 Father John McKinnon was appointed as Assistant Chaplain for the Catholic Deaf.

1972 Annual Ephpheta Day Mass celebrated by Fr Malone in the crypt of St Mary’s Cathedral following by Breakfast in Cusa House.

1975 Annual Ephpheta Day Mass and luncheon held at Santa Sabina, Strathfield in August. There was a big celebration of the Centenary of Catholic Deaf Education in Australia (1875-1975) in Newcastle in August.

1976 Last Catholic Deaf gathering at Marion House, Sydney in March before moving to the new Adult Deaf Centre (Deaf Society of NSW premises) in Cambridge Street, Stanmore. Deaf Mass was held on 2 nd Sunday afternoon of each month there. Catholic Deaf Friendship Club (formerly Catholic Oral Deaf Club) joined up with the Catholic Deaf Association.

1977 Annual Ephpheta Day Mass held in the crypt of St Mary’s Cathedral following by luncheon at Sydney Catholic Club.

1978 Annual Ephpheta Day Mass held in the crypt of St Mary’s Cathedral following by luncheon at Sydney Catholic Club. Father John Anderson was appointed as Assistant Chaplain for the Catholic Deaf.

1978 Jeanne Crowe retired as Secretary of Ladies Auxiliary (Hearing) of Catholic Deaf Association in October after 26 years. The important National Catholic Deaf Conference was held in Canberra in November and their theme was ‘Deaf People in the Church’. A national body called the ‘Catholic Association of Deaf and Hearing Impaired People of Australia Inc’ (CADHIPA) was then formed.

1979 The Ephpheta Centre was opened in Paddington to provide services to the Catholic Deaf Community in Sydney. Sister Helen Gaffey was the first Director of the Ephpheta Centre. Annual Ephpheta Day Mass and luncheon held at Stanmore Deaf Centre in August. Father Malone said his last Deaf Mass at Stanmore in December. The State body ‘CADHIPA (NSW) was formed in Sydney and the Catholic Deaf Association was one of their several representatives.

1980 Monthly Deaf Mass continued at Stanmore every 2 nd Sunday morning of each month including Ephpheta Day Mass in August.

1982 Catholic Women’s League (Ladies Auxiliary) helpers including Jeanne Crowe ceased catering services to Catholic Deaf Association after 46 years.

1984 Annual Ephpheta Day Mass held at St Francis Church, Paddington in August.

1989 The Ephpheta Centre moved from Paddington to Lewisham. Regular Deaf Mass commenced at Lewisham. The Catholic Deaf in the Parramatta Diocese formed their own organisation, ‘CADHIPA – Parramatta Diocese’. Father Peter Fitzgerald became the Chaplain. Catholic Deaf Association celebrates 75 years!

1991 CADHIPA (NSW) joined up with the Catholic Deaf Association under the new name ‘CADHIPA – Sydney/Broken Bay in October.

1996 The Ephpheta Centre moved from Lewisham to Flemington.

1998 National CADHIPA closed.

1999 CADHIPA – Sydney/Broken Bay was renamed as Catholic Deaf Association – Sydney/Broken Bay while CADHIPA – Parramatta Diocese was renamed as Catholic Deaf Association – Parramatta Diocese.

2001 Father Peter Woodward replaced Fr Peter Fitzgerald as Chaplain to the Catholic Deaf.

2005 Cardinal George Pell decided it was time for a Deaf layperson to become director of the Ephpheta Centre and Stephen Lawlor was appointed.

2009 The Ephpheta Centre was again on the move, this time to Punchbowl.

2010 Catholic Deaf Community – Parramatta Diocese joined with the Catholic Deaf Association – Sydney/Broken Bay Dioceses under the new name ‘Catholic Deaf Community NSW’.

2012 Stephen Lawlor was awarded the honour of a Papal award, receiving the honour of Knight of St Sylvester in recognition of his work in the Church and to the Catholic Deaf community.

2013 Father Peter Woodward retired as Chaplain to the Catholic Deaf after 12 years.

2014 Catholic Deaf Community NSW celebrates their 100 th Anniversary with Mass at St Mary’s Cathedral and luncheon in Castlereagh Club (Catholic Club). Three part-time Chaplains are appointed: Fr John Paul Escarlan, Fr Michael Lanzon and Fr Kim Ha.


Echoes of The Rising: Robert Briscoe Becomes a Courier

W ith the approach of the 1916 Irish Easter Rising Centennial, there’s been renewed interest in "Shalom Ireland," a documentary film I made about Ireland’s remarkable, yet little known, Jewish community (www.ShalomIreland.com). So I picked up my copy of "For the Life of Me," the autobiography of Robert Briscoe and re-read the chapters about the Rising and the War of Independence.

Robert Briscoe, was a young Irish Jew, working as an apprentice at a German export company, when war broke out in 1914. So he set sail for America to seek his fortune.

According to Briscoe’s autobiography, the journey was made rather enjoyable by the company of Norah Connolly, daughter of eventual Easter Rising leader and labor activist James Connolly. She fell in love with Briscoe for the voyage.

Norah Connolly, who had become fond of Briscoe, gave him a sealed envelope

One night, Norah gave Robert a sealed envelope and asked him to take care of it. Flattered by the confidence she had placed in him, Robert put it in his breast pocket and thought nothing more of it. When they reached New York, Norah was met by James Larkin, the great leader of the Irish workers. Norah asked Robert for the envelope and handed it to Larkin. At that point, he realized that he had been a courier.

Much later, Briscoe learned that the papers were dispatches from James Connolly to German Ambassador Count von Bernstorff. These were the beginning of what was known as the “German Plot,” the attempt of Irish patriots to enlist German aid and arms in Ireland’s fight for independence.

The German arms never arrived. Robert remained in New York during the Rising and attended meetings of Clan na Gael, the organization of Irish-Americans who were working for Irish freedom. Although his business was prospering, Briscoe returned to Ireland in 1917 to join the cause for Irish freedom running guns and ammunition from Germany for the Irish Republican Army. He was later elected to the Dáil and was the first Jewish Lord Mayor of Dublin. Briscoe is profiled in Shalom Ireland (www.ShalomIreland.com).

In my book That's Just How it Was I have written about how good the Jewish Community were to the Irish people during the Famine and beyond.

The Jewish Community also suffered terrible discrimination in Ireland .

Temple Bar in Dublin owes it name to the fact that the first Temple in Ireland built near Trinity College in the vicinity of Temple Bar and its surrounding business. In their wisdom the Irish people put a bar on the Jewish Community on to encroach on their territory hence the name Temple Bar.talk about 'biting the hand that feeds you'

It is now a thriving area with all sort of cultures arriving from every corner of the globe to be entertained hold stag + Hen Parties etc . etc.

In Helena Malony's [read my blogs on the 1916 Leaders of the 1916 Easter Rising] case it was a British Soldier who was the unwitting accomplice who carried her gun laden case to the Boat train for Ireland from London .. Women and their wiles !


She's typecast a couple of ways over

Apart from a slew of recurring roles, TV parts, and big-time movie gigs, Dennings has had two distinct and dominant career eras. First, she had her "queen of cool indie movies" phase, and then she had her 2 Broke Girls era. In the former, she starred in films such as Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist, a late 2000s zeitgeist-capturing film in which she and fellow millennial icon Michael Cera play a couple of indie rock-loving teens who come to love each other as well. In the latter phase, she plays Max — the same character week in and week out for six seasons.

A successful acting career can be both a blessing and a curse: Dennings is so closely associated with cool, hip girls and sarcastic Broke girls, respectively, that she could find herself typecast a couple of ways over. Agents and directors might not be able to envision her in other roles.


Norah Briscoe - History

This site uses terms that appear in historical records. No offence is intended.

An illegitimate birth is not necessarily a 'dead end' in genealogy. Family historians can sometimes identify the child's biological father by using various documents in record offices and libraries.

Names of mothers and children listed below came from many different series of records, some more informative than others. The original document gives the putative father's name and often other details, which may include his place of residence, occupation, age, nationality or place of origin, a detailed physical description or a photograph, or clues that will lead to Court or prison records. The mother's address, occupation and other details are sometimes shown.

In most cases the document that I've indexed names the child's mother. It is less common for the child's name to be mentioned. Read the explanation VERY carefully before you check the list of names.

  • Most names are MOTHERS of illegitimate children. Most lived in Australia (there are names from all Australian States) but some were overseas.
  • CHILDREN whose father is named have [child] after their name.
  • A few of the children were stillborn, and the birth/death may not have been registered.
  • For each person listed below, a document names the alleged FATHER of the child.
  • Names are from eighteen (18) different record series. Their content varies, but always includes the name of the child's father.
  • Names are from various dates between 1858 and 1964.
  • This is an ongoing project. When more names are added, I'll announce it in my email newsletter and on What's New.
  • Names without a surname, eg 'Nina (Aboriginal)', are listed under the first letter of the name.
  • Scroll through the list. Many names were spelled incorrectly in the records.
  • Names beginning with 'Mc' precede other 'M' surnames.
  • Apostrophes have been removed from names such as O'DONNELL.
  • In an entry such as 'SIMPSON .. (daughter of Mary SIMPSON)', the illegitimate child's mother is a daughter of Mary SIMPSON.
  • If there are several entries for a name, investigate them all. There are often several records with different information about the same person.
  • For names below, if you need more information or copies of original records , see 'Research/Copying Service' for instructions.
  1. Watch for more names to be added *here* as indexing progresses.
  2. See 'Other suggestions'.
  3. See my mini-guide 'Researching Illegitimate Children' for advice on research strategies, and a long list of sources that may name the child's father.

ABBLEY Ivey
ABDULLAH Nita
ABRAMS Florrie
ABSOLON Ruby Gertrude
ACRES Beatrice
ACTION Ethel Violet
ADAM Annie Elizabeth (see ADAMS)
ADAM Arthur [child]
ADAM Arthur [child]
ADAMS Annie Elizabeth
ADAMS Arthur [child]
ADAMS Lily Florence
ADAMS Mary Agnes
ADAMS Priscilla
ADDICOTT Jessie May
AFFLECK Jane
AFFLECK Mary
AFFOO Elizabeth
AGNEW May
AH LUM Rosina
AH TOW Kate
AHERN Charlotte
AHERN Honora
AHERN Margaret Catherine
AHLES Yvonne
AHLES Yvonne
AIKEN Bertha M
AIREY Agnes
AIREY Sarah
AIRY Sarah (see AIREY)
AITKEN Janet
AITKEN Jessie
AKERS Mary Ann
ALBRESS Cecilia
ALEXANDER Agnes
ALEXANDER Annie
ALFORD Elizabeth
ALLAN .. (Mrs)
ALLAN Ethel May
ALLEN Barbara Ann
ALLEN Elizabeth
ALLEN Emily
ALLEN Johanna
ALLEN Maud May
ALLENDER Isabella
ALLEY Maria
ALLTHORPE Ellen
AMBERY Eileen Elizabeth Jane
ANDERIEN Matilda
ANDERSEN Charlotte
ANDERSON Alice Maud
ANDERSON Amelia [child]
ANDERSON Ann
ANDERSON Annie (of Roma)
ANDERSON Arthur Wallace [child]
ANDERSON Cecilia Martha
ANDERSON Eliza [child]
ANDERSON Florence
ANDERSON Florence M
ANDERSON Frederick Allen [child]
ANDERSON Grace
ANDERSON Lizzie
ANDERSON Lizzie
ANDERSON Mary Ann
ANDERSON Nellie
ANDERSON Nellie
ANDERSON Rose Frances (widow)
ANDERSON Rose Francis (widow)
ANDREW Esther
ANDREWS Allan Francis [child]
ANDREWS Emma
ANDREWS Eva
ANDREWS Louisa
ANDREWS Mary Ann
ANGELO Mary
ANGOOD Ethel Harriet
ANSTOLZ Katie ?
ANTHONY Mary
ANTON Phyllis Ailsa ?
APPLEBY Eunice [child]
APPOO Beatrice May
ARCHER Lydia
ARCHER Maria
ARCHIBALD Isabella
ARGENT Clara Mavis
ARMSTRONG Fanny
ARMSTRONG Florence Ethel
ARMSTRONG Mary E
ARNOLD Ada
ARNOLD Alice Hannah
ARNOLD Matilda A A
ARNOLD William Robert [child]
ARNOTT Adelaide
ARTHUR Alice
ARTHUR Alice
ARTHURS Katie
ASHBY Eliza Jane (see GOLDBOLD)
ASHMAN Ellen
ASHTON Lydia
ASHTON Martha
ASHURST Eliza
ASKEW Vincent [child]
ASKEW Winifred [child]
ASKEW Winifred Maud
ASKEW Winifred Maud
ASPINALL Annie
ASQUITH Elizabeth
ATKINS Louisa
ATKINS Mary
ATKINSON Amy
ATKINSON Charles Harry [child]
ATKINSON Elizabeth Nuttall
AUMANN Gerty
AVERY Catherine Ada
AYERS Isabel
AYRE Emily
AYRES Elizabeth Isabella
How to get copies

BABBE Gertrude Margaret
BACHMANN Jessie
BACKMAN Constance
BADROCK Margaret
BAILEY Ada
BAILEY Ada
BAILEY Bessie
BAILEY Catherine
BAIRD Lila Catherine
BAKER Alice Margaret
BAKER Annie
BAKER Cohn [child]
BAKER Edith Priscilla
BAKER Elizabeth Rebecca
BAKER Julia
BAKER Mary
BAKER Mary
BALDERSON Elizabeth Ann
BALKE Jean Robina
BALL Isabella
BALLIS Lillian Elizabeth
BALMER Violet
BALTZER Betty [child]
BALTZER Martha
BAMFORD Mary
BANCHER Emma
BARBER Florence Annie
BARBEY Catherine
BARCLAY Elizabeth
BARCLAY Isabella
BARDEN Mary
BARKER Amy
BARKER Ethel
BARKER Sarah Ellen
BARLOW Muriel
BARNES Emma Maud
BARNES Isabel Sarah
BARNES Isabel Sarah
BARNETT Kenneth Clyde [child]
BARNETT Ruby
BARR Alice
BARRETT Catherine
BARRETT Mary
BARRETT Maud Clara
BARROSS Alice Edith
BARRY Agnes
BARRY Cyril [child]
BARRY Emily
BARRY Maggie
BARRY Margaret Mary
BARRY Sarah
BARRY Vincent Edward [child]
BARTER Rose
BARTER Vida Rose
BARTLETT Blanche Amy
BARTLETT Emily Beatrice
BARTLETT Margaret
BARTLEY Kate
BARTON Dorothy Elizabeth ?
BARTON Frances
BARTON Harold George [child]
BASSETT Ada
BASTIN Alma
BATTERSHELL Emily Elizabeth
BATTERSHILL Violet
BATTY Frances Maud
BAXTER Kate
BAYLIS Rose
BEAN Edith
BEARD Cynthia
BEASLEY Joyce
BEASLEY Margaret
BEATON Isabella
BEAUCHAMP Louisa Rose
BEAUMONT Jane
BEAZLEY Helena B
BECKER Vera Katherine Elizabeth
BEEARS Florella
BEESLEY Henrietta Matilda
BEIKOFF Lena
BEIN Edith
BELCHER Frances
BELL Elizabeth
BELL Jean [child]
BELL Olga Margaret
BENDALL Violet May
BENN Bernice
BENNETT Ada Amelia
BENNETT Jane
BENNETT Lilly
BENNETT Margaret Jane
BENNETT Mary Elizabeth Jane
BENNETT Rose
BENNETT Rosie
BENNETT Selina Isabella
BENNETTS Iris
BENTLEY Mary
BERESFORD Jeanette [child]
BERESFORD Molly
BERESFORD Molly
BERGAN Grace
BERGHOFFER Ellen Eleanor
BERGIN Bridget
BERNDT Auguste Maria
BERRIE Bessie (see BERRIE Jessie)
BERRIE Jessie
BERRIGAN Bridget
BERRY Mary Ann
BERRY Rachel
BERRYMAN Emma
BERRYMAN Emma
BESSENGER Florence Mary
BEST .. (Mrs R)
BEST Amy
BEST Elizabeth
BEST Mary
BESTON Elizabeth
BETTS Alfred John [child]
BETTS Mary
BEUSCHEL Mary
BEUTEL Linda Evelyn Grace
BEVAN Myrtle
BEVERIDGE Florence Mary
BHUGWANA Marjorie Jessie
BICKERS Harriet
BICKERTON Agnes
BICKOFF Edith M
BIGGS Bessie
BIGGS Dorcas
BILLMAN Sarah Ann
BINNEY Matilda
BIRD Johanna
BIRD Patricia June [child]
BIRKENHEAD Dolly Emma
BIRT Selina
BIRTLES Alice Florence
BISHOP Margaret
BISS Violet Evelyn
BISS Violet Evelyn
BISS Walter Fred [child]
BJURSTROM Olga Sophia
BLACK Catherine
BLACK Ida
BLACK Maggie
BLACK Meryl [child]
BLACKBURN Ivey
BLACKER Florence Georgina
BLACKMORE Charlotte
BLAND Eveline Ruby
BLANK Ida
BLINCO Evelyn May
BLOCKSIDGE Violet Doris May
BLOOMFIELD Jane
BLUCHER Martha
BLUETT Martha
BLUNDELL Emily Amelia
BLUNDELL Louisa
BLYTH Margaret
BOCK Anne
BODDY Rae Elwyn
BODELL Sarah
BODY Elizabeth
BODY Mary Ann
BOGHAN Elizabeth
BOGUE Charlotte
BOHAN Alma Mary
BOHAN Mescah Isabel [child]
BOHAN Mescal Isabel [child] (see BOHAN Mescah Isabel)
BOHEN Alma Mary
BOHLING Miriam
BOLAND Eda Muriel
BOLDERSON Elizabeth Ann
BOLGER Charlotte
BOLLOWAY Alice
BOMBARDIER Sarah Frances
BONAR Agnes
BONDESSON Ellen
BONDS Margaret
BONE Amy
BONE Hannah
BONSER Ada
BOOTER Sarah Elizabeth
BORELL Martha Anna
BORELLA Kathleen
BORLACE Emily (see BORLASE)
BORLASE Emily
BORTHWICK Jessie
BOSEL Kathleen
BOSLEY Bethel (Mrs)
BOTELL Ethel Gladys
BOUCHER Allan John [child]
BOUCHER Emma
BOURKE Alice
BOURKE Bridget
BOURKE Catherine
BOURKE Catherine
BOURKE Irene
BOURKE Nora
BOURKE Rose
BOURNE Ethel May
BOW Doreen
BOWALER Ellen ?
BOWDLER Ellen ?
BOWERMAN Emily
BOWLEN Johannah
BOWLER Martha
BOYCE Eva Isabel
BOYCE Jane
BOYD Annie
BOYD Louisa
BOYD Lucy Susan
BOYD Mabel Jane
BOYD May
BOYLE Mary Ellen
BRABHAM Agnes Charlotte
BRACE Phyllis Maud
BRADLEY Eliza Marie
BRADLEY Julia
BRADSHAW Eliza Jane
BRADSHAW Elizabeth
BRADY Alice
BRADY Ann
BRADY Frances E [child]
BRADY Francis [child of Ann(e) - see Frances E BRADY]
BRAIN Annie
BRAIN Victoria
BRAND Margaret Ellen
BRANDER Elizabeth
BRASSIE Amelia
BRATHWAITE Elsie May
BRAUN Henrietta
BRAYE Elsie
BRAYLEY Ena Ella
BREDESON Mary Elizabeth
BREHANT Amelia
BRENDEL Irene Ida
BRENNAN Elizabeth
BRENNAN Mary
BRENNAN Mary J
BRENNAND Martha
BRENNEN Florence Margaret
BRENNEN Jean Margaret [child]
BRETHERTON Elizabeth Ellen
BRIDGE Winifred Ann
BRIDGES Edith May
BRITTELL Edith
BRITTEN Ada
BRODERICK Georgina
BRODIE Jane
BROGAN Catherine
BROLAN Mary
BROMLEY Mary Ellen
BROOK Bessie
BROOK Viola Berrie (see Viola Bessie BROOK)
BROOK Viola Bessie
BROOKS Allan John [child]
BROOKS Blanch
BROOKS Edith
BROOKS Herbert Edward [child]
BROSNAHAN Dora
BROWN Agnes [child]
BROWN Alice
BROWN Alice
BROWN Alice
BROWN Annie
BROWN Arthur James [child]
BROWN Bridget
BROWN Bridget
BROWN Daisy
BROWN Edith
BROWN Eliza Jane
BROWN Ellen
BROWN Ellen Victoria
BROWN Islett May
BROWN Jane
BROWN Jane
BROWN Janet
BROWN Kate
BROWN M E
BROWN Marion
BROWN Mary
BROWN Mary
BROWN Rose
BROWN Ruby Maud
BROWN Sadie
BROWN Sarah Ann
BROWNE Mary
BROWNE Violet
BROWNE Violet [child]
BROWNING Amelia
BRUCE Delia
BRUCE Elizabeth
BRUCE Elizabeth
BRUMBY Pearl
BRYAN Phyllis
BRYAN Ronald Neal [child]
BRYANT Daisy
BRYANT Phoebe
BRYAR Florence Annie
BRYCE Catherine
BRYCE Isabella
BRYENTON Louiza
BUCHANAN Ada
BUCHANAN James [child]
BUCHANAN Margaret
BUCK Mary Ann
BUCKLAND Mary
BUCKLEY Gladys Evelyn
BUCKLEY Lucy
BUCKLEY Maud Mary
BUDGE Grace Eileen
BUDGE Ralph Allan [child]
BULFIN Bridget
BULL Ada
BULL May Florence
BULLOCK Elizabeth
BULLOCK Erick John [child]
BULLOCK May
BUNTON Anne
BURCHILL Laura Elsie
BURGESS Rose
BURGESS Rose
BURKE Elizabeth
BURKE Ellen
BURMEISTER Annie
BURNS Agnes
BURNS Florence
BURTON Margaret
BUSH Emily
BUTCHER Emily
BUTCHER Myrtle
BUTLER Agnes Ellen
BUTLER Alice
BUTLER Catherine
BUTTER Florence Evelyn (see JERVIS-BUTTER)
BUTTERWORTH Annie
BUTTERWORTH Clara Amelia
BUTTERWORTH Ellen
BUTTERWORTH Mary Ann
BUTTERWORTH Sarah Alice
BYE Mabel
BYE Mabel
BYRNE Kevin [child]
BYRNE Marie
BYRON Catherine
BYRON Euphemia
BYTHEWAY Daisy Bird [child]
BYTHEWAY Sarah Gertrude
BYWATERS Edith Mary
How to get copies

CADMAN Gertrude
CAESAR Clara Blanche
CAESAR Clara Blanche
CAGNEY Mary Ellen
CAHILL Alma
CAHILL Catherine
CAHILL Emmy
CAIRNS Lottie
CAIRNS Theresa
CALLAGHAN Helen
CALLAGHAN Margaret
CALLAGHAN Myrtle
CALLAN Kate
CALLIGAN Annie
CALLINAN Kitty (Miss)
CALMAN Alice
CAMERON A M (of Mackay)
CAMERON Annie
CAMERON Annie
CAMERON Christina
CAMERON Eliza
CAMERON Ellen (in NZ)
CAMERON Flora
CAMERON Jane Frances
CAMERON Mary
CAMP Lila Evelyn Grace
CAMPBELL Ann Jane
CAMPBELL Annie
CAMPBELL Catherine
CAMPBELL Christina
CAMPBELL Elizabeth
CAMPBELL Jane
CAMPBELL Jane
CAMPBELL Mary
CAMPBELL Mary
CAMPBELL Mary Jane
CAMPBELL Maud
CAMPTON Violet Ruby
CANARAN Bessie
CANN Maud
CANNA Elizabeth
CANNALL Maud
CANNAN Gertrude
CANNING Margaret Mary
CANNING Mary Emma
CANNON Kathleen
CANTLE Edith
CANTLE Edith
CANTWELL Elizabeth
CANTWELL Fanny
CAPELL Francisca
CARBURRY Margaret Jane
CARBURY Annie
CARBURY Maria
CAREN Margaret
CAREY Mary
CAREY Matilda (Mrs)
CARL Amelia
CARLOW Annie
CARMODY Ida Ellen
CARMODY Iris Jean
CARNAGHAN Annie May
CARR Mary
CARROLL Catherine A
CARROLL Ellen
CARROLL Laura
CARROLL Margaret
CARSWELL Kathleen Elizabeth
CARTER Annie
CARTER Charlotte Jane
CARTER Ellen
CARTER Hannah
CARTER Isabella Janet
CARTON Margaret Ann
CARTWRIGHT Alice
CARTWRIGHT Kathleen Rodgers [child]
CASELOW Wilhelmina
CASEY Cathleen
CASEY Lucy
CASEY May
CASHIN Elizabeth
CASHMAN Fanny
CASHMAN Johanna
CASSELL Violet Sarah
CASSELS Eileen Martha
CASSON Sarah
CASTLE Alice
CATHCART Amy
CAULFIELD .. (daughter of Catherine CAULFIELD of Sydney)
CAVANAGH Annie
CAVANAGH Arthur Daniel [child]
CERVETTO Mary
CHADWICK Albert Arthur [child]
CHADWICK Olivia Millicent Lydia
CHAMBERLAIN Annie
CHAMBERS Florence
CHANTLER Jean
CHAPMAN Ada
CHAPMAN Emma
CHAPMAN Hilda Mary
CHARDON Dorien
CHARLES Desmond Bruce [child]
CHARLES Doris Kathleen
CHARLES Mary
CHARLESTON Amy Pearl May
CHARLESWORTH Constance
CHARLTON Annie (Mrs)
CHASE Mona
CHELLINGSWORTH Eda Myrtle
CHIDGEY Ellen
CHILDERLEY Ivy Myrtle [child]
CHILDERLEY William James [child]
CHISHOLM Anna
CHISHOLM Annie
CHIVERS Sarah
CHRISTENSEN .. (daughter of Neils CHRISTENSEN)
CHRISTENSEN Kristine Elsie
CHRISTMAS Daisy
CHURCH Beatrice
CHURCH Helena Mary
CLAMPETT Gertrude
CLAMPITT Phillis Alele
CLANAHAN Jessie
CLANCY Esther
CLANCY Esther
CLANCY Mary
CLARK Alice Eliz Maud
CLARK Bessie Irene
CLARK Charlotte
CLARK Helen
CLARK Margaret Daisy
CLARK Mary Alice
CLARK Mary M
CLARKE Agnes
CLARKE Albert William [child]
CLARKE Alice May
CLARKE Coronetta Frances
CLARKE Elizabeth
CLARKE Eva
CLARKE Frances
CLARKE Grace
CLARKE Henrietta
CLARKE Isabella
CLARKE Jessie
CLARKE Laura
CLARKE Lena
CLARKE Louisa
CLARKE Margaret
CLARKE Mary
CLARKE Mary A
CLARKSON Margaret
CLARSON Mary Alice Ann
CLAXTON Martha
CLAY Elizabeth Jane
CLAYTON Alice
CLAYTON Eliza
CLEAVE Myrtle Martha Elizabeth
CLEGG Tamar
CLIFFORD Margaret
CLIFTON Henrietta
CLOSSEY Margaret
CLUDGEY Eliza Ellen
COAD Annie
COCHRANE Catherine
COCHRANE Eliza J
COCHRANE Hilda
COCHRANE Maggie
COCHRANE Margaret
COCHRANE Mary Stark
COCKAIGNE Emily
COCKBURN Jean
COCKING Maria
COCKS Jane Bennett
CODD Mabel
COFFEE Bridget (see COFFEY)
COFFEY Bridget
COGGINS Louisa
COGHLAN Alice
COGHLAN Annie
COGHLAN Lily
COHEN Janet
COLAHAN Mercie Mary
COLBY Ada
COLE Catherine
COLEMAN Caroline T
COLEMAN Sarah
COLLING Mary Jane
COLLINGS Kate
COLLINS Alma May
COLLINS Elizabeth
COLLINS Ernest Frank [child]
COLLINS Hilda Grace
COLLINS Jean
COLLINS Leila
COLLINS Mabel
COLLINS Maria
COLLINS Martha
COLLINS Mary
COLLINS Mary
COLLINS Sarah
COLLINS Sophia
COLLINS Susan
COLLINSON Jane
COLLOCOTT Emily
COLTON Elsie
COLVILLE Isabella
COMERFORD Alice
COMMINS Catherine
CONINGSBY Hilda
CONLON John McManus [child]
CONN Mary
CONNAUGHTON Bridget
CONNAUGHTON Rose Anne E
CONNELL Honorah Maria
CONNELL Mary Ellen
CONNELL Mary Ellen
CONNELLY Anne
CONNELLY Eilen
CONNELLY Lucinda
CONNELLY Margaret
CONNELLY Millie
CONNER Mary
CONNOLLY Elizabeth Barbara
CONNOLLY Ellen
CONNOR Edith [child]
CONNOR John Edward [child]
CONNOR Julia
CONNOR Kathleen
CONNOR Mary
CONNOR Susannah [child]
CONNORS Mary
CONNORS Mary
CONNORS Mary
CONRY Annie
CONSEDINE Ellen
CONSTANCE Annie
CONWAY Elizabeth
CONWAY Minnie
COOEY Annie Louisa
COOK Alice
COOK Annie
COOK Mary
COOKE Cyrilla M E
COOKE Stella
COOMBES Ellen
COOPER Beatrice
COOPER Edith Evelyn
COOPER Fanny
COOPER Violet M M [child]
COPELAND Norah
CORBETT Bridget Eliza
CORBETT Rose
CORBETT Ruby May
CORKILL Edna Dorothy Mary
CORNEY Jessie Matilda
CORNEY Violet
CORNISH Emma
CORRY Madge Margaret
CORTES Myrtle
CORY Lilian Maud
COSTA Louisa L
COTTERELL Elizabeth C
COTTERILL Elizabeth C (see COTTERELL)
COTTRELL Annie
COUGHLAN Mary
COULTHARD Alice
COURTNEY Ada
COUSER Evelyn
COUSINS Ruby
COWAN Rosanna
COX .. (daughter of Mrs A W COX of Lindenow)
COX Ellen
COX Emma
COX Ethel Marjorie
COX Mary Jane
COX Mary Jane
COYNE Elizabeth Elmer Mary
COYNE Kathleen
CRAFTON William [child]
CRAIG Sarah
CRANEY Bridget
CRANING Maud
CRANNY Bridget
CRAVEN Margaret Jane
CRAWFORD Gladys
CRAWFORD Janet
CRAWFORD Margaret Ellen
CRAWFORD Olive Wheeler [child]
CREED Ethel
CREED Ethel
CREED Ethel Lily
CREEN Mary M
CREGAN Betsy
CRIBB Margaret Veronica
CRICHTON Jeanne Frances
CRIPPIN Ann
CROCKER Louisa
CROCKETT Isabel
CROMBIE Ellen Grace
CROMPTON Annie
CROMPTON Elizabeth Mary
CROMPTON Maggie
CROMPTON Mary Ann
CRONE Jane
CROOKE Myrtle Eileen
CROSS Edith May
CROSS Sarah
CROSSAN Margaret
CROSSAN Margaret Jane
CROSSINGHAM Jane
CROSSINGHAM Jane
CROSSLEY Mary Ann
CROW Anne
CROWE Alice
CROWE Annie
CROWLEY .. (daughter of Matthew CROWLEY)
CRUSE Winifred Alice May
CRUST Vera Ivy
CUELL Desmond [child]
CUFF Rose
CULLEN Anne
CULLEN Mary
CULLEN Mary Ann
CULLEN May
CULVERHOUSE Emma Harriet
CUMMINS Louisa
CUNLIFFE Alice
CUNNINGHAM Annie
CUNNINGHAM Helen Isabella Beatrice
CUNNINGHAM Margaret
CUNNINGHAM Robinson Russell [child]
CUNNINGHAM Sarah
CUNNINGTON Agnes Mary (see LAUCHLAN Agnes Mary)
CUPPLES Lylie
CURRIE Eliza
CURRY Margaret
CURTHOYS Elizabeth Narrican
CUTTS Elsie
How to get copies

DAHTLER Allan Thomas [child]
DAHTLER Rosina
DAHTLER Sophia
Daisy (part Aboriginal)
DALE Ellen
DALE Ethel May
DALE Margaret
DALEY Annie
DALEY Irene May
DALEY Sarah
DALY Bridget
DALY Ellen
DALZIEL Emma
DAMIANOVITCH Marianna
DAMINOVEITCH Marianna
DANAHER Ellen
DANIELS Maud
DANN Nellie Irene
DARCY Annie
DARE Ethel
DARR Gladys
DART Elizabeth Ann
DART Florence Margaret
DAVEY Kate
DAVIDSON Eileen
DAVIDSON Emma Lawson
DAVIDSON Sarah
DAVIE John Henry Clarence [child]
DAVIE Mary Ann
DAVIE Susan
DAVIES .. (Miss about 1906)
DAVIES Agnes
DAVIES Blanche
DAVIES Caroline
DAVIES Clara
DAVIES Eileen
DAVIES Ethel
DAVIES Mary Ann
DAVIES Minnie
DAVIS Agnes
DAVIS Agnes
DAVIS Amelia
DAVIS Blanche (see DAVIES)
DAVIS Ellen
DAVIS Hannah
DAVIS Ida
DAVIS Minnie Theresa
DAVIS Ronald John [child]
DAVIS Rosa
DAVIS Winifred
DAW Jean
DAWES Mary Violet
DAWSON Elizabeth
DAWSON Mary
DAY Lilian Rose
DAY Lizzie
DEAGAN Agnes
DEAL Ruby Amelia
DEAN Flora Nora
DEAN Lily
DEAN Lucy Emma
DEEGAN Marjorie Marscella
DEEN Jane
DEEN Jane Vivian
DEERING Janie
DELAHUNTY Elizabeth Mary
DELLER Florence
DEMICK Louisa
DEMPSEY Mary
DENHAM Alice Josephine
DENNETT Constance Myrtle
DENNIS Elizabeth
DENNIS Elsie
DENTON Ivy Myrtle
DERRICK Eliza
DERRICK Harriet A
DERWIN Minnie Elizabeth
DESCHAMPS Doris Emily
DEVANEY Kathleen Agnes
DEVERS Lilian Elizabeth
DEVINEY Annie
DIAMOND Annie
DIAMOND Margaret
DIAMOND Rose Ellen
DIBLEY Ethel May
DICK Lilian Jane
DICKSON Frances
DICKSON Jessie
DICKSON Margaret Victoria
DICKSON Mary
DIGNAM Athol Lawrence [child]
DIGNEY Mary Jane
DILLON Kathleen
DINNEENE Mary
DIX Flora Rose [child]
DIXON Ada
DIXON Elizabeth
DIXON Elsie Clara
DIXON Elsie Clara
DIXON Ernest [child]
DOBBIN Maud Veronica
DOBIKIN Margaret
DOBIKIN Mary Anne [child]
DOBSON Ellen Jane
DOBSON Margaret
DOCKERY Louisa
DODDS Katie
DODSON Daisy
DODSON Lyllie
DODSON Maud
DOHERTY Bridget
DOHERTY Catherine
DOHERTY Georgina Bride
DOHERTY Kate
DOHERTY Mary Kate
DOHERTY Sarah
DOLAN Doris Catherine
DOLAN Margaret
DOLBY Ada Grace
DONALD Adelaide Isabella
DONALD Harriet
DONALDSON Maria
DONALDSON Mary
DONIGAN Maria
DONISCH Magdalene
DONNELLY Bridget
DONNELLY Helen (or Helena)
DONNELLY Helena (see Helen)
DONNELLY John [child]
DONNELLY May
DONNELLY Nelly
DONOGHUE Caroline Frances
DONOHUE Margaret
DONOVAN Anne
DONOVAN Bridget
DONOVAN Catherine
DONOVAN Mary
DOOLAN Catherine Rosannah
DOOLAN Ellen
DOOLEY Mary Jane
DORAN Alice Charlotte
DORMAN Ellen
DORMAN Rose Elizabeth
DOSETTO Margaret Catherine
DOUCH Margaret
DOUGHERTY Gladys May
DOUGLAS Annie
DOUGLAS Beatrice
DOUGLAS Christina
DOUGLASS A
DOVETT Myrtle Ruth
DOWLING Mary
DOWNING Elizabeth Louisa
DOWNING Florance
DOWNING Mary
DOWSE Ellen May
DOXEY Sophia Jane
DOYLE Agnes
DOYLE Elizabeth
DOYLE Ellen
DOYLE Mary Josephine
DRAIN Vera Nestor
DRAPER Charlotte
DRAPER Daisy Ethel May
DREW Ada Ann
DREW Florence Margaret
DRISCOLL Catherine A
DROCHMANN Hettie
DRUMMOND Annie
DUCK Olive May Ruby
DUDDEN May
DUFFY Mary Ann
DUFFY Rebecca
DUGGAN Jane
DUNBAR George [child]
DUNCAN Hilda Florence
DUNDON Molly
DUNIGAN Margaret
DUNKLEY Mary Ann
DUNLOP Eileen
DUNLOP Eileen
DUNLOP Janet
DUNN Bella
DUNN Bridget
DUNN Ellen
DUNN Ida Ellen Dorothy
DUNN Johanna
DUNN Sarah Maria
DURBRIDGE Alfred William [child]
DURBRIDGE Alfred William [child]
DURBRIDGE Frederick Douglas [child]
DURBRIDGE Stanley John [child]
DURBRIDGE Stanley John [child]
DURBRIDGE Svena Frederick Douglas [child]
DURHAM Lily
DWYER Bridget
DYER Jessie Florence May
DYER Maud
DYER Maud Ellen
DYSON Gladys Joyce
DYSON Josephine [child]
DYSON Lila May [child]
How to get copies

EARDMAN Elizabeth Cecelia
EASTMAN Mary Jane Ellen
EASTMENT Laura Ellis [child]
EASTON May
EATHER Florence Harriet
ECCLES Sarah Jane
EDAR Elizabeth
EDEBOHLS Amy
EDEBOHLS Florence
EDGE Ann
EDGE Daisy
EDGLEY Emily
EDNEY Eliza
EDSER Lily Jane
EDWARDS Annie
EDWARDS Eliza
EDWARDS Ellen
EDWARDS Esther
EDWARDS Louisa
EDWARDS Mary
EDWARDS Pearl
EGAN Anne
EGAN Eva Elizabeth
EGAN Honora
EGAN Jessie
EGAN Maria
EGAN Mary M
EIRNSPORN Johana Pauline
ELDRIDGE Hazel
ELFVERSON Elizabeth
ELFVERSON Roy Edward [child]
ELKINGTON Freda Marian
ELLEMENT Mary
ELLIOTT Eva
ELLIOTT Flora Agnes
ELLIOTT Jean
EMBERY Mavis
EMBREY Mavis Sylvian
EMERY Catherine Mary
EMMERTON Edith (or Ethel)
EMMERTON Ethel (see EMMERTON Edith)
EMMS Mary May Stewart
EMOND Ellen Isabella
ENGERT Margaret Mathilde
ENGLAND Sarah
ENGLISH Ivy May
ENGLISH Mary
ENNIS Nellie Philomene
ENOCH Joyce
ENTWISTLE Ann
EVANS Josephine
EVANS Julia Mabel
EVANS Maria
EVANS May Frances
EVANS Sarah
EVANS Sarah Jane
EVANSON Annie
EVETTS Janet
EYRES Mary Ann
How to get copies

FABIAN Amelia
FADDIE Mary Jane
FAGG Thelma
FAHEY Margaret
FAHEY Mary O
FAHEY Nellie
FAIRBANKS Hilda Grace
FAIRS Elizabeth
FALLON Alice
FALLON Emmaline
FAME Letitia
FARMER Maggie
FARRAR Jessie Maud
FARRER Ellen
FARROW Jessie
FAULDER Doris Clarette
FAULKNER Thomas Joseph [child]
FEHR Edith
FELLOWS Elizabeth
FENLEY Jean Harriet
FENNESSY Ann
FENNESSY Ann
FEREDAY Muriel
FERGUSON Jessie Jane
FERGUSON Mary
FERGUSON Nellie
FERNANDEZ Constance
FERNANDO Caroline
FERRIER Isabella
FERRIS Mary A
FERRIS Shirley Rae [child]
FIDDLER Lucinda
FIELD Bertha
FINCH Lillian May
FINCHER Lily
FINDLEY Catherine Ellen
FINLAY Elizabeth
FISHER Eileen Victoria
FISHER Emily
FISHER Maude
FITES Desmond Michael James [child]
FITZGERALD Dorothea Ernstine
FITZGERALD Dorothy Annie ? [child]
FITZGERALD Ellie
FITZGERALD Gladys Adelaide
FITZGERALD Margaret Cecilia [child]
FITZGERALD Nellie
FITZGIBBON Catherine Mary
FITZMAURICE Elizabeth
FITZMORRIS Margaret [child]
FITZPATRICK Annie
FITZPATRICK Ethel
FITZPATRICK Margaret
FITZPATRICK Margaret
FITZPATRICK Mary
FLANAGAN Emma
FLANERY Louisa ?
FLANNAGAN Jane
FLANNIGAN Margaret
FLEINER Kathleen Lilian
FLEMING Matilda
FLETCHER Alice
FLETCHER Maud
FLINT Stephen Lawrence [child]
FLINT Thelma Frances
FLOOD Georgina Bride (see DOHERTY)
FLOYD Elizabeth
FLOYD Mary
FLYNN Johanna M
FLYNN Kate
FLYNN May
FOLEY Louisa
FOLEY Mary
FOLEY Rebecca
FOOT Eliza E
FORBES Margaret
FORDE Violet Veronica [child]
FOREST Margaret
FORESTER Emma
FORREST Maud
FOSTER Margaret Catherine
FOUNTAIN Annie
FOX Doris Elsie
FOX Ruby
FOXLEY Sarah Ann
FRAHER Ciss
FRANCIS Alice Florence
FRANCIS Catherine Ellen
FRANCIS Elizabeth
FRANCIS Elizabeth
FRANCIS Lily
FRANCIS Myrtle Irene
FRANCIS Rhoda Jane
FRANCIS Rhoda Jane
FRANK Winifred
FRANKLIN May
FRANKS Beryl
FRASER Ada (see FRAZER)
FRASER Agnes
FRASER Alice Marie
FRASER Alicia Edna [child]
FRASER Catherine Margaret
FRASER Ella
FRASER Emily
FRASER Etta Hermina
FRASER Maria
FRASER Olive Ann
FRATER Isabella Agnes
FRAZER Ada
FRAZER Annie
FRAZER Gladys
FREDRICKSON Kathleen
FREEMAN Eleanor Inez
FREEMAN Jane Johanna
FRENCH Elizabeth Esther
FRENCH Lillian Maud
FRITH Annie Louisa
FRITH Emily
FRITH Fanny
FRITH Louisa
FROST Eliza
FROST Elizabeth Emily Josephine
FRY Barbara
FRY Ethel Maud
FRY Margaret
FRY Nellia
FULLER Alice
FULTON Lily Maud
FURLONG Mary Harriet
FYFE Margaret
How to get copies

GADSBY Amelia
GALL Ellen Frances
GALLAGHER Alice
GALLAGHER Annie
GALLAGHER Charles [child]
GALLAGHER Eliza
GALLAGHER Mary
GALLEY Lilian May (see GATLEY)
GALLOWAY Ethel
GALVIN Eliza Frances
GARDINER Elizabeth
GARDINER Martha
GARDINER Mary
GARDINER Myrtle Amy [child]
GARDNER Emily
GAREGHTY Maria
GARGAN Bridget
GARLAND Caroline Jane
GARLAND Edith May
GARLOCK Rosa F
GARNETT Ruby Victoria
GARNUCH Harriet
GARRARD Emily
GARRARD Emma
GARRARD William C [child]
GARTH Elsie
GASTON Brian [child]
GASTON Vivien
GATES Laura
GATLEY Lilian May
GATLEY Lillie Victoria
GEARY Elizabeth
GEDDINS Maud
GEISTER H E (Miss in South Australia)
GELDING Amy Emily
GELHERT Ada
GELL Miriam Maud
GENNINGS Charlotte
GEORGE Annie
GEORGE Emma
GEORGE Fanny
GEORGE Florence Helena
GEORGE Susan Jane
GIBBON Grace Maud
GIBSON Barbara Ellen Grace
GIBSON Dorothy Edith
GIBSON Ethel May
GIBSON Jane
GIBSON Sarah Ann
GIBSON Sydney Cecil [child]
GIDDINS Bridget May
GIDDY Mary
GIDNEY Margaret
GIFFNEY Julia
GILBERT Lucy
GILBERT Lydia
GILCHRIST Elizabeth Ellen
GILES Matilda
GILL Caroline
GILL Myrtle Jessie
GILLESPIE Alice
GILLIN Annie
GILLIS May
GILMORE May Jane
GILMOUR Florence Bradshaw
GINNANE Annie
GLEESON Catherine
GLEESON Hannorah
GLEESON Kate
GLEESON Mary Ann
GLOVER Emily Jane
GLOVER Louise Adelene Frances Fowler
GOLD Margaret
GOLD Margaret
GOLDBOLD Eliza Jane
GOLDENSTEIN Caroline
GOLDER Dorothy Jean [child]
GOLDSMITH Maria Ann
GOLDSWORTHY Agnes Rubina
GOLL Rebecca Bertha
GOLLAN Agnes Bonita Fisher
GOOD Eliza
GOODA Lily Eliza
GOODMAN Veronica [child]
GOODYER Margaret
GOORLEY Pearlie
GORDON Eileen Mary
GORDON Eileen May
GORDON Eliza
GORDON Mabel Gwenneth
GORE Beatrice
GORLICK Hilda Matilda
GORMAN Lydia
GORMLY Margaret
GOSS Emily
GOUGH Amelia Maud
GOUGH Rachel
GOUGH Thomas Erskine
GOULD Mary
GOURD Elizabeth Anstis
GOW Georgina
GOW Ivy
GOW Rosie
GRACE Mary Jane
GRACE Nina
GRADY Nellie Ellen
GRAHAM Annie
GRAHAM Catherine Ellen
GRAHAM Constance
GRAHAM Eden
GRAHAM Margaret
GRAHAM Myrtle Jean
GRAHAM Priscilla
GRANDIN May [child]
GRANT Barbara
GRANT Doris May [child]
GRANT Ethel
GRANT Frances E
GRANT Laura Amelia
GRANT Mary
GRANT Reginald Charles [child]
GRAVES Elizabeth ? (see GREAVES)
GRAY Alice
GRAY Irene Myrtle
GRAY Jenny
GRAY John [child]
GRAY Olive
GRAY Priscilla
GREASBACH Margaret ? (see Margaret BUCHANAN)
GREAVES Elizabeth
GREEK Theresa Angelina Alice
GREEN Ada Sophia
GREEN Edward Cecil [child]
GREEN Ellen Margaret
GREEN Hannah
GREEN Henrietta Sarah
GREEN Kathleen
GREEN Mary
GREEN Mary
GREEN Mary
GREEN Millie
GREEN Sylvia [child]
GREENBURY Nellie Birdsall
GREENING Fanny
GREER Nellie
GREGG Frances Jane (see GREGG Francis Jane)
GREGG Francis Jane
GREGORY Frances Margaret
GREGORY Jessie Azubah
GREGSON Jack [child]
GREIG Selina
GRENBERGER Paulina
GREY Ann Seymour
GREY Sarah
GRICE Alice Mary
GRICE Alice Mary
GRIEVE Laura
GRIFFEN Maud
GRIFFIN Honora
GRIFFITH Harriet
GRIFFITHS Harriet May
GRIFFITHS Jane E
GROGAN Kathleen Lucy
GROGAN Reta
GROOM Elizabeth
GROSS B
GROSSMANN Henrietta
GROVES Alma Emily
GROVES Lydia
GRUBB Annie Selina
GUEST Alice
GUY Rosetta
How to get copies

HADDOCK Elizabeth
HAGGAR Mary Elizabeth
HAGSTROM Edith Mary
HAGUE Elizabeth
HAGUE Elizabeth
HAHN Amelia
HAHN Ottilia Amelia (see HAHN Amelia)
HAILSTONES Henrietta
HALES Bessie
HALL Ada May
HALL Beatrice Maud
HALL Doris Madeline
HALL Elizabeth Alice
HALL Jane
HALL Violet May
HALLETT Ella Elizabeth
HALLIDAY .. (Miss of Solomontown)
HALLIWELL Rose
HALLORAN Norah
HALLS Annie
HALPIN Elizabeth
HALS Elizabeth
HAMANN Adelaide
HAMES Marion
HAMILL Mary Elizabeth Ann
HAMILTON Caroline
HAMILTON Eliza
HAMILTON Ethel
HAMILTON Janet Strang
HAMILTON Mary
HAMILTON Nellie B
HAMILTON Sydney Henry [child]
HAMLET Vera ?
HAMMEL Connie
HAMMILL Margaret Theresa
HAMPDEN Ethel
HAMPSON Amy Florence
HANCK Alice A
HAND Harriett
HAND Jessie
HANDLEY Sarah
HANLEY Ellen
HANMER Jane Elizabeth
HANNAFORD Caroline
HANNAN Edna Serrace
HANNAN Margaret Mary
HANNAN Susan
HANNIFEY Margaret
HANRAHAN Bridget
HANSELL Linda
HANSEN Emma
HANSEN Lena
HANSEN Lillia
HANSON Catherine
HAOLOW Hannah ? (see HARLOW Hannah)
HARATMANN Wilhelmina
HARBOUR Annie
HARD Pauline
HARDING Elizabeth
HARDING Eva
HARDING Grace
HARDING Maud May
HARDSMAN Maud Evelyn [child]
HARDTMANN Wilhelmina
HARDY Bridget
HARFIELD Myrtle Jane
HARGAN Adelaide B
HARGAN Raymond Francis Leslie [child]
HARKENSEE Hilda Vera [child]
HARLOW Annie
HARLOW Hannah
HARLOW Mary Ann
HARMER John Francis [child]
HARNEY Philomena May
HARPER Annie
HARPER Sarah
HARRIES Ellen Mary Henrietta
HARRIES Rita Gwendoline [child]
HARRIGAN Mary
HARRINGTON Mary
HARRIS Ada
HARRIS Anne Elizabeth
HARRIS Annie
HARRIS Annie Elizabeth [child]
HARRIS Blanche
HARRIS Eliza Jane
HARRIS Elizabeth
HARRIS Ella
HARRIS Ellen
HARRIS Epreicene
HARRIS Ethel Ellen Gordon
HARRIS Hazel Vera
HARRIS James Herbert [child]
HARRIS Mary
HARRIS Pearl
HARRIS Queenie May
HARRIS Selina
HARRISON Doris May
HARRISON Ellen
HARRISON Ellen
HARRISON Matilda
HARROWFIELD Gwenneth Gertrude
HART Annie
HART Edith
HART Emily
HART Myrtle Madge
HARTLEY Louisa
HARVEY Bessie
HARVEY Maria
HARVEY Sarah
HASEMAN .. (daughter of Mrs Maria HASEMEN)
HASTY Euphemia
HATELY Mary Boyd
HATHAWAY Annie
HAUENSCHILD Dora Eileen
HAUGHLEY Kate
HAUGHNEY Mary
HAUGHTON Jane
HAWKESFORD Elsie
HAWKINS Minnie
HAY Annie Millicent
HAYDEN Mary
HAYES Alice
HAYES Ellen
HAYES Ellen
HAYES Frederick [child]
HAYES Olive May
HAYES Phoebey
HAYLOCK Mary
HAZELL Mary Ann
HEALEY Elsie
HEALY Florence
HEALY Margaret
HEALY Sarah
HEAPHY Margaret Mary
HEARD Lydia M
HEARNE Edith
HEATON Lily
HEAVYSIDE Grace
HEBBERT Emma B
HEBERMAN Agnes
HECKER Alice May
HEDINGTON Ernest Arthur [child]
HEDINGTON Selina
HEDLEY Jane
HEEB Mary
HEEL Margaret Ellen
HEENEY Mary Cecelia
HEFFERNAN Mary Ann
HEFFERNON Mary
HEGARTY Catherine
HEGARTY Lizzie
HEGARTY May
HEHRMANN Elizabeth
HEID Louisa
HEIRETT Lottie Kate
HELMOND Beatrice
HELSHAM Ellen Rose
HELSHAM Patricia Beryl [child]
HEMMING Nellie Muriel
HEMPENSTALL Kathleen
HEMSLEY Mary
HENDERSON Anne Maria
HENDERSON Elizabeth Pryor
HENDERSON Isabella
HENDON Elizabeth
HENNESSEY Mary
HENNESSEY Ruby Francis
HENNESSY Lily
HENNESSY Louisa
HENNESSY Nellie
HENNINGSEN Violet Annie
HENRY Elsie
HENRY Margaret
HEPBURN Jane Ann
HERBERT Ellen
HERBERT Paul [child]
HERD Amy
HERDING Myrtle
HERN Ellen
HERRENBERG Madge Ursula Ellinora
HERRMANN Elizabeth
HERRMANN Myrtle
HERRON Mona Ann
HESLEHURST Muriel Isabel
HESSE Elizabeth
HETHERINGTON Elsie Catherine
HEWLETT Mary
HIBBERSON Alice
HIBBERT Ethel Maud
HIBBERT Mary
HICKEY Catherine
HICKEY Elizabeth
HICKFORD Elizabeth Ann
HICKS Elizabeth Jane
HICKS Emmie
HICKS Priscilla
HICKS Priscilla
HICKS Sybil [child]
HIDE Lillian Edith
HIGGINS Elizabeth [child]
HIGGINS Maria
HIGGINS Mary Ellen
HIGGINSON Thelma Veronica [child]
HILL Annie
HILL Catherine
HILL Dorothy Martha
HILL Edith
HILL Ellen Briscoe
HILL Ethel
HILL Ethel E
HILL Florence
HILL Florence Mabel
HILL Maud
HILL Nellie
HILL Ruby Violet
HILL Sarah
HILL William Victor [child]
HILLARN Elizabeth
HILLIER Emily Mary
HILLS Lilian Violet
HIMSTEDT Douglas Roy [child]
HIMSTEDT May
HINCH Teckla
HINDON Elizabeth (see HENDON)
HINDS Theresa
HINE Violet Isabella
HINES Joan Mavis
HISKINS Cecilia Mary
HITCHCOCK Violet
HITCHES Annie Elizabeth
HOARE Lily
HOBBS Agnes Matilda
HOBBS Wilhelmina
HOCKEY Louisa
HOCKING Ida
HOCKINGS Emily
HODGE Elizabeth
HODGES Mary Ann
HODGINS Susan
HODGKINSON Charlotte
HODGKINSON Mary Ann
HODKINSON Emilie
HOEFLER Bernhardina
HOFF Elizabeth
HOGAN Alice
HOGAN Bridget
HOGAN Nellie Mary P
HOGARTH Robina (see Robina VINCE)
HOHENHAUSE Rita
HOHENHAUSE Ronald [child]
HOHMANN Catherine Eva
HOLDEN Ivy
HOLDEN Margaret Helen
HOLDSWORTH Norah Oatway
HOLDSWORTH Rose
HOLLAND Mary
HOLLANDS Lily Elizabeth
HOLLIDAY Emma
HOLLINGSWORTH Nellie
HOLLINGWORTH Augusta
HOLMAN Annie
HOLMAN Caroline
HOLMAN Elsie May
HOLMAN Lucy
HOLMES Sarah
HOLT Elizabeth
HOLT Ruby
HOLYOAK Beatrice Maud
HOMANN Bella
HONG Beatrice May
HOOD Anne
HOOK Caroline
HOOPER Annie
HOOPER Elizabeth
HOPE Margaret
HOPE Mavis
HOPE Mavis
HOPKINS Mary Eveline
HORN Janet
HORNS Annie Dorothy
HORROLL Martha
HORSFALL Susannah
HORT Clara
HORTON Ada I
HOSBURGH Mary Jane
HOSE Harriet
HOSKIN Alice Matilda
HOSKING Mary
HOUGH Nellie Maud
HOUGHTON Elinore
HOUGHTON Eva Harriet
HOUGHTON Eva Harriett
HOUGHTON Evelyn Mary [child]
HOUGHTON Isabella
HOVEY Mavis Maud
HOWARD Amelia Matilda
HOWARD Frances Annie
HOWARD Margaret
HOWARD Mary
HOWARD Winniefred
HOWARTH Elizabeth Lydia
HOWELL Kate
HOWER Lucy
HOWLETT Annie Elizabeth
HOY Frances
HOYLE Emma A (Mrs)
HUBBARD Mary
HUBBARD Sarah Jane
HUDSON Alma Jean [child]
HUDSON Ruth Eileen
HUGHES Annie
HUGHES Bebe Alice
HUGHES Ilean
HUGHES Laura Beatrice
HUGHES Margaret
HUGHES Margaret
HUGHES Martha Isabel
HUGHES Olive
HUMPHRIES Hilda
HUNT Laurie Josephine Mary
HUNT Louisa
HUNTER Alice
HUNTER Ellen
HUNTER Isabella
HUNTER Margaret
HURD E (Mrs)
HURLEY Annie
HURLEY Maggie
HUTCHINS Ada
HUTCHINS Elizabeth
HUTCHINSON Clara
HUTCHISON Maud Mary (see JOHNSON Maud Mary)
HYDE Frances
How to get copies

IDDLES Sarah E
ILAND Margaret
IMPEY .. (daughter of Mrs Ada IMPEY)
IMPEY Doris
INGRAM Sophia
IRVINE Emily
IRWIN Ethel Mary
IRWIN Harriett
IRWIN Millie
IRWIN Ruby
IRWIN Ruby
ISBESTER Euphenna
ISLEY Ronda Kathleen
IVES Kevin Donald [child]
IVES Lily Beatrice Maud
How to get copies

JACK Agnes
JACK Christina
JACK Ethel May
JACKSON Agnes
JACKSON Eva
JACKSON Florence Estelle
JACKSON Marjorie [child]
JACKSON Mary Ellen
JACKSON May Vivian
JACKSON Nellie
JACOBS Catherine
JACOBSON Margaret
JAMES Dorothy Florence
JAMES Margaret
JAMES Mary
JAMES Mary
JAMES Muriel Gladys
JAMES Ruby
JAMIESON Agnes
JAMIESON Elsie
JARRETT Daisy
JEFFREY Alice
JEFFREY Elsie
JEFFRIE Florence May
JEFFRIES Christina
JEFFRY Clara
JEFFS Barbara [child]
JEFFS Valerie [child]
JEMESEN Beatrice Lelena
JEMESEN Kenneth Neil [child]
JENKINS Henrietta Ross
JENKINS Julia
JENKINS Mary
JENSEN Grace Florence
JERVIS-BUTTER Florence Evelyn
JESBERG Kate
JESSOP .. (daughter of S. JESSOP)
JESSOP Frances G
JOHNS Amelia
JOHNS Caroline
JOHNS Maud
JOHNS May
JOHNSON Albert Hawthorn [child]
JOHNSON Alice
JOHNSON Alice Maud
JOHNSON Annie Elizabeth
JOHNSON Charlotte
JOHNSON Eleanor Frances Godschal
JOHNSON Ethel Elsie
JOHNSON Florence Violet
JOHNSON Harriet
JOHNSON Lily May
JOHNSON Marion
JOHNSON Mary Jane
JOHNSON Maud Mary (later HUTCHISON)
JOHNSON Mildred
JOHNSON Priscilla
JOHNSON William [child]
JOHNSTON Agnes F [child]
JOHNSTON Annie
JOHNSTON Emma Matilda
JOHNSTON Florence
JOHNSTON Jane
JOHNSTON Jessie
JOHNSTON Margaret Joan [child]
JOHNSTON Mary Jane (see JOHNSON Mary Jane)
JOHNSTON May
JOHNSTONE Florence
JOHNSTONE Jessie
JOHNSTONE Nellie
JOHNSTONE Winifred Catherine
JONES Ada
JONES Arthur [child]
JONES Elizabeth
JONES Elizabeth Ann
JONES Emily
JONES Emma
JONES Florence Ada
JONES Hilda
JONES Jane
JONES Jane
JONES Jane (of Victoria)
JONES Jessie (NSW)
JONES Laura
JONES Lizzie
JONES Mary
JONES Mary
JONES Mary Ann
JONES Mary Cecilia
JONES Patricia [child ? related to Alice Ruby May JONES]
JONES Ruby Pearl
JONES Sarah Thelma
JONES Susan
JORGENSEN Maria
JOST Kate
JOYCE Hazel
JUDD Lilla
JUDD Verona Dennis [child]
JUDICIE Mary Ann
JUDSON Janie
JURGENS Hannah
JUSTICE Grace Evelyn
How to get copies

KAATZ Mavis Jean [child]
KACHEL Minnie Amelia
KADEY May
KAESER Edna Bertha
KAHL Frederick George [child]
KAHL Kate
KAJEWSKI .. (daughter of Christian KAJEWSKI )
KARAMISHEFF Luba
KAST Elizabeth
KATES Florence
KAY Eva Victoria
KEAM Elsie
KEANE Kathleen
KEANE Mary
KEARNEY Alma [child]
KEASLEY Minnie
KEAT Muriel I S
KEATES Doris May [child]
KEATS Nora Mae
KEEGAN May
KEELE Louisa
KELLAWAY Susan
KELLETT Ann
KELLS Matilda
KELLY .. (daughter of Mrs A. KELLY of Goodna)
KELLY .. [child at Stanthorpe]
KELLY Bernice Irene
KELLY Bridget
KELLY Delia
KELLY Emily
KELLY Kathleen
KELLY Margaret
KELLY Margaret
KELLY Margaret
KELLY Myrtle
KELLY Sarah
KELLY Sarah
KELLY Sarah
KELLY Sylvia Blanche
KELLY Winifred
KELSO Alice Helina
KENDALL Mary
KENEALLY Honorah (see Honora KENNEALLY)
KENLEY Lily
KENMAN Jessie
KENNA Anna Margaret
KENNEALLY Honora
KENNEDY Agnes
KENNEDY Annie
KENNEDY Catherine
KENNEDY Clara Madeline [child]
KENNEDY Ellen
KENNEDY Maggie
KENNEDY Margaret
KENNEDY Mary
KENNEDY May
KENNELLY Eileen
KENNELLY Nellie
KENNY Catherine
KENNY Catherine
KENNY Florence
KENT Evangeline Elizabeth
KEOGH Clara Jane
KEOGH Roland Trevor [child]
KERCHINER Dora
KERIN Jessie
KERR Elizabeth
KERR Ellen
KERR Elma Vera
KERR Maria Margaret
KERR Maria Margaret
KERR Mary
KERR Ruby
KERSTEN Franziska Martha
KERWIN Maria
KETSCHMANN Elizabeth
KEUNE .. (Miss)
KEY Mercy
KEYNES Edith May
KHANN Lena [child]
KIDDLE Benjamin [child]
KIELTY Kathleen [child]
KIELTY Nellie Ellen
KILLBRIDE Catherine
KILLYER Catherine
KILLYER Catherine Maud
KINEALLY Margaret
KING Annie Theresa
KING Evelyn Janee Florence
KING Ina
KING Iva
KING Mary Ann
KING Mary Anne
KING Thelma Phyllis
KINGSTON Irene Ruby
KINNON Ellen Rebecca
KIRBY Agnes Alice
KIRBY Elizabeth Ann
KIRBY Mary Ann
KIRBY Violet
KIRK Clorine
KIRK Elizabeth
KIRK Glorine
KIRKALDY Wilhelmina
KIRKHAM Annie
KIRWAN Annie
KIRWIN Maria (see KERWIN)
KLUCK Agnes
KLUVEN Frederika
KNEALE Wilson (Mrs)
KNEEBONE Ada
KNELL Jean
KNIGHT Bertha Crowdy [child]
KNIGHT Dorothy Beryl [child]
KNIGHT Etty Louisa
KNIGHT Harriet
KNIGHT Hester
KNIGHT Muriel Irene
KNOWLES Martha
KOLAN Theresa
KOSKY Rachael Deborah
KRAUSER Emily
KREIGHER Elizabeth D
KRIEGER Ellen
KRIEGER Ellen
KRUSE Ellen
KUDER Maud
KUGSER Louisa
KUHN Nellie
KUHR Kathleen
KULLDULLA Alma Mary Harrison
KUNST Selina
KURTZ Lottie
How to get copies

LA VELL Annie
LABATT Phillis
LACY Louisa Emma
LAMBERT Doreen [child]
LAMBERT Mary Ann
LAMBERT Rosamond
LANDRIGAN Catherine
LANDY Lillian Ruby Ames [child]
LANE Alice
LANE Amelia Eliza
LANE Eliza Jane
LANE Sarah Ann Eliz
LANESBURY Florence
LANG Nellie
LANGHAM Elizabeth
LANGHAM Nellie
LANGLEY Fanny
LANGLEY Ida
LARASSEY Kate
LARGE Jane
LARKEN Lillie
LARKIN Adeline
LARKING Adeline
LARKINS Jane
LARNEY Matilda Georgina
LATHAM Pearlie
LAU Annie
LAU Matilda
LAUCHLAN Agnes Mary
LAUGHLIN Margaret Mary
LAUGHLIN Mary
LAUNT Elizabeth
LAUNT Elizabeth Catherine
LAW .. (daughter of Mrs T LAW)
LAW M (Miss)
LAWFORD Jane
LAWLER Mary
LAWLER Phyllis
LAWLOR Irene
LAWLOR Kate
LAWRENCE Alice Ellen Mary
LAWRENCE Ellen
LAWRENCE Lucy
LAWRENCE Lucy
LAWSON Annie
LAWSON John [child NSW]
LAWSON Maggie
LAWSON Ruby Margaret
LAWTON Sarah
LAYCOCK Annie (Mrs)
LAYCOCK Rose
LAYTON Mary
LE BAS Lily
LE BLANC Winifred
LEAHAN Lillian Elizabeth
LEBER Metha
LEDGROVE Jane
LEDWIDGE Lilian May
LEE Charlotte E
LEE Elizabeth
LEE Elizabeth (Mrs)
LEE Marion
LEECH Elsie Elizabeth
LEECH Estella
LEES Margaret Rebecca
LEETH Susan (see LEITH)
LEGG Lillie
LEGGETT Laura Alice
LEGGETT Margaret
LEITCH William [child]
LEITH Elizabeth Ellen
LEITH Susan
LEITH Susan (or LUTH)
LEKLANE Lucy O M
LENARD Rose
LENNARD Emily
LENNERGAN Bridget
LEONARD Elizabeth
LEONARD Margaret
LEONARD Rosina
LETICQ Adelia
LETTE Lydia Filester
LEVER Elsie Pearl
LEVIP Martha
LEWIS Annie
LEWIS Doris
LEWIS Elizabeth
LEWIS Elizabeth S
LEWIS Eric [child]
LEWIS James Thomas [child]
LEWIS John [child]
LEWIS Lillian Jane [child]
LEWIS Malvina
LEWIS Martha
LEWIS Mary Ann
LEWIS Pearl
LIMBERG Doris May [child]
LIMBERG Louise
LINCOLN Elma [child]
LIND Gladys Emma
LIND Gladys Emma
LINDQUIST Frederick John [child]
LINDQUIST Mary Louisa
LINWOOD Gladys Maud
LIPPIATT May
LIPZKER Helena
LITTLE Beatrice May Gwendoline
LIVINGSTONE Elizabeth
LIVOCK Bessie [child]
LLOYD Alice
LLOYD Annie
LLOYD Mavis
LLOYD Sarah
LOCK Elizabeth Francis
LOCKWOOD Jessie
LODDING Gertrude
LOMAX Emily
LONDRIGAN Mary Kathleen
LONG Edith
LONSDALE Jane Alice
LOUCH Ellen Maria
LOVE Agnes
LOVE Alberta
LOVE Rachel
LOVE Sarah
LOVELL Rosina Francess
LOVELOCK Agnes
LOVERIDGE Florence May
LOWE Lily Hazel
LOWE Margaret
LOWE Mary
LOWE Millie
LOWERSON Lilian
LOWES Regina
LOWGINN Sarah Ann
LOYAL Beatrice
LUCAS Amelia
LUCAS Florence
LUKE Agnes Christina
LUKE Amelia
LUSCOMBE Emma
LUSK Flora
LUSK Mary Isabel [child]
LUTH Susan (see LEITH)
LYALL Catherine
LYE Emma
LYMER Dorothy
LYNCH Agnes
LYNCH Annie
LYNCH Marion Elizabeth
LYNE Kathleen
LYONS Margaret
LYONS Sarah Alice
LYTHAL .. (Mrs Albert)
LYTHGO Gertrude Sarah
How to get copies

McALISTER Emily
McALISTER Isabella
McALLISTER Winifred
McARTHUR Marion Margaret
McAULIFFE May (Mrs)
McBAIN Emma
McBERTY Mary
McBRIDE Isabella
McBRIDE Lena Elizabeth
McBURNEY Mary
McCABE Mary
McCABE Nettie
McCALL Margaret
McCALLUM Alice M M
McCALLUM Margaret
McCARTHY Bridget
McCARTHY Clara
McCARTHY Eva Agnes Bertha
McCARTHY Mary
McCLEFTY Agnes
McCLELLAN Alice
McCLUSKEY Linda
McCLUSKEY Teresa
McCOLL Ann
McCRACKEN Jane
McCRAE Ellen
McCREADY Elizabeth
McCUE Elizabeth
McCULLOCK Janet Margaret
McDERMOTT Lillian Maud
McDONALD Anne
McDONALD Bridget
McDONALD Donald Barwell [child]
McDONALD Ethel
McDONALD Faith
McDONALD Florence
McDONALD Isabella
McDONALD Isabella
McDONALD Julia
McDONALD Louisa Mary
McDONALD Margaret
McDONALD Mary
McDONALD Mary
McDONALD Ruby May
McDONALD Sarah
McDONOUGH Maria
McDOUGALL Elizabeth Nora
McDOUGALL Ivy Ellen
McEACHERN Janet
McEWAN Annie Marie
McEWAN Mary
McEWAN Matilda
McFARFLANE Millicent
McFARLANE Anna
McFARLANE Ellen
McFARLANE Ellen
McFARLANE Lillian Edith
McFARLANE Mary Agnes
McFARLANE Minnie
McFAUL Bridget
McGARVA Maggie Jane (living in Scotland)
McGAW Annie
McGILLIVRAY Sarah
McGILVERY William Cyril [child]
McGINTY Alice
McGOVERN Mary Ann
McGOWAN Alice Elizabeth
McGRATH Annie Hellena
McGRATH Eva
McGRATH Mary
McGREGOR Alice
McGREGOR Ellen
McGREGOR Jane
McGRORY Irene Mary
McGRORY Irene Mary
McGUIRE Mary
McHARG Grace
McILLWRICK Lillian
McILROY Florence
McINERNEY Mary
McINNES Barbara
McINNES Hannah
McINNES Marjorie Yoyce [child]
McINTOSH Dorothy
McINTYRE Annie
McINTYRE Mabel
McINTYRE Maria Isabella
McIVOR May
McKAY Alice
McKAY John Gordon [child]
McKAY Lily
McKAY Norman Donald [child]
McKECHNIE Jessie
McKEEVER Evelyn Mary
McKEMISH Annie
McKENNA Clara Elizabeth
McKENNA Flora
McKENNA Margaret
McKENZIE Martha
McKENZIE Meren Elizabeth
McKEON Emily Margaret
McKEOWN Alice
McKEOWN Isabella
McKEOWN Janet
McKEWIN Evelyn
McKEWYNEE Angelina
McKINNON Christina Mabel
McKINNON Jessie
McLAREN Beryl [child]
McLAREN Emily J
McLAREN Margaret
McLARTY Margaret
McLASHIN Barbara
McLAUGHLIN Ellen Edith
McLEAN .. (Miss of Geelong VIC)
McLEAN Agnes
McLEAN Catherine
McLEAN Ethel Jessie
McLEAN Flora
McLEANAN Susannah
McLEISH Helen
McLELLAN Marion
McLEOD Christina
McLEOD Mary Ann (widow)
McMAHON Annie
McMAHON Catherine
McMAHON Margaret Rose
McMANUS Jessie Mary
McMANUS Madge
McMANUS Sarah Ann
McMANUS Sarah Ann
McMILLAN Margaret J
McMULKIN Matilda Ellen
McNAIR Margaret
McNALLY Cecilia
McNAMARA Alice
McNAMARA Alice Agnes
McNAMARA Amelia
McNAMARA Florence
McNEILL Clara
McNEILL Sarah
McNIE Christina Elizabeth
McNULTY Vina Matilda
McPHEE Harriet
McPHERSON Elizabeth Mitchell
McPHERSON Gladson Mary
McPHERSON May
McQUEEN Helen
McRAE Mary
McSHANE Mary
McSHERRY Florence
McSWEENEY Bridget
McSWEENEY Clarice [child]
McSWEENEY Ella [child]
McSWEENEY Gladys [child]
How to get copies

MACKAY Alice Winifred
MACKAY Alice Winifred
MACKAY Jane Ada Gertrude [child]
MACKAY Margaret
MACKAY Sarah
MACKENZIE Isabella
MACKEY Hilda May
MACKLIN Eliza Mary
MACNAMARA Bridget
MACPHERSON Harriet Villieveine Priscilla
MACPHERSON Lily [child]
MADDEN Martha
MADDICK Louisa
MAGNER Catherine Victoria
MAGNER Louisa Minnie Margaret
MAGUIRE Ellen
MAHER Delia
MAHER Ellen
MAHERS Sarah
MAHONEY Bridget
MAHOOD Daisy
MAIDENS Minnie Edith
MALLEY Anne
MALONE Albert Edward [child]
MALONEY Agnes
MALONEY Agnes
MALONEY Emily
MALONEY Martha
MALONEY Mary
MALONY Mary
MANN Annie
MANN Daisy Victoria May
MANN Eliza Florence
MANN Hilda Maud
MANN Patricia Anne
MANNELL Rose E
MANNING Bessie Harrison [child]
MANNING Mary
MANNING Sarah
MANNIX Abigail
MANNTON Alice Ann Elizabeth
MANSELL Myrtle Annette
MANSKI Mary
MANTANN Elsie Mabel
MAQUIRE Bridget
MARA Sarah
MARBARDI Mary
MARKWELL Florence
MARMS Ethel Maud ?
MARNS Ellen Maud ?
MARONEY Ellen
MARR Eunice
MARRIOTT Emily Jean
MARSH Esmie
MARSH Joyous Jarrett
MARSHALL Elsie Margaret
MARSHALL Ida Jane
MARSHALL Mary Margaret
MARSHALL Mary May
MARSTON Millicent Edith
MARTENS Eva Elizabeth Margaret
MARTIN Alice
MARTIN Alice
MARTIN Annie Elizabeth
MARTIN Catherine
MARTIN Emily
MARTIN Ethel
MARTIN Gertrude
MARTIN Jessie
MARTIN Jessie Annetta
MARTIN Maggie
MARTIN Margaret
MARTIN Margaret
MARTIN Margaret
MARTIN Mary Ann
MARTIN May Josephine
MARTIN Minnie
MARTIN Peter Glen [child]
MARTIN Sylvia
MARTIN Veronica
MARTINI Pearl Daisy Eileen
MARTYN Mary Jane
MARTYR Annie
MASNADA .. (daughter of Emilio MASNADA)
MASON Alice
MASON Annie
MASON Ellen Jane
MASON Emily Annie
MASON William Thomas [child]
MASSAM .. (daughter of Mrs Max MASSAM)
MASSEY Gertrude
MATTHEWS Caroline
MATTHEWS Ellen Trembath
MATTHEWS Jane
MATTHEWS Lilian Eva
MATTHEWS Mary (of Manilla NSW)
MATTRAM Anne
MAWER May
MAXFIELD Christina
MAXWELL Jane
MAXWELL May
MAY Alice
MAY Ethel
MAY Jean Barbara
MAY Margaret
MAY Margaret
MAY Mary Jane
MAYES Jean [child]
MAYNE Elizabeth Matilda
MAYNE Mary
MAZZENTO Lena
MEAD Isabella
MEDLIN Esther Jane
MEE Rita
MEEHAN Emmeline
MEEHAN Kathleen
MEEHAN Norah
MEEN Esther
MEGGS Mabel
MELBOM Hulda
MELKSHAM Iris Sybil
MELLOR Jessie E
MELVILLE Elizabeth
MELVILLE Elizabeth
MEMMOTT Emily
MEREDITH Harriet Ruby
MEREDITH Theresa (see HINDS Theresa)
MERRITT Mary Ellen
MERRITT Maud
MERRY Cedric Henry [child]
MESSENGER Lilian Rose (see Lilian Rose DAY)
MEYERS Alvina Jane
MIDDLETON Elizabeth
MIDDLETON Henry Robinson [child]
MIDDLETON Nellie
MIERS Bessie
MILGATE Elizabeth
MILHAM Lily
MILLAR Grace
MILLARD Alice
MILLARD Kathleen I
MILLARD Kathleen Isabella
MILLER Charlotte
MILLER Ethel
MILLER Lena A
MILLER Mary
MILLER Maud Lillian Clare
MILLER Millie
MILLER Rebecca
MILLER Sarah Jane
MILLIN Elizabeth Ann
MILLS Elizabeth Gertrude
MILLS Ethel May
MILLS Mabel Pearl [child]
MILLS Minnie
MILLS Sarah
MILNER Annie Elizabeth
MILVERTON Lucy
MINEHAN James P [child]
MINER William [child]
MINORE Mary
MITCHAM Agnes
MITCHELL Alice
MITCHELL Alice Josephine
MITCHELL Annie
MITCHELL Annie Elizabeth
MITCHELL Joan
MITCHELL May
MITCHELL Theresa
MITCHELLHILL Lizzie
MODINI Eva ?
MOLLER Hazel Constance
MOLLOY Bridget May
MOLONEY Clarice Agnes
MOMSEN Elizabeth
MONGU Mary Ann
MONTGOMERY Alexina
MONTGOMERY Anna
MONTGOMERY Colin Henry [child]
MOONEY Georgina Barbara
MOONEY Maggie
MOORCROFT Lily
MOORE Annie
MOORE Arthur Joseph [child]
MOORE Barbara
MOORE Dolly
MOORE Dolly
MOORE Dolly
MOORE Frances
MOORE Ivan [child]
MOORE J (Miss of NSW)
MOORE Katherine
MOORE Katherine
MOORE Margaret Jane (Mrs)
MOORE Mary
MOORE Mary
MOORE Mary Dorothy
MOORE Minnie
MOORE Minnie
MOORE Myra Mabel
MOORE Myrtle Elizabeth
MOORE Rebecca
MOORES Gertrude Dorothy
MOORES Lily
MOORES Olive
MORAN Annie C
MORAN Hetty
MORAN Mary
MORAN Mary
MORCAN Mary
MORGAN Cecilia ?
MORGAN Ellen
MORGAN Evelyn
MORGAN Mary
MORGAN Mary Ann
MORGAN Mary Ann
MORGAN Mervyn George [child]
MORGAN Millie
MORGAN Sarah Jane
MORLEY Alice
MORLEY Violet
MORONEY Eric Joseph [child]
MORONEY Mary Clare
MORRELL Nessie
MORRELL Nesta
MORRIS Ellen
MORRIS Harriet
MORRIS Harriet
MORRIS Harriett A
MORRIS Harriet Isabel
MORRIS Margaret
MORRIS Maud
MORRIS Susannah
MORRISEY Mary Ellen
MORRISON Daisy
MORRISSEY Alice
MORRISSEY Elizabeth Jean [child]
MORRISSEY Ellen Margaret
MORRISSEY Mary (see MORRISSY)
MORRISSY Mary
MORROW Kathleen Dawn [child]
MORROW Lillian Holland
MORSCHEL Brian John [child]
MORTON Alice Emily
MORTON Clara Ruby [child]
MOSS Ellen
MOSS Louisa
MOSS Margaret
MOULDER Jennie
MOUNTFORD Stella
MOYLAN Margaret
MOYLE Susan Jane
MUCK Jane
MUGGRIDGE Emily
MUIR Caroline
MUIR Lilian
MULCAHY Alice
MULCAHY Alice
MULDER Louisa
MULDOON Jane
MULGREW Annie
MULHARE Norah
MULHERON Beatrice May
MULHOLLAND Nellie
MULLEN .. (daughter of Mrs Emily MULLEN)
MULLER Fanny
MULLER Mina Rachel
MULLINS Annie
MULLINS Louisa V E
MUMFORD Eliza Crilly
MUNCHOW .. (daughter of Robert Gustav MUNCHOW)
MUNDT Minnie
MUNDT Valma [child]
MUNRO Christina
MUNRO Elizabeth
MUNRO Lizzie
MUNSON Ellen Bridget Florence
MURCHIE Jean
MURDOCH Susan Rosahena
MURPHY Annie
MURPHY Annie
MURPHY Bridget
MURPHY E M A
MURPHY Ettie
MURPHY Florence
MURPHY Frances Mary
MURPHY Kate
MURPHY Margaret
MURPHY Mary
MURPHY Mona Annie
MURPHY Rose
MURPHY Sarah
MURRAY Catherine
MURRAY Ellen Agnes
MURRAY Ethel
MURRAY Mary Agnes
MURRAY Mary Ellen
MURTAGH Kate
MURTAGH Kate
MURTAGH Kate
MUSGROVE Frederica
MYERS Eric Stanley [child]
MYERS Lena
MYERS Margaret [child]
How to get copies

NAUMANN Estelle Audrie ?
NAY Kenneth William [child]
NEAL Ada O
NEARY Frances Margaret
NEDDRIE Jean
NEEDHAM Martha Alice
NEEMAN Lilian
NEILL Elsie Rebecca
NEILSEN Christina
NEILSON Annie Stuart
NEILSON Christina (see NEILSEN)
NEILSON Cissy Jane
NEILSON Sissie Jane
NELSON Dorothy May
NELSON Marion C
NELSON Myrtle Grace
NELSON Rosina
NETHERSOLE Dora
NETHERSOLE Mary Louisa
NEVILLE Edna
NEW Jane
NEW Mary Elizabeth
NEWMAN Mary [child]
NEWMAN Minnie Wilhelmina
NEWSON C
NEWSON Eric William [child]
NEWSON Phyllis
NEWTON Edith Maud
NEWTON Eliza Jane
NEYLON Nellie
NICHOL Jane
NICHOLAS Elizabeth
NICHOLLS Elizabeth
NICHOLLS Mary
NICHOLSON Alice Muriel
NICHOLSON Marie Louise [child]
NICKELSON Mary Ellen
NIELSEN Christina Marjorie
Nina (Aboriginal)
NISSEN Catherine
NIX Marian Vera
NIXEY Margaret Rose
NIXON Ada
NIXON Ada Louise
NIXON Claude Frederick [child]
NIXON Neta
NIXON Thelma Evelyn [child]
NOBES Ruth
NOBLE Bella
NOBLE John J [child]
NOBLE Susan
NOEL Madge
NOLAN Alma Mary [child]
NOLAN Annie
NOLAN Johanna
NOLAN Margaret Josephine
NOLAND Frances Hilda
NOON Jane Eliza
NORMAN May
NORTON Rose
NOTHDURFT Ethel Amelia
NUFONG Lavinia ?
NUGENT Jane
NUNN Lilian
How to get copies

OAKES Ethel Alice
OAKLEY Lily
OBRIEN Bridget
OBRIEN Ellen
OBRIEN Emily Theresa
OBRIEN Jane
OBRIEN Kathleen
OBRIEN Margaret Mary
OBRIEN Mary
OBRIEN Mary
OBRIEN Mary Ellen
OCONNELL Ellen
OCONNELL Mary
OCONNOR Catherine
OCONNOR Elizabeth
OCONNOR Kate
OCONNOR Mary
OCONNOR Theresa
ODEA Jennie
ODEA Veronica Abdy
ODONNELL Bridget
ODONNELL Catherine
ODONNELL Cyril George [child]
ODONNELL Eileen Enorah
ODONNELL Kathleen
ODONNELL Madeline [child]
ODONNELL Mary
ODONNELL Norah
ODONOHUE Kate
OKANE Annie
OKEEFE Elizabeth Margaret
OKEEFE Margaret
OKEEFE Mary
OKEEFE Teresa Patricia
OKEEFFE Mary (see OKEEFE)
OLDMAN Edith
OLERHEAD Agnes Henrietta
OLERHEAD Edith Maud
OLIVER Annie
OLIVER Fanny
OLIVER Mary
OLIVER Mary Jane
OLLEY Ada Jane
OLOGHLEN Dorothy
OLOUGHLIN Gloria [child]
OLSEN Anna
OLSEN Florence
OMANT Louisa
ONEILL Fannie Francis
ONEILL Kathleen
ONEILL Margaret Josephine
ONEILL Sylvia Josephine
ONEMAN E (Miss)
ORANGE Mary
OREILLY Christina
OREILLY Mary
OREILLY Mary Ann
ORILEY Rose
ORTON Louisa
OSBORNE Sarah Jane
OSHAUGHNESSY Eva
OSHEA Catherine
OSMOND Matilda
OSMUND Martha M A
OSULLIVAN Dorothy
OSULLIVAN Margaret Mary
OSWIN Florence
OTAGO Dorothy
OTT Mabel R [child]
OUTRAM Emma
OVERS Edith May
OWEN Hilda Mary
OWEN Ruby
OWENS I M A ?
OWENS Margaret Maud
OWENS Maud Margaret (see Margaret Maud)
OWENS N W (Miss)
OWN Maria
OXLEY Catherine
How to get copies

PADGHAM Zoe
PAGE Hannah H
PAGEL Isabelle
PAICE Marion
PAINTER Daisy
PAINTER Mary
PALMER Alice Mary [child]
PANG Rose
PAPACHANZIE Louisa E
PARFETT Sophy
PARFITT Ellen
PARFITT Merle
PARISH Rose
PARK Hannah
PARKER Ada
PARKER Annie
PARKER Billie Desmond [child]
PARKER Frances Emily
PARKER Sarah Jane
PARKES Grace
PARKINS Lily
PARKINSON Annie
PARRETT Ellen C
PARRMAN Margaret
PARSONS Emily
PARSONS Margaret Marion
PARTRIDGE Charlotte Maria
PARTRIDGE Evelyn May
PARTRIDGE Lucy
PASCO Emily
PASCOE Edith Elizabeth
PASCOE Rose
PASCOE Rose
PATA Mary
PATERSON Agnes Eileen
PATRICK Alice
PATRICK Lavinia
PATTERSON Elizabeth
PATTERSON Gertrude
PATTERSON Grace
PATTERSON Lily Elizabeth
PATTERSON Mary
PATTERSON Susan
PATTISON Ada
PATTISON Susan Bridget Katherine
PAULL Jane
PAULL Lavinia
PAULY Josephine Caroline
PAVIS Clara Ann
PAYNE .. (daughter of Mrs Ernestine PAYNE)
PAYNE Clara
PAYNE Edward [child]
PAYNE Emma Ellen
PAYNE Evelyn Daisy
PAYNE Florence
PAYNE Florence Emily
PAYNE Henrietta Emma
PAYNE Margaret
PAYNE Nellie
PEACE Florence
PEACH Maisie Ada
PEACOCK Elizabeth
PEACOCK Sarah Jane
PEACOCK Sarah Jane
PEARCE Charlotte P A
PEARCE Kathleen May
PEARSON Charlotte A
PEARSON Laura Lavinia
PEEBLES Isabella
PEERS Eliza
PEET Jane
PEGG Emma A
PEICK Minnie
PEITZNER Emma L
PEKIN Jane
PELISSIER Elsie
PENDERGAST Theresa Blanch
PENKER Elizabeth Jane
PENNELL Elizabeth Ann
PERDON Rebecca
PERINA Isabella Ruth
PERKINS .. (died c.1920 daughter of Mrs Johanna Warnock PERKINS)
PERKINS Annie
PERKINS Ellen Catherine
PERKS Sarah Emma
PERMONIE Kate
PERRIN Antonette
PERRIN C (Mrs)
PERRY Alice Caroline
PERRY Catherine Isabella
PERRY Daniel Robert [child]
PERRY Rosana
PERRY Ruby
PERRY Susanna
PERSHOUSE Selina Rose
PESCINI Annie
PETERS Ethel
PETERS Ethel Revine
PETERS Mary Jane
PETERSEN Amelia
PETERSEN Maria Martha
PETERSEN Martha Maria
PETERSEN Martha Matilda
PETERSON Maria Martha (see Maria Martha PETERSEN)
PETERSON Minnie
PETTIFER Vena Jane
PETTINGER Annie
PFAN Mary
PFINGST Annie
PHILIPS Eunice May (or PHILLIPS)
PHILLIPS Bessie
PHILLIPS Elizabeth Jane
PHILLIPS Emily May
PHILLIPS Eunice May
PHILLIPS Jean
PHILLIPS Lucy
PHILLIPS May
PHILLIPS Veronica Jean [child]
PHILPOT Harriet
PHILPOTT Mary Jane
PICKELS Mary Ann (see PICKLES)
PICKERING Ivy
PICKERING Stella
PICKFORD Elizabeth
PICKLES Mary Ann
PIERCE Elizabeth
PIGGOTT Emily
PINSACH Francisca
PIPER Jane Isabella
PITT Elizabeth
PITT Isabella
PITTS Emily
PLANCKE Barbara
PLANT Edna Sybil
PLANT Minnie
PLATT Joan
PLEDGER Rachel
PLUMB Louisa
PLUNKETT Lilian May
PLUNKETT Lillian May (see PLUNKETT Lilian May)
POIDEVIN Evelyn
POLLINELLI Elizabeth Ann
POLLOCK Sarah
POLMEER Isabelle
POMFRET Edith
POMFRIT Edith (see POMFRET)
POOLE Annie
POPE Charlotte Ann
POPE Lily
PORTEOUS Ruby Lilian
PORTER Elsie May
PORTER Ivy J
PORTER Jane
PORTER Noeline Frances
POWELL Ada
POWELL Fanny
POWELL Martha E P
POWELL Matilda
POWELL Pansy May
POWER Mary Ann
POWER Maryanne
PRAETZ Conradine Augusta
PRATT Dorothy Henrietta
PRATT Essie May
PRATT Jane
PRATT Teresa
PREBBLE Miriam
PRENTICE Ruby Caroline
PRESTON Alice
PRESTON Alice
PRESTON Jennie
PREW Emily
PRICE Emma
PRICE Margaret Ellen
PRICE Mary
PRIMMER Annie
PRIMMER Elizabeth (Mrs)
PRINGLE Iris Kate
PRIOR Noeline Frances
PRITCHARD Alice
PRITCHARD Elizabeth
PROBERT Annie
PROBERT Elizabeth
PUDDICOMBE Ann Winsor
PUGH Emily Jane
PUGH Emily Jane
PULLINGER Emily Gertrude
PURCELL Eliza
PURDEY Alice
PYERS Nellie
How to get copies

QUAILL Maud
QUAYLE Mabel
QUIGLEY Margaret
QUIGLEY Thomas S F [child]
QUINLAN Annie
QUINLAN Bridget
QUINLINAN Annie Frances
QUINLIVAN Martha
QUINLIVAN Rebecca Catherine Bourke
QUINN Ann
QUINN Eileen Teresa
QUINN Margaret Ethel
QUINN Martha
How to get copies

RAABE Bertha Ann
RAE Mary
RAFFERTY Margaret
RAGGATT Florence Adelaide
RAHILLY Ada
RAINBIRD Susan
RAINSFORD Lewis Robert [child]
RALFS Laura
RALPH Selina
RAMAGE Mary
RAMSAY Elizabeth
RAN Sophia Agnes
RANCHLE Elizabeth
RANCHLE Wilhelmina
RANDLES Elizabeth
RANIE Katherine
RANSLEY Amelia
RASMUSSEN Leilea Olive Adalia
RASSMUSSEN James Walter [child]
RATCLIFF Theresa
RAY Millie
REA Catherine
READ .. (daughter of Mrs E READ)
READ Dorothy Doris
READ Dorothy Doris [child]
REAL Joan Cecilia
REAMANOUS Hannah Maud
REANEY Myrtle
REDDICK Ethel
REDFERN Emma Lydia
REDFERN Ilma Georgine
REDMAN Charlotte
REDMOND Margaret Ann
REDSELL Ernestine
REED Alice
REED Sophie Adelaide
REEDY Jane Ann
REES Bessie
REEVE Sarah
REEVES James William [child]
REEVES Lucretia
REGAN Mary Ann
REICK Dorothea
REID Beverley Jane
REID Julie Ann [child]
REID Lily
REID Margaret
REID Mary Jane
REIDY Annie
REILLY Maria
REIMERS Ada Elizabeth
REIMERS Phyllis
REIS Maud
RELF Elizabeth
REMANOUS Hannah Maud (see REAMANOUS)
RENDALL Ivy
RENFREY Olive May [child]
RENNIE Ann Hayes
RESPINI Amelia
REYNOLDS Annie
RHODE Susannah
RHODES Eliza Violet
RHODES Harriet
RHODES Harriet
RHODES Harriet
RHOOK Margaret Edith
RIBBONS Emma
RICE Fanny
RICH Maud
RICHARDS .. (Mrs of Mount Morgan)
RICHARDS Annie
RICHARDS Elizabeth Jane
RICHARDS Jessie
RICHARDS Margaret
RICHARDS Rhoda
RICHARDS Sarah
RICHARDSON Dorothy
RICHMAN Ivy ?
RICHMOND Emma Louisa
RICHMOND Jane
RICKARD Emma
RICKETTS Jane
RIDDLE Margaret Amelia
RIDGEWELL Jessy
RIDGWAY Annie May
RIDGWAY Myrtle Amy ? (see Myrtle Amy GARDINER)
RIDLEY Helen
RIDLEY Jessie
RIGNEY Annie
RILEY Alice (? child or mother)
RILEY Catherine
RILEY Edith M
RILEY Elizabeth
RILEY Emily Maude
RILEY Eva Lavina
RILEY Patricia [child]
RINALDI Catherine
RIORDAN Alice
RISSMAN Ada
RITCHER Ivy
RITCHIE Caroline Ann
RITCHIE Jane Hannah
ROBB Harriett Isabel
ROBERTS Dottie (see Lottie ROBERTS)
ROBERTS Edith Gertrude
ROBERTS Elizabeth Cecelia
ROBERTS Ellen
ROBERTS Irene
ROBERTS Iris Mildred
ROBERTS Ivy
ROBERTS James William Gibbards [child]
ROBERTS Jessie
ROBERTS Lance Patrick [child]
ROBERTS Lottie
ROBERTS Lottie
ROBERTS Margaret Elsie
ROBERTS Mary
ROBERTS Myra Constance
ROBERTSON Janet
ROBERTSON Laura
ROBERTSON Lillian
ROBERTSON Matilda M A
ROBERTSON Maud May
ROBERTSON Victoria
ROBINSON Ada Ann
ROBINSON Ann
ROBINSON Jean
ROBINSON Jessie
ROBINSON Mabel
ROBINSON Mary Ann
ROBINSON May
ROBINSON Molly
ROBINSON Victoria Ann Cullen [child]
ROBSON Lucy
RODDA Mary
RODDA Thelma Irene [child]
RODGERS Bevan Edward [child]
RODGERS Catherine
RODGERS Elsie Annie
RODWAY Amelia
ROGERS Florence
ROGERS Jane
ROGERS Louisa
ROGERS Mary Patricia
ROGINSON Emily
ROHE Margaretha
ROMAN Elsie
ROMBO Mary May
ROOKE Ruby May
ROOKE Sarah
ROONEY Maude
ROOTS Esther
ROPER Agnes
ROSCOE Harriet
ROSE Amelia
ROSE Rose Louise
ROSENLUND Gerty Olga [child]
ROSENLUND Grete Jorgine Lauritzen
ROSENLUND Mary Adeline [child]
ROSLER Maggie
ROSS Davidina
ROSS Elsie
ROSS Jessie
ROSSER Mona Helen
ROSSNAR Melinda May [child]
ROSSNER Margaret
ROUCK Minnie
ROUHAN Bridget
ROWAN Elsie
ROWE Amy Maud
ROWE Eva Mary
ROWE Fanny
ROWE Maud
ROWE Sarah
ROWLANDS Helen
RUDDELL Gertrude Caroline
RUDHALL Violet
RUMBLE Charlotte
RUNDELL Frances Reubina
RUSE Mary
RUSH Keziah
RUSHWORTH Clara Sophia
RUSS Ellen
RUSS Mary
RUSSELL Agnes
RUSSELL Annie
RUSSELL Catherine
RUSSELL Ellen Elizabeth
RUSSELL Emily
RUSSELL Evaline Caroline
RUSSELL Margaret
RUSSELL Margaret Drysdale
RUSSELL Mary
RUSSELL Maude Julia
RUSSELL William James [child]
RUTHERFORD Alice
RUTHERFORD Emma Jane
RUTLAND Annie
RYAN Bridget
RYAN Daphne
RYAN Ellen
RYAN Emily
RYAN Fanny
RYAN Florence
RYAN Jane
RYAN Johanna
RYAN Kate Emma
RYAN Lily
RYAN Margaret Martha
RYAN Mary
RYAN Mary
RYAN Mary (in NSW)
RYAN Mary (in QLD)
RYAN May
RYAN Nellie
RYAN Rose
RYSDALE Agnes
How to get copies

SABBO Elizabeth
SABBO Leah
SACKLEY Edith
SACKLEY Katherine Ann
SALLOTTI .. (daughter of Mrs H. SALLOTTI)
SALMOND Alice Martha
SAMPSON Catherine Eliza
SANDERS Sarah
SARGENT Blanche
SAUNDERS Mary Frances
SAURERAIN Eliza
SAWATZKI Mary Bertha
SAWYER Lucy
SAXBY Eleanor ? [child - see Ellen SAXBY]
SAXBY Ellen [child]
SAXBY Sarah
SCANLAN Catherine
SCHACKLES Williamina Harriett
SCHINKEL Iris
SCHIRMER Josephine M K
SCHLECHT Rosa
SCHMIDT Annie
SCHMIDT Helen Mary Ann
SCHMIDT Martha
SCHNEIDER Sophia Eliza
SCHNIDER Augusta Elizabeth
SCHOFIELD Allan Stanley [child]
SCHOFIELD Jane
SCHOFIELD May
SCHOLES Clara
SCHUMAKER Annie
SCOBIE .. (Miss)
SCOGGIN Eliza
SCOTLAND Janet
SCOTT Alice
SCOTT Clancy William [child]
SCOTT Elizabeth
SCOTTON Annie
SCULLY Catherine
SCULLY Emily
SCULLY Eveline Clare
SEAGROVE Annie
SEALEY Alice
SEATER Nellie
SEEGAR Sophia
SEEHARS Annie
SEIB Dorothy
SELLINGS Sybil
SELVIDGE Jean [child]
SERGEANT Helen
SEVERN Elizabeth
SEXTON Fanny
SHALDERS Lily May
SHALLCROSS .. (daughter of Mrs SHALLCROSS of Kilcoy)
SHANNON Anne
SHANNON Nora
SHARKEY Jane
SHARKEY Mary Ann [child]
SHARP Emma
SHARP Ida Adelaide
SHARP Mabel
SHARP Mabel Mary
SHARPE Mary
SHATTE Myrtle Amy
SHAW Ernest Leslie Harvey [child]
SHAW Ethel
SHAW Hannah
SHAW Irene
SHAW Irene
SHEARER Ethel Maud
SHEEHAN Ellen
SHEEHAN Grace Mary
SHEEHAN Margaret
SHEGOG Alice
SHEILS Annette
SHELL Ann Jane
SHERGOLD Mary Ann
SHERIDAN Ethel Delia
SHERIDAN Mary E
SHERLIN May
SHICKERLING Esther
SHIELS Annette
SHILLETO Isabella
SHILLITO Christina
SHILLITO Christina
SHIRRESS Annie
SHORT Hannah
SHORT Isabel Florence
SHORTER Ivy
SHULT Mary Theresa [child]
SIDEY Charlotte
SILLKE Augusta
SILVESTER Lucy
SIM Alexandra (see SIMS)
SIM Isabella
SIM Jane
SIM Jane
SIMMONDS Eliza
SIMMONS Ada Theresa
SIMMONS Adelaide
SIMPKINS Hazel Enid [child]
SIMPKINS Ruth
SIMPKINS Ruth Susan
SIMPLE Myrtle
SIMPLE Raymond Edwin [child]
SIMPSON .. (daughter of Mrs Mary SIMPSON)
SIMPSON Ida
SIMS Alexandra
SINCLAIR Annie
SINFIELD Eliza E
SINNAMON Dorothy
SKAIFE Elizabeth
SKIDMORE Mary
SKILBECK Elsie May
SKILLEN Maggie
SKINNER Elizabeth
SKINNER Ethel May
SLATTER Jessie
SLATTERY Bridget
SLATTERY Ellen
SLATTERY John [child]
SLATTERY Mary [child]
SLEETH Charlotte Anna
SLOCOMBE Eleanor
SLOSS Eliza May
SLOSS Mary Ellen
SMAIL Kate
SMALL Annie L
SMALL Eliza
SMALL Gloria [child]
SMELLIE Janet
SMELTZER Roy Edward [child]
SMELTZER Roy Edward [child]
SMILEY Jane Ethel
SMITH A E
SMITH Alice
SMITH Alice May
SMITH Amelia
SMITH Amy Goodchild
SMITH Ann
SMITH Annie
SMITH Catherine
SMITH Catherine
SMITH Charlotte
SMITH Charlotte Lydia
SMITH Clara
SMITH Daphne
SMITH Dorothy Mavis
SMITH Dorothy May
SMITH Effie [child]
SMITH Eileen
SMITH Eliza
SMITH Eliza (in Victoria)
SMITH Elizabeth
SMITH Elizabeth
SMITH Elizabeth (had an illegitimate female child)
SMITH Elizabeth (mother of illegitimate child born 22 Sep 1909)
SMITH Ella Beatrice [child]
SMITH Ellen
SMITH Elsie
SMITH Ethel Millicent
SMITH Eva
SMITH Gwendoline Joyce
SMITH Hannah Elizabeth
SMITH Harold [child b.c1911]
SMITH Hilda May
SMITH Hilda May
SMITH Isabella
SMITH Isabella Mabel
SMITH Jack [child ? related to Ivy Beatrice SMITH]
SMITH Jane
SMITH Janet
SMITH Joan Ivor [child]
SMITH Julia
SMITH Lilian Grace
SMITH Lilly
SMITH Lily
SMITH Louisa Arabella May
SMITH Mabel B C
SMITH Mabel Blanche Curran
SMITH Margaret
SMITH Margaret
SMITH Margaret Josephine
SMITH Mary
SMITH Mary Ann
SMITH Rita Zilda
SMITH Robert Yatalee [child]
SMITH Rose
SMITH Rose Myrtle
SMITH Sarah Elizabeth
SMITH Sarah J I
SMITH Sydney Emanuel [child]
SMITH William [child]
SMITH Willie [child born 1901]
SMITH Winifred
SMITHERS Lorna Blenda
SMYTH Harriet
SMYTH May
SMYTH May
SNEDDON Lillian
SNELL Sarah
SNOW Alice Maud Eliza
SNOWDON Ethel
SOMERVILLE Elizabeth Jane
SOMERVILLE Lucy Ellen Ruth
SOMMERFELD Lily
SOMMERVILLE .. (Miss see Elizabeth Jane SOMERVILLE)
SONNES Letitia Jane
SOUTHGATE Martha
SPARKES Brian [child]
SPARKSMAN Lucy
SPARROW Lillian Ethel
SPEARING Louisa
SPEARS Jean Edith Irene
SPEARS Raymond [child]
SPENCE Elizabeth
SPENCER Gladys
SPENCER Jessie Eliza
SPICER Olive
SPIES Bertha
SPIKERMAN Jane
SPILLER Rebecca
SPOWART Ruby
SPRING Albert Morton [child]
SQUIRE Eva
STAFFORD Ellen
STAFFORD Ellen
STAFFORD Gladys May
STAFFORD Rose Helen
STALLMAN Ellen Annie
STANLEY Mary Ann
STANLEY Mary Ann
STANLEY Mary Ann [child]
STAPLES Frances
STAPLES Percival [child]
STAPLETON Ruby
STARK Helena Augusta
STARK Lily
STARKEY Margaret Amelia
STEARMAN Augusta
STEBBINS Annie
STEDFUT Mary Jane
STEEL Mabel
STEEL Muriel Irene ?
STEELE Margaret
STEELE Ruby Townson
STEEN Martha Ann
STEEN Violet
STEGEMANN Edna Victoria
STEGMANN Edna Victoria (see STEGEMANN)
STEIN Noeline
STEPHAN Florence Catherine
STEPHAN Kathleen [child]
STEPHEN Annie
STEPHENS Annie
STEPHENS Catherine Josephine
STEPHENS Dorothea
STEPHENS Janet
STEPHENSON Ellen
STEPHENSON Grace
STEVE Ethel Louisa
STEVENS Annie
STEVENS Clara
STEVENS Eliza
STEVENS Elizabeth (her child Kate was born in Exeter)
STEVENS Ellen
STEVENS Kate [child b.1865 Exeter]
STEVENS Mary Ann
STEVENS Olive Magdeline May
STEVENS Roderick John [child]
STEVENSON Catherine
STEVENSON John William [child]
STEWART Barbara
STEWART Eliza Jane
STEWART Elizabeth Jane
STEWART Frances
STEWART Johanna
STEWART Julia Christina [child]
STEWART Sarah Ann
STIGLICH Margaret
STIRLING Esther Ellis
STOCKILL Alice Maud Mary
STOCKWELL Beulah
STODDART Annie
STOKES Ellen Jane
STORER Mabel Ruth
STOW Alice
STOWBRIDGE Eliza
STRACEY Amy Isobel
STRANDGARD Agnes
STRATHIE Julia Lena
STRATTEN Rachel
STREETER Elizabeth
STRICHMANN Wilhelmina
STRINGHAM Sarah
STRUGNELL Jane
STUCKERLING Esther
STUDD Jane Margaret
STUDD Sarah (Mrs)
STUMER Emilia
STURGESS Annie Maud
SUE SANG Theresa
SUEY Alice Maud
SULLIVAN Harriet
SULLIVAN Julia
SULLIVAN Margaret
SULLIVAN Violet Mary
SUMPTON Mary Jane
SURAWSKI Margaret
SURAWSKI Vincent [child]
SURCH Annie
SURKITT Elizabeth
SUTHERLAND Eric James [child]
SUTHERLAND Lilian
SUTHERLAND Louisa
SUTHERLAND Louisa
SUTTON Julia Agnes
SWEE SANG Theresa (see SUE SANG)
SWEENEY Daisy
SWEENEY Maud
SWEEPER Myrtle
SWITZKY Edith (Mrs)
SYKES Clara
SYME Eva Jane
SYMONS Mary Grace
How to get copies

TABKE Elizabeth
TAGUE Jane
TAIT Catherine
TANNA Grace
TANSEY Anastasia
TANSEY Annie
TAPP Mary Ann
TAYLOR Ada
TAYLOR Alfred [child]
TAYLOR Alice Eliza
TAYLOR Annie Elizabeth
TAYLOR Annie Elizabeth
TAYLOR Coral
TAYLOR Dorothy
TAYLOR Dorothy Grace
TAYLOR Elizabeth
TAYLOR Fay Ellen
TAYLOR Kate
TAYLOR Lilly
TAYLOR Lily
TAYLOR Margaret Jackson
TAYLOR Mary
TAYLOR Mary Esther
TAYLOR Mary Jane
TAYLOR Maude
TAYLOR May
TAYLOR May
TEGG Gladys
TEMPLETON Hilda
TESSMAN Mary
TEVLEN Agnes
THAKE Charlotte Ann
THEOBOLD Laura
THOMAS Annie Beatrice
THOMAS Elizabeth
THOMAS Ellen
THOMAS Florence
THOMAS Lily
THOMAS Mary Anne Eliza
THOMAS Olive Grace
THOMAS Rosina
THOMPSON Ada
THOMPSON Alexandra
THOMPSON Alice
THOMPSON Anne Jane (widow)
THOMPSON Clarice
THOMPSON Elizabeth
THOMPSON Emily
THOMPSON Emily
THOMPSON Jane
THOMPSON Jessie
THOMPSON Mary
THOMPSON Mary Jane
THOMPSON Sarah
THOMPSON Sarah
THOMSETT Kathleen Mary
THOMSON Elsie Clara
THORBURN Agnes
THORNTON Gladys Irene
THURGOOD Margaret
TIGHE Amy
TILLEY Elizabeth
TILLEY Ethel
TILNEY Martha Annie
TIMMS Maud
TINDELL Emily
TISHBOURNE Myrtle
TOCCHINI Margaret
TODD Christina Frances [child]
TODD Elizabeth
TODD Hanna
TODD Mabel
TODD Marion
TOLL Margaret
TOMLINSON Leslie William [child]
TOMS Alice E [child]
TOMS Keith [child]
TONKS Clara
TOOHEY Ellen
TOOHEY Ellen [child?]
TOOHEY Ellen [child]
TOOHILL Agnes
TOOLEY Minnie
TOOMEY Ethel
TOWERS Elizabeth
TOWN Mabel
TOWNSEND Emma Jane
TOWNSEND Mary Grace
TRANTER Elizabeth Ann
TREACY Minnie
TREBBE Mary Jane
TREBBLE Norah
TRELOAR Agnes
TREMEWIN Selina
TREVES Florence May [child]
TREWEEK Irene
TRIESHMAN Sophia
TRIMBLE Louisa
TRIMBLE Rebecca Louisa
TRINDER Alice
TROEDSON Jacqueline [child]
TROEDSON Molly Mary
TRONC Dorothea
TROTTER Ethel May
TROTTER Kate
TROTTER Rosella
TRUDGEON Daisy
TRUESDELL Elizabeth
TUCKER Ethel Maud
TUCKER Mabel Violet Annie
TUCKER Mary
TULLY Eliza
TURLAND Ellen
TURNBULL Christina
TURNBULL Malenda
TURNBULL W (Mrs of Brisbane)
TURNER Agnes
TURNER Ann
TURNER Elizabeth
TURNER Elizabeth Johanna
TURNER Ivy
TURNER Lily May
TURNER Margaret
TURNER Mary Elizabeth
TURNER Matilda Jane
TURNER Nellie
TURNSTALL Eliza
TURTON Elizabeth
TUSSLER Annie Eileen
TWEEDIE Alice
TWIDALE .. (daughter of T. TWIDALE)
TWIN Madalene Josephine
TYNAN Phyllis
TYNAN Valerie Joyce [child]
TYRRELL Jane
TYSOE Lillian
How to get copies

UDALL Ethel
UNDERWOOD .. (daughter of Mrs Mary UNDERWOOD)
UNDERWOOD Edith Florence
UNDERWOOD Irene
UNDERWOOD Maud
URQUHART Harriet
USHER .. (daughter of John USHER)
How to get copies

VALLANCE Annie
VANOTTE Ellen
VARKER Carolina
VAUGHAN Anastasia
VAUGHAN Annie
VAUGHAN Margaret
VAUGHAN Mary Josephine
VEARES Annie Elizabeth (see VEARS)
VEARS Annie Elizabeth
VERNALL Nellie Lois
VICKERS Edna Harriet
VINCE Robina (nee HOGARTH)
VINCENT Mary
VINCENT Mary
VINEBERG Annie
VIZE Lucy
VOGEL Bertha Amanda ?
VOGLER Esther
How to get copies

WADDLETON Emily Louisa
WAGHORN Mary Jane
WAGNER Martha
WAINWRIGHT Emma
WAKENSHAW May
WALDEN Agnes Elizabeth
WALDERSEE Bertha
WALDON Lily
WALDRON Emma
WALFORD Lavinia
WALKER Adelaide
WALKER Caroline
WALKER Edith Ellen Sophia
WALKER Elsie
WALKER Ethel
WALKER Ivy Evelyn
WALKER Jean Wallace
WALKER Lizzie
WALKER Lucy
WALKER Margaret
WALKER Margaret Rosalie
WALKER Mary Jane
WALKER May
WALKER May Elizabeth
WALKER Winifred Evelyn
WALL Helena Mary
WALL Kenneth Jack [child]
WALL Mary
WALL Mary (see May WALL)
WALL May (or Mary)
WALLACE Cecil Alexander [child]
WALLACE Eliza
WALLACE Jane
WALLACE Lillian May
WALLACE Lydia
WALLACE Raymond Francis [child]
WALLER Emily
WALLER Sarah
WALLMEYER Annie
WALLWORK Bella
WALSH Alice
WALSH Catherine
WALSH Elizabeth
WALSH Ellen
WALSH Honora
WALSH Margaret
WALSH Margaret
WALSH Mary
WALSH Reiney
WALTER Elsie
WALTER Una
WALTERS Mary
WALTON Violet
WANERSLY Mary Ann
WANLISS Martha
WAPPLES Charlotte
WARBURTON Doris Clarette
WARBURTON Sarah Alice
WARBURTON Walter Ernest [child]
WARBY Edith Florence
WARD Ellen Louisa
WARD Lena Elizabeth
WARD Rose
WARD Rosie
WARDLEY Lillian May
WARE Agnes [child]
WARE Emma ?
WARING Mary Ann
WARNE Charlotte
WARNER Mercy
WARREN Adelaide
WARREN Evie Pauline
WARREN Florence
WARREN Mary Jane
WATERHOUSE Catherine
WATERS Iris [child]
WATERS Lillian May
WATERSTON Mary Ann
WATKINS Ellen
WATKINS Jean
WATKINS May
WATSON Edith Florence
WATSON Ethel Edith
WATSON Ethel May
WATSON Florence
WATSON Florence May
WATSON Sarah E
WATSON Vera Olive
WATT Evelyn Ann
WATT Maud
WATT Olive
WATTS Caroline
WATTS Margaret Ann
WATTS Mary Jane
WEATHERSTON Charlotte Ann
WEAVER Maud
WEBB Daisy
WEBB Elizabeth Delia
WEBB Mary
WEBB Molly
WEBB Ruth
WEBER Gordon Charles Patrick [child]
WEICKHARDT Clara Maud
WEIDON Laura
WEIR Colleen Mary [child]
WEIR Emily
WEIR Isabella
WEISE Sarah H
WEISS Agnes
WELDON Ivy Ann
WELLINGTON Selina
WELLS Doreen Mavis [child]
WELLS Sarah Ann
WELSH Catherine
WELSH Florence
WEMYSS Alice Selina
WENT Mavis Eileen
WERDA Florence May
WERE Agnes (see Agnes V WARE)
WERE Emilie (see Emma WARE)
WEST Gertrude Florence
WEST Isabel
WEST Lillian May
WEST Mary Ann
WESTABY Jane
WESTERBECK Mary
WESTON Henrietta Florence
WESTON Mabel Mildred
WHATELEY Ilena Maud
WHEELER Caroline
WHEELER Edith Annie
WHEELER Isabella
WHELAN Constance J
WHELAN Eliza
WHELAN Gertie May
WHELAN Lilly
WHELAN Norah
WHERRY Jean
WHITE .. (sister of R B WHITE)
WHITE Annie
WHITE Bertha
WHITE Bertha
WHITE Clarice
WHITE Daisy
WHITE Elizabeth
WHITE Emma Ann
WHITE Emma Glenny
WHITE Georgina W
WHITE Jessie
WHITE Lavinia
WHITE Louisa ?
WHITE Mary
WHITE Mary Jane
WHITE Minnie
WHITE Violet Winifred
WHITE Yvonne Mary
WHITEHILL Olive
WHITESIDE Annie
WHITESIDE Mary Ann
WHITESTYLES Eliza
WHITFIELD James Leslie [child]
WHITNEY Catherine
WHITNEY Janet Olivia
WHITTAKER Emily
WHITTINGHAM Mary
WHITTINGTEN Irene
WICKHAM Dora Beatrice
WIDDON Thirza Elizabeth
WILKIE Winifred
WILKINS Albina
WILKINSON Ellen
WILKINSON Martha
WILLETT Catherine
WILLIAMS Alice Mary
WILLIAMS Annie
WILLIAMS Annie
WILLIAMS Christina
WILLIAMS Doris
WILLIAMS Elizabeth
WILLIAMS Elizabeth
WILLIAMS Elizabeth
WILLIAMS Emily
WILLIAMS Emma
WILLIAMS Ethel
WILLIAMS Eulalie Henrietta
WILLIAMS Georgina
WILLIAMS Gwinnie Jane
WILLIAMS Hannah
WILLIAMS Jane
WILLIAMS Lilley
WILLIAMS Margaret
WILLIAMS Maria
WILLIAMS Phyllis
WILLIAMS Rose Evelyn
WILLIAMS Sophia
WILLIAMS Violet (Miss)
WILLIAMSON .. (Miss)
WILLIAMSON Emma
WILLIAMSON Myra
WILLIAMSON Nellie
WILLIAMSON Sarah
WILLICK Minnie
WILLIS Catherine
WILLIS Ivy
WILLIS Marion
WILLIS Mary Ann
WILLISON Mercia Beryl
WILMORE Mabel
WILMOTT Clara
WILSON Annie
WILSON Elizabeth
WILSON Elizabeth
WILSON Elizabeth
WILSON Elizabeth M
WILSON Frances Elizabeth
WILSON Grace
WILSON Jemima
WILSON Maggie (year 1888)
WILSON Maggie (year 1890)
WILSON Margaret
WILSON Margaret
WILSON Margaret Jean [child]
WILSON Mary
WILSON Mary Ann
WILSON Mary Jane
WILSON Mary R
WILSON Maud
WILSON Michael Joseph [child]
WILSON Nellie Muriel (see HEMMING)
WILSON Ruth
WILSON Sarah
WILSON Sarah Ann
WINCH Lydia
WINDOVER Annie
WINDOW Edith
WINTER Emily Violet
WINTZLOFF Emily Jane
WISE Agnes
WISE Harriet Emma Ellen
WISHART Hilda
WITHERS Marline Mary [child]
WITTER Annie
WOOD Emily Edith Maud
WOOD Evelyn M [child]
WOODGATE Maggie
WOODGETT Sarah
WOODHOUSE Isabella May
WOODLAND Frederica May
WOODLAND Ruby
WOODS Arthur [child]
WOODS Jean Adelaide
WOODS John [child]
WOODS Mary
WOODS Sybil Lacy
WOODWARD Doris May
WOODWARD Ernest [child]
WOODWARD Eva
WOODWARD Louie
WOOLF Mabel
WOOLL Elsie May
WOOLLEY Bernise Isabel
WOOTTEN Louisa
WRIGHT Charlotte Jane
WRIGHT Ellen
WRIGHT Emma
WRIGHT Emma Rosina
WRIGHT Ethel May
WRIGHT Georgina
WRITER Catherine Mary
WUST .. (daughter of Walter WUST)
WYETH Alice Maud
WYLES Mary
WYLLIE Ellen
WYSE Sarah
How to get copies

YARHAM .. (daughter of Harriet YARHAM)
YARROW Agnes
YEARK Gladys [child]
YEARK Mavis [child]
YEARK Richard [child]
YEARK William [child]
YEATES Irene Pearl [child]
YORKE Stella
YOUNG Agnes
YOUNG Amy Mary Hopkins
YOUNG Katie
YOUNG Lily Louisa
YOUNG Maud
YOUNG Ruby
YOUNG Sarah Ann
YOUNG Susan Violet
YOURALL Rose
YOUWELL Sarah Jane
How to get copies

ZARHAM .. (daughter of Harriet ZARHAM)
ZEINERT Bertha
ZEITH Emma
ZESSIN Ottilie
ZEUSCHNER Adolfina W H
ZIMMERMAN Emily
ZUCH Rosie
How to get copies

Check the list above to see whether it includes the name of the child (marked [child]) or (more likely) the child's mother. If it does not, see 'Other suggestions'.

The copying service is ONLY for names ON THIS PAGE. For other names, see 'Other suggestions'. Read the instructions below very carefully!

Genealogy is my business (not just a hobby), and I've spent over 35 years learning about (and indexing) original records, so I charge fees for my time, regardless of the result. It takes time to consult my index, travel to a record office in Brisbane, find the relevant bundle/volume and file/page, and inspect the document. These options and prices are available for a trial period but are subject to change.

Option No.1: Illegitimate INDEX: Record series & Quote.
Cost: $5 for one entry, plus $2 for each additional entry (same name or different names, up to a maximum of 8 entries).

  1. Calculate the cost ($5 for one entry, plus $2 each for extras).
  2. Send payment by bank deposit or PayPal as explained here (opens in a new window).
  3. In an email, type 'Illegitimate INDEX: Record series and Quote', and.
  4. List the entries you want (ONLY names shown on THIS PAGE) (8 maximum). Don't send any other details - just the names.
  5. In your email, tell me the date, amount and method of your payment.
  6. Send the email to the address shown on this page (opens in a new window).
  • I will say, 'The birth would have been no later than..' (my email will tell you what year).
  • Brief description of the record series and its contents
  • Name of repository that holds the record
  • No-obligation quote for a digital copy of the original record.
  1. Calculate the cost ($8 for one entry, plus $2 each for extras).
  2. Send payment by bank deposit or PayPal as explained here (opens in a new window).
  3. In an email, type 'Illegitimate Index: Record series, Quote & Mini-guide', and.
  4. List the entries you want (ONLY names shown on THIS PAGE) (8 maximum). Don't send any other details - just the names.
  5. Send the email to the address shown on this page (opens in a new window).
  • I will say, 'The birth would have been no later than..' (my email will tell you what year).
  • Brief description of the record series and its contents
  • Name of repository that holds the record
  • No-obligation quote for a digital copy of the original record
  • 4-page mini-guide Researching Illegitimate Children (PDF) with advice on research strategies, and a long list of sources that may name the putative father.

See my mini-guide 'Researching Illegitimate Children' for advice on research strategies, and a long list of sources that may name the child's father.

No index is perfect, so the more indexes you use, the more likely you are to find 'missing' entries. An earlier version of Queensland birth indexes up to and including 1919 is on Findmypast (link opens a search page in a new window).

Check the Interim Index. Some mothers of illegitimate children may still be listed there instead of here (I won't bore you with the reasons!)

Check the list of Neglected Children, and (these open in new windows) the Sydney Benevolent Asylum Index 1857-1900 (includes unmarried mothers from NSW, Qld etc) and Helen Harris's indexes (Infant Life Protection Act Missing people Wife/child deserters).

Use DNA tests for genealogy (that page lists the tests I recommend, suggested reading, etc).

When more names are added to this page, I'll announce it in my email newsletter and on What's New.

Search this site (do NOT use apostrophes read search results page carefully)

This site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Australia License. I hold copyright in the contents of the site, which may be used for personal research only. If you reproduce any content in any way, you must acknowledge that it belongs to me. If you wish to use any part of this site for professional or commercial purposes, you must contact me in advance to obtain my permission.


Andre Briscoe Indicted For Allegedly Fatally Shooting Woman, 7-Year-Old Child During 2015 Armed Robbery

BALTIMORE (WJZ) — An alleged Maryland drug dealer has been indicted at the federal level on a number of charges after officials said he shot and killed a woman and her seven-year-old child during a 2015 armed robbery.

Andre Ricardo Briscoe, 37, was indicted on Wednesday on charges of drug distribution, use of a firearm to commit murder in relation to drug trafficking crimes and killing a witness to prevent communication with law enforcement, the justice department said.

According to the indictment, Briscoe was part of a conspiracy to distribute heroin between March and October 2015. On May 27 of that year, in connection with the drug distribution, he allegedly committed an armed robbery, during which he fatally shot 37-year-old Jennifer Jeffrey and her seven-year-old child.

The child was shot multiple times, including in the head and the mouth, the indictment said.

If found guilty of the murders, Briscoe could spend life in prison or be sentenced to death, the justice department said. He is in custody on a previous indictment.


Paul Briscoe

Born: (1930-07-12)July 12, 1930Streatham, London, England, UK
Occupation: School teacher and writer

TAG VS Integrates Support for Hawk-Eye Into IP-Based MCM-900 Multiviewer

Sports Video Group - Wed, 24 Mar 2021

TAG Video Systems Appoints Paul Briscoe as Chief Architect

Sports Video Group - Tue, 18 Feb 2020

EXCLUSIVE: NYPD sergeant abruptly transferred out of mayor's security detail following discrimination scandal files for retirement

New York Daily News - Wed, 22 Aug 2018

Testimony from ex-de Blasio security member reveals cops on edge around him

New York Post - Sun, 23 Feb 2020

SMPTE Board of Governors Begin 2021-22 Term

Sports Video Group - Wed, 06 Jan 2021

Drynks expands alcohol-free portfolio after Dragons' Den investment

The Drinks Business - Mon, 01 Jun 2020

Paul Briscoe

Telegraph.co.uk - Fri, 20 Aug 2010

A pioneering drinks entrepreneur is set to showcase his range of alcohol-free drinks on national TV

'Round two' for Otley's online music festival

Wharfedale Observer - Tue, 14 Jul 2020

Black NYPD detective on Mayor de Blasio's security detail files $10 million discrimination suit

New York Daily News - Thu, 06 Sep 2018

Alcohol-free drinks business awarded investment by Dragons' Den

Rochdale Online - Mon, 09 Mar 2020

Mayor de Blasio’s staff lost NYPD bulletproof vest worn by Omar from ‘The Wire’ in charity performance

New York Daily News - Wed, 24 Jul 2019

The Fathering Project to host Virtual Tour for Armidale dads to stay connected

Armidale Express - Mon, 27 Jul 2020

Alcohol-free drinks brand Smashed secures £125k investment on Dragons' Den

The Drinks Report - Wed, 11 Mar 2020

Readers' choice: The best place to get a warming soup and roll in Workington area

Times & Star - Fri, 18 Sep 2020

Upheaval continues in mayor's security detail second-in-command transferred out

New York Daily News - Thu, 06 Sep 2018

Time of death needs to be called on Criminal Minds

Stuff.co.nz - Sat, 05 Sep 2020

Retired NYPD sergeant says former supervisor in Mayor de Blasio’s security detail drunkenly assaulted him during fight at Gracie Mansion

New York Daily News - Mon, 27 Aug 2018

Dragons' Den: no and low entrepreneur gets £125000 backing

MorningAdvertiser.co.uk - Tue, 10 Mar 2020

Milestone for Otley micro-brewery

Wharfedale Observer - Tue, 20 Nov 2018

NYPD Internal Affairs examining fight at Gracie Mansion between members of mayor's bodyguard unit

New York Daily News - Mon, 27 Aug 2018

SMPTE ST 2110: Structuring the Future of Broadcasting

IEEE Spectrum - Fri, 01 Jun 2018

Farmers for Cindy Endorses U.S. Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith

Yall Politics - Fri, 15 Jun 2018

How the flower business is changing in Wollongong

Illawarra Mercury - Mon, 11 Jul 2016

Melita & Deloraine collaborate to host provincial curling championships

Virden Empire Advance - Tue, 17 Mar 2020

Thomas Schueck, self-described 'lost soul,' found himself and built a construction empire

Arkansas Online - Sun, 02 Dec 2018

Otley micro-brewer raising a glass to the New Year

Ilkley Gazette - Sat, 04 Jan 2020

Gorvins supports alcohol free drinks business with Dragons Den pitch

Marketing Stockport news feed - Thu, 12 Mar 2020

Looking back: Nov. 14, 2014

Shelbyville Sentinel News - Fri, 14 Nov 2014

Why Thomas Chippendale is part of the furniture in Otley

Yorkshire Post - Thu, 15 Feb 2018

Obituaries 1-20-2016 | Obituaries

Appalachian News-Express - Wed, 20 Jan 2016


The Disposable Skateboard Bible Online PDF eBook

DOWNLOAD The Disposable Skateboard Bible PDF Online. Hardcover amazon.com [Sean Cliver, Simpson Eric] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. With the release of Disposable A History of Skateboard Art in 2004, author Sean Cliver made a brilliant attempt at artfully cataloging every important skateboard deck ever released. In the process TheDisposableSkateboardBiblepdfrar unravorke.wixsite.com e31cf57bcd The.Disposable.Skateboard.Bible.pdf.rar advanced find and replace 7.8.1 cracked delhi university llb entrance preparation books kamasutra book pdf in kannada free .Powered by RebelMouse. EXPLORE.Kuljetustarjoukset.837801.n3.nabble.com at KeyOptimize. TheDisposableSkateboardBiblepdfrar unravorke.wixsite.com The.Disposable.Skateboard.Bible.pdf.rar DOWNLOAD (Mirror #1) e31cf57bcd The.Disposable.Skateboard.Bible.pdf.rar advanced find and replace 7.8.1 cracked delhi university llb entrance preparation books kamasutra book pdf in kannada free .Powered by RebelMouse. pdf download « Patrick s info Sean Cliver. . at awsm.com. A couple months back I picked up a copy of from Sean Cliver. A few years ago I picked up the softcover version of Disposable A History of Skateboard Art from the PSC in central Melbourne . Read Disposable Skateboard Bible PDF Online Do you like to read books online? Read the Disposable Skateboard Bible ebook online. With our site luxuryinburgundy.com it is simple. Register and download books for free. Big choice! Disposable A History of Skateboard Art Sean Cliver . Disposable A History of Skateboard Art [Sean Cliver] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Longtime skateboard artist Sean Cliver put together this staggering survey of over 1, 000 skateboard graphics from the last 30 years [PDF Download] [Download . [PDF Download] [Download] Full Ebook. Report. Browse more videos. Playing next. 025. Download Books PDF Free. Juliaguilar45. 022. PDF Download PDF Full Ebook. Sosteasi. 007 Sports Book Review by . [PDF Download] [Download] Full Ebook. Ingrid. 022. PDF Download PDF Full Ebook. Sosteasi. 946 “Me di cuenta de la veracidad de los audios” mayor general (r) Clíver Alcalá sobre grabaciones para ubicar francotirado. | Pdf Gratuit DESCRIPTION Téléchargement de livres médicaux gratuitement. Sean Cliver With the release of Disposable A History of Skateboard Art in 2004 author Sean Cliver made a brilliant attempt at artfully cataloging every important skateboard Disposable A History of Skateboard Art skate graphics Disposable A History of Skateboard Art skate graphics book by Sean Cliver [PDF Download] Disposable A History of Skateboard Art . [PDF Download] [Download] Full Ebook. Ingrid. 007 [PDF Download] [PDF] Online. Simooo2 2012. 025. Download Books PDF Free. Juliaguilar45. 432. ReVive Skateboards Deck Grip Tape Art, Setup and Skateboarding. Download Disposable A History of Skateboard Art PDF This video is unavailable. Watch Queue Queue. Watch Queue Queue 10th Anniversary Edition . 10th Anniversary Edition [Sean Cliver, Eric Simpson] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Celebrate the 10th anniversary of the greatest skateboard deck compilation with this special print edition of . With the release of Disposable A History of Skateboard Art in 2004 i PDF Download PDF Full . PDF Download PDF Full Ebook. Report. Browse more videos. Playing next. 025. Download Books PDF Free. Juliaguilar45. 007 [PDF Download] [PDF] Online. Simooo2 2012. 030 Disposable Skateboard Bible Gingko Press Download Free . Disposable Skateboard Bible by Gingko Press, 9781584233275, download free ebooks, Download free PDF EPUB ebook..

Disposable Skateboard Bible Gingko Press Download Free . Download Disposable Skateboard Bible – Gingko Press ebook With the release of Disposable – A History of Skateboard Art in 2004, author Sean Cliver made a brilliant attempt at artfully cataloging every important skateboard deck ever released. Download Free.


Bright light, big city

INTERVIEW:Pete Hamill – newspaperman, novelist, essayist, critic, editor, screenwriter, Grammy award-winner – can now add crime writer to his curriculum vitae, writes GEORGE KIMBALL, long-time friend of the legendary New Yorker

THE SENSATIONAL CRIME that serves as the tent-pole for the plot of Pete Hamill’s new novel Tabloid Cityis one Hamill has described as “a tabloid editor’s wet dream” – a grisly double-murder at a “good” address following a high-society soiree attended by several of New York’s more prominent citizens.

Although the crime occurs in the wee hours of the morning, after the next day’s New York World has been put to bed, its editor, Sam Briscoe, issues an order to stop the presses and augment the final edition with a wraparound front page headlined “THE LAST DINNER PARTY”.

Pete Hamill has so frequently been described as “the quintessential New York newspaperman” that an entire generation probably thinks Q is his middle initial. (The critic Eric Alterman, further struggling for definition, once called him “tabloid journalism’s original renaissance man”.)

Journalist, novelist, essayist, critic, screenwriter and educator, Hamill even has a Grammy on his trophy shelf, for his liner notes to Bob Dylan’s Blood on the Tracks. A few months ago, New York University, where he has served for half a dozen years as distinguished writer-in-residence, apparently decided that a man who wore so many hats could use a second chair, and added the Jacob K Javits visiting professorship to his portfolio.

The one-time bon vivant, who once squired the likes of Shirley MacLaine, Linda Ronstadt, and Jacqueline Onassis about town, has long settled into a life of personal domesticity – he has been married to Japanese journalist Fukiko Aoki for nearly a quarter of a century. Along the way, he has assumed, rather seamlessly, the role of éminence gris in the New York literary firmament.

Indeed, Hamill’s 20 books include 11 novels, three collections of his journalism, two books of short stories, a biography of the Mexican painter Diego Rivera, and his acclaimed memoir A Drinking Life,but since the dawn of the present millennium he has focused his attention on the motif he knows best – the Big Apple.

In Downtown: My Manhattan, a 2004 book that was part travelogue and part memoir, the Brooklyn-born Hamill explored the tapestry of the island he has called home for half a century, while his novels Forever (2003)and North River(2007) relied on his extensive accumulation of knowledge of both New York history and the immigrant experience.

Tabloid Citymay be the most ambitious of all, taking place in a frenetic 24-hour period in 2009, as seen through the eyes of a disparate cast of characters as they hurtle toward an apocalyptic convergence.

The seemingly scattershot pastiche of points of view was intentional, says Hamill. “I wanted the book to reflect the lean, quick-hit style of a tabloid, where less is often more. Once I’d finished, I tried to make that effect even more pronounced: I went back and cut another 100 pages out of the manuscript.”

The major character, Briscoe, is the 71-year-old editor of the New York World, a hard-bitten, old-school newspaperman who has spent a lifetime in journalism. Since Hamill, who was 71 in 2009, is former editor-in-chief of New York’s extant tabloids, the Postand the Daily News, many readers and not a few reviewers have leapt to the assumption that Briscoe is a thinly disguised version of the author. While they share many characteristics, says Hamill, he is not Sam Briscoe – and Briscoe is not Pete Hamill.

“Briscoe is half-Jewish, named in homage to the one-time lord mayor of Dublin,” says Hamill. “My parents were Belfast Catholics. His roots are in Manhattan, mine in Brooklyn. He lives alone, while I have lived for almost 25 years with my wife Fukiko. He worked for the Paris Herald-Tribune I never did, although I did drop in to use a typewriter there a few times. But there are other things – Briscoe, for instance, definitely has my bookshelves, arranged like tenements.”

Briscoe also reflects many Hamill sensibilities when he allows, as he often does, his thoughts to wander back through the world of New York newspapers over the latter half of the 20th century, to fallen comrades and bygone saloons.

But those familiar with his CV will recognise that Sam Briscoe isn’t the only Hamill alter ego roaming the streets of Tabloid City.

Lew Forrest, the near-blind artist living out his days at the Chelsea Hotel, the famed bohemian haunt where Hamill once resided, and Beverly Starr, the cutting-edge cartoonist, also share elements of the author’s history as a young man, Hamill aspired to a career as a cartoonist, and later, as a painter.

“It was only after I failed at those that I turned to writing,” he says. “In certain ways those characters helped me live the possible lives I had envisioned for myself when I was 20,” admits Hamill. “When I was in the navy, I wanted to go to Paris and the Académie Julian. I never did. Mexico City took me instead.”

Instead he wound up serving as the art director for a Greek-language paper called Atlantis, which published a monthly magazine of the same name. Hamill talked his way into writing a piece. His maiden effort was a profile of his friend José Torres, then a neophyte middleweight but eventually the world light-heavyweight champion. Hamill eventually attracted enough attention to land himself a job at the pre-Murdoch Post.

“Within a year I was a full-time reporter,” he says. “In 1962 I wrote a series about 42nd Street called Welcome to Lostville. One result was that the young Bob Dylan read it and invited me to his first concert at Town Hall the result was a kind of friendship that years later led to my liner notes for Blood on the Tracks.

“In the summer, when Al Buck went on vacation, I’d fill in as the boxing writer,” says Hamill. “Later in 1962 I went to Chicago to cover the first Patterson-Liston fight. The publicist Harold Conrad had invited a number of literary types, so in the press room you had AJ Liebling and Jimmy Cannon and Budd Schulberg over here, and over there, the likes of Norman Mailer, James Baldwin, George Plimpton, Nelson Algren, Ben Hecht, and an English novelist named Gerald Kersh. Kersh had these deep-set eyes, a hooked nose, and a bushy beard that swept, horizontally, straight away from his face. Cannon took one look at him and said, ‘That guy looks like a rat peering out of a bear’s ass.’

“Until I started working there I never even read the Post. It was a tabloid, but it was politically the most liberal of the seven New York dailies at the time, and it was seventh in circulation.

“But it was a fascinating place to work. Dorothy Schiff was the owner and publisher, so the Postwas way ahead of its time when it came to gender issues. Women who worked for the other New York dailies, including the Times, were shunted off to the ‘women’s pages’ – the style section, or the homemaking page – but even in the early 1960s the Posthad female reporters like Norah Ephron covering the important stuff like murders and politics.”

The dynamic in Tabloid Citybetween Briscoe and Bobby Fonseca, the young hotshot reporter the gruff old editor turns loose on the big story, suggests Hamill’s own history in the business, echoing both his relationship with Paul Sann, the Posteditor who in the 1960s made him into a columnist and then into a star, and Hamill’s subsequent encouragement of younger writers during his own editorial tenures at the Postand the Daily News.

“I learned from Sann and others that the best editors are teachers, in the positive sense of that word,” he says. “They don’t do their jobs to prove that they have power they just want the work to be better. They learned their craft the hard way and they want to pass it on to the young. I hope we can hold on to that tradition, which probably goes all the way back to the guild shops of the Renaissance. I like to say that journalism is the graduate school from which you never graduate.”

The impending demise, or at least the erosion, of traditional journalism is a dominant theme of Tabloid City.

At a meeting the morning after the murders, the World’s 28-year-old publisher has some more unsettling news for Briscoe: he intends to euthanise the paper, and the extra edition with the story of the murders will be the World’s last. But, he adds cheerfully, it will continue in an online format, and he’d like Sam to stay on as editor of the web version. Briscoe, whose veins course with newspaper ink, unhesitatingly declines, as surely as would have Pete Hamill.

“Obviously, I find the continuing disappearance of the American newspaper a depressing trend,” he says, “but at the same time I understand why it’s happening. Something like 70 per cent of a newspaper’s costs today goes to materials, production, and distribution, and only about 30 per cent to the editors and journalists who put it out. Producing an online version costs next to nothing, so the web would seem a viable way for journalists to keep working – and to be paid for it.”

Hamill provides each of the villains in his book with humanising qualities that explain their misguided motivation, which is more than can be said for one particular character, Freddie Wheeler, a laid-off former newspaperman-turned-blogger. Wheeler, who operates a poisonous scandal-sheet website that may represent the death of journalism as we know it (or perhaps the future of journalism as we don’t), is apparently devoid of any principle save schadenfreude.

“That was absolutely intentional,” says Hamill. “I didn’t have any real-life counterpart in mind, but nastiness and snarkiness are both alive and thriving on the web.”

But then Hamill (possibly because during his MacLaine/Ronstadt/Jackie O phase his own name turned up so frequently in gossip columns) has always been scornful when it comes to the journalistic merits of celebrity-based pap. When he took over the reins at the Daily News 15 years ago, one of his first acts was the elimination of popular “Hot Copy” columnists AJ Benza and Michael Lewittes.

“We have too much gossip, and not enough people to gossip about,” he said, in announcing that celebrities could henceforth expect to read their names in the paper “only if they die, get shot, or shoot their wives”.

Introducing Hamill at a symposium celebrating the publication of Tabloid Citya few weeks ago, fellow writer Adam Gopnik alluded to Tabloid City’s“recurrent theme of loneliness”, but he was quickly corrected by Hamill. While most of the novel’s characters do fly solo, some do so by choice.

“I would draw the distinction between loneliness and solitude,” says Hamill. “Many of us, particularly writers and artists, cherish our solitude.” He and Fukiko maintain separate working quarters in their Tribeca loft.

“Many people adjust to being alone by embracing solitude, rather than surrendering to loneliness, and there’s something almost ennobling about that. With a good book in the house, you’re never alone. But since being alone – at least in my opinion – can be most difficult at night, some people fill their nights with work.”

The denouement of Tabloid Cityarrives when the cast of characters arrives at a trendy Greenwich Village nightclub that is hosting a gala benefit. Even the bad guys are there in force, including Josh, a crippled Iraq veteran, and Malik, a jihadist. Both have chosen to bomb the venue.

“For Josh, it’s about payback for Malik, it’s about belief,” says Hamill. “This is a novel, remember, not an essay, but if I’ve learned anything in the last 50 years, it’s that both mindsets lead to corpses – and sometimes a lot of them. As a descendant of Belfast, I never needed to puzzle very much over the conflict between Sunnis and Shiites. Over centuries, secular beliefs, tied to utopian visions, have produced mounds of the dead. I prefer to invoke EM Forster’s line on the subject: ‘I do not believe in belief.’ ”

Malik Shahid might pray for the souls of the September 11th terrorists in Tabloid City, but Sam Briscoe honours departed icons of his own. He has, for instance, turned his newspaper’s lobby into a veritable monument to 20th-century American journalism. And when Briscoe allows his thoughts to wander, he nostalgically hearkens back to nights in the Lion’s Head and Bleeck’s, PJ Clarke’s and the Deux Magots, invoking the names of actual journalistic colleagues who might have been on the next bar stool at one saloon or the other.

“I’ve been accused of sentimentality, but, in general, I’ve never had the ambition to write a bitter, narrow, sullen novel about anyone, or to even old scores,” says Hamill. “I’ve met too many fundamentally decent people – including the sinners. At the same time, I always try to draw a distinction between nostalgia and sentimentality,” he elaborates.

“The first is a genuine evocation of lost times, lost friends and lost places. Sentimentality is the performance of regret – a gooey embrace of a reality you’ve never experienced, but wish you had. It’s no accident, for instance, that many right-wing movements like the Tea Party have a sentimental core. But New York is a dynamic city, always changing, never a museum. You go away for a month, and when you return your favourite coffee shop is gone and its presence is being hammered off the wall. Times Square today is so charmless that I think of it as Area Code 800, but it’s hard to be nostalgic about the place. 42nd Street wasn’t so great back when there were guys on every corner selling heroin like candy bars, either.”

Even though the major characters of Tabloid City experience misfortune that would rival the trials of Job, the book exudes a subtle undercurrent of hope that would seem to reflect New York’s defiance in the aftermath of 9/11.

“Even at our low points – during the crack epidemic that claimed an entire generation of our youth, for example – I’ve always been a reasonably optimistic man,” says Hamill. “Remember, I was born in the Depression I was 10 when the war ended and a flood of optimism surged through New York. The returning veterans had the GI bill, which in turn offered upward mobility, and anything seemed possible. Then came the 1960s which, at their best, were infused with hope and its brother, optimism. I soon adopted as my personal mantra a phrase from the Italian communist Antonio Gramsci: ‘Optimism of the will pessimism of the intelligence.’ ”

And sometimes life imitates art. After he is informed of the World’s imminent demise, Briscoe makes a list of priority phone calls he must make. The first is to his daughter, in Paris the second is to “Haberman at the Times”.

Last month, with copies of Tabloid City already in reviewers’ hands, the New York Timesaxed Clyde Haberman’s widely admired NYC column. The spurious move seemed nonsensical to Hamill who, like many New Yorkers, considered NYC essential reading.

A few weeks later – and two days after the May 2nd publication date of Tabloid City – the Times announced that, effective immediately, a new column by Haberman would be appearing four times a week.

But only in the paper’s online edition.

The author of Four Kings, Manly Art, and At the Fights: American Writers on Boxing(which he co-edited with John Schulian), George Kimball writes the America at Large column for The Irish Times. He and Pete Hamill have known one another for nearly 45 years, since, says Hamill, “we did our postgraduate studies together at the University of the Lion’s Head”.


Watch the video: Entertv: Η Νόρα Βαλσάμη για την υγεία της (May 2022).


Comments:

  1. Kippie

    Bravo, what is the right phrase ... a wonderful thought

  2. Turr

    I would write you a couple of gentle ones here, but I will refrain. Education does not allow)))

  3. Fenriramar

    I don't know what to say

  4. Armen

    I would like to say a few words.



Write a message