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Nanshe


Nanshe (also known as Nanse, Nazi) is the Sumerian goddess of social justice and divination, whose popularity eventually transcended her original boundaries of southern Mesopotamia toward all points throughout the region in the 3rd millennium BCE. She watched over orphans and widows, oversaw fairness, fresh water, birds and fish, fertility, and favored prophets, giving them the ability to interpret dreams accurately. She was also known as the Lady of the Storerooms and, in this capacity, made sure that weights and measures were correct. It was originally in this role, connected to commerce, that her popularity grew.

She was the daughter of Enki, god of wisdom and fresh water, and Ninhursag, the Mother Goddess (though she is also referenced as the daughter of Enlil). In some myths, she is sister to Nisaba, goddess of writing, and the hero-god Ninurta and, in others, the sister of Inanna and Ereshkigal. Her consort was Haia, god of storerooms, and her vizier was Hendursag who was in charge of judging people's deeds and transgressions. Her husband/consort was originally Nindara, Hendursag's older brother, the local god of Lagash, known as a great warrior and the 'tax collector of the sea,' though the meaning of the epithet is unclear. However, she is most commonly associated with Haia. Nanshe was especially concerned for refugees fleeing war-torn regions, and these found sanctuary at her Sirara temple in the town of Nina, city of Lagash.

She is depicted on a cylinder seal as a woman dancing above water flanked by two winged Anuna (gods of the earth) with the winged solar disc above her (the Assyrian symbol of Utu-Shamash, god of justice). Enki gave her the responsibility for the waters of the Persian Gulf and all the creatures who dwelt therein, and she is frequently referenced in connection to water. She is also represented by the symbol of the fish and the pelican; the fish connects her with water but also symbolizes life, while the pelican, who, in legend, is said to sacrifice itself to feed its young, symbolized her devotion to humanity.

In all the inscriptions and hymns which mention her, Nanshe is portrayed as kind, compassionate, welcoming, and wise. She is probably best known from the Gudea Cylinders, two terracotta cylinders of the text The Building of Ningirsu's Temple, dated to c. 2125 BCE, in which she interprets the dream of Gudea, governor of Lagash (c. 2144-2124 BCE), and encourages him to build a temple for his god.

Nanshe's Origin in Myth

The in the myth Enki and Ninhursag, the two deities become lovers while staying in the land of Dilmun (a region of fertility and peace near the Persian Gulf). Ninhursag must return to her duties back home, and Enki, left alone, has an affair with their daughter, then her daughter, and then her daughter before he also must leave. This youngest daughter, Uttu, complains of her ill treatment to Ninhursag who advises her to wipe Enki's seed from her body and bury it in the ground. She does so, and beautiful plants spring from the earth.

When Enki returns to Dilmun with his vizier Isimud, he sees the plants and wants to taste them, eventually eating them all. Ninhursag finds out and curses Enki with the eye of death and then deserts the realm of the gods for a far off sanctuary. Enki falls ill and is near death when Ninhursag returns. She draws him to her and asks where his pain is. Each time he answers, she draws the pain into her own body, transforms it into something good, and gives birth, one by one, to eight deities who will benefit humanity: Abu (god of plants and growth), Nintulla (Lord of Magan, a region associated with copper and diorite), Ninsitu (goddess of healing, consort of Ninazu, the god of healing), Ninkasi (goddess of beer), Nanshe (goddess of social justice and divination), Azimua (goddess of healing and fertility, wife of Ningishida of the underworld), Ninti (goddess of the rib, she who gives life), and Emshag (Lord of Dilmun and living things). Of these eight, Ninkasi and Nanshe would become the best known and most often venerated.

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Goddess of Justice

Her name spread through commerce, owing to her concern for justice and fair play. She made sure that weights and measures were correct and no one was cheated in the marketplace. In ancient Mesopotamia, if one wanted a certain amount of grain, it was placed on a scale balanced against a certain amount of weight to determine the price. These weights could be toyed with to reflect a different gauge than they actually were and so cheat a customer in paying more for less. Nanshe was invoked as protection against such practices and also in swearing oaths that one was trading fairly. Once one had sworn, it was in one's best interests to keep that oath because, although Nanshe was a kind goddess, she would not hesitate to vent her wrath on those who displeased her through transgressions. A part of one of her hymns lists those who may expect to suffer at her hands:

People who, walking in transgression, reached out with a high hand
Who transgress the established norms, violate contracts
Who looked with favor on the places of evil
Who substituted a small weight for a large weight
Who substituted a small measure for a large measure
Who, having eaten something not belonging to him, did not say "I have eaten it"
Who, having drunk, did not say "I have drunk it"
Who said, "I would eat that which is forbidden
Who said, "I would drink that which is forbidden.

(Kramer, 125)

The same hymn also describes those Nanshe cares for. Nanshe is the goddess who looks after the forgotten, the poor, the lonely, and disenfranchised.

[Nanshe is she] who knows the orphan, who knows the widow
Knows the oppression of man over man, is the orphan's mother
Nanshe, who cares for the widow
Who seeks out justice for the poorest
The queen brings the refugee to her lap
Finds shelter for the weak.

(Kramer, 124)

In this capacity, she was linked with Utu-Shamash, the Sumerian/Akkadian god of justice represented by the sun. Just as the sun saw all things on the earth below as he crossed the sky, so too did Utu-Shamash. Nanshe, however, was much more accessible.

Worship of the Goddess

Nanshe was worshiped from the 3rd millennium BCE throughout Mesopotamia's history and into the Christian era. Her symbols of the fish and the pelican, in fact, were appropriated by the early Christians for their god. Nanshe's temple at Lagash was more than just a place of worship. Hymns from the time of Gudea describe her priestesses and priests feeding the poor, caring for the sick, looking after the orphan and widow, and involved in social justice on other levels.

Nanshe's symbols of the fish & the pelican were appropriated by the early Christians for their god.

On the first day of the new year, a great festival was held at her temple which people from all across the land attended. They would first ritually cleanse themselves and then submit to the Ordeal. The Ordeal was a common practice in ancient Mesopotamia whereby guilt or innocence was established by the gods through the simplest means: the accused was thrown into a river, and if they survived, then they were innocent. Visitors who wished an audience with Nanshe to settle some legal dispute or gain a vision of the future had to submit to the Ordeal before entering the temple complex. It is unclear whether every visitor who came to the festival had to do likewise, but most likely they did not. Those who came asking for a vision of the future or dream interpretation, however, had to be pure in heart for Nanshe to receive them and would certainly have had to prove themselves free of sin. The most famous recipient of Nanshe's benevolence was the governor of Lagash, Gudea, who did not need to submit to the Ordeal to consult her because of his great devotion to the gods and their will.

Gudea's Dream Vision

Gudea is the best-known Mesopotamian ruler even though most people do not know his name. His piety and work in preserving the literary and religious traditions of Sumer, in addition to his efforts in temple building, elevated him to such a high status in his lifetime that he was worshiped during the later Ur III Period (2047-1700 BCE) as a god. Even if one has never heard his name, if one has even a nodding acquaintance with Mesopotamian art, one has seen the statue of the robed man, hands clasped, praying; that is Gudea. While there are many such statues depicting different Sumerian men and women at prayer, Gudea's is the most often featured in modern day publications.

In one of the most complete and compelling Sumerian texts extant, Gudea recorded a dream in which the god of the city of Lagash, Ningirsu (later known as Ninurta) came to honor him by asking for a temple. The dream vision is given as though the events took place in his waking life and is here given in translation with commentary by the Orientalist Samuel Noah Kramer:

In the dream, Gudea saw a man of tremendous stature with a divine crown on his head, the wings of a lion-headed bird, and a "flood wave" as the lower part of his body; lions crouched to his right and left. This huge man commanded Gudea to build his temple, but he could not grasp the meaning of his words. Day broke - in the dream - and a woman appeared holding a gold stylus and studying a clay tablet on which the starry heaven was depicted. Then a 'hero' appeared holding a tablet of lapis lazuli on which he drew a plan of a house; he also placed bricks in a brick mold which stood before Gudea together with a carrying basket. At the same time a specially bred male donkey was impatiently pawing the ground.

Since the meaning of the dream was not clear to him, Gudea decided to consult the goddess Nanshe, who interpreted dreams for the gods. But Nanshe lived in a district of Lagash called Nina, which could best be reached by canal. Gudea therefore journeyed to her by boat, making sure to stop at several important shrines along the way to offer sacrifices and prayers to their deities in order to obtain their support. Finally the boat arrived at the quay of Nina, and Gudea went with lifted head to the court of the temple where he made sacrifices, poured out libations, and offered prayers. He then told her his dream and she interpreted it for him point by point, thus:

The man of tremendous stature with a divine crown on his head, the wings of a lion-headed bird, a flood wave as the lower part of his body, and lions crouching to his right and left - that is [my] brother Ningirsu, who commanded [you] to build the temple eninnu. The breaking of day over the horizon - that is Ningishzida, Gudea's personal god, rising like the sun. The woman holding a gold stylus and studying a clay tablet on which the starry heaven was depicted - that is Nisaba (the goddess of writing and the patron deity of the edubba), who directs you to build the house in accordance with the "holy stars". The hero holding a tablet of lapis lazuli - that is the architect god Nindub drawing the temple plan. The carrying basket and brick mold in which "the brick of fate" was placed - these betoken the bricks for the Eninnu temple. The male donkey pawing the ground impatiently - that, of course, is Gudea himself, who is impatient to carry out his task. (138-139)

Gudea woke from his dream and, after prayer and sacrifice thanking Nanshe, reported his dream vision to his people and asked for their support. They responded with great enthusiasm, and the poem detailing the vision ends with the completion of the Temple of Ningirsu at Larsa.

The Gudea Cylinders present Nanshe as the wise and helpful goddess so many people of Mesopotamia responded to, and hymns and other inscriptions are consistent in this depiction. In the myth Enki and the World Order, to name only one, Nanshe is contrasted with her sister Inanna quite favorably. Even though Inanna was the most popular goddess in Mesopotamia, she is frequently depicted as a spoiled brat throwing a temper tantrum until she gets what she wants, and in Enki and the World Order, she is seen in exactly this way.

After Enki has created the world and assigned a place and function to every living thing, including the gods, Inanna confronts him complaining that everyone else has greater gifts than she does. She mentions Nanshe toward the end of her rant, pointing out the wonderful aspects given to her but denied to Inanna. Enki's response is, "What did I keep from you? What more could we add to you?" before listing all of the very impressive attributes she has already been given. Throughout Inanna's tirade, Nanshe is notably silent, as are the rest of the gods. Inanna does not need for them to judge her because her own angry words of ingratitude, and Enki's gentle response, have done that already.

Nanshe as Comforter and Companion

Unlike Inanna or even Enki, Nanshe has no myths in which she is depicted as petty, selfish, or thoughtless. She is consistently a defender of the disenfranchised, companion to the outcast, the poor, the sick, widows, orphans, and foreigners seeking refuge in a strange land. She is companion to the traveler and stranger and a friend to all in her community. One of her hymns makes clear that her central role was:

To comfort the orphan, to make disappear the widow
To set up a place of destruction for the mighty
To turn over the mighty to the weak
Nanshe searches the heart of the people.

(Kramer, 125)

If this were so, one might ask, why was the goddess so popular when it was as obvious in ancient Mesopotamia as it is today that orphans and widows and refugees are not always cared for, quite often are not, and the mighty who care for no one but themselves and their own personal interests are not turned over to the weak nor do they seem to fear any imminent destruction.

The answer for the people of Mesopotamia was that, even though Nanshe meant them only the best, some other god or demon or spirit could have other plans in mind. The best one could do was place one's trust in the goddess, appeal to her in times of need, give thanks and rejoice with her in times of plenty, and simply hope that the power of Nanshe would prevail over the forces of darkness and despair. The most effective way to ensure this outcome, of course, was to work for the values Nanshe embodied, calling on her for protection and guidance, and trying to spread her light in one's daily life.


Nanshe

In Sumerian mythology, Nanshe was the daughter of Enki (god of wisdom, magic and fresh water) and Ninhursag (earth and mother goddess). Her functions as a goddess were varied. She was a goddess of social justice, prophecy, fertility and fishing. Like her father, she was heavily associated with water. She held dominion over the Persian Gulf and all the animals within. Her seat of power was the Sirara temple, located in the city of Nina.


Species

Nanshe had grown up with her twin sister, Kyra who were one day destined to rule Athura Dahyu. One day, their grandmother woke up for a dream, telling that one of her grand daughters would usurp the throne. In order to prevent this, she sent an assassin out to kill them both, however the assassin's loyalty was with Nanshe and Kyra and eventually betrayed her by telling the sisters of their grandmother's plans. Nanshe felt the it would be best for them to escape with their lives, however Kyra despised the thought of their grandmother still on the throne. Leaving the empire, Nanshe sought help to fight against her grandmother, requesting help from cousins and other family members, all of which were turned down. After almost all hope was lost, a priestess named Rubati was willing to help. The two joined forces to seek Joy, a holy human warrior who could end the war in exchange for help with the resistance against her grandmother.

After fighting through monstergirl armies, the church begrudgingly offered aid to the resistance and helped overthrow Rishti. Arriving back to the kingdom, Nanshe reunited with her sister and continued to fight alongside her.

After Queen Viaga's death, Kyra usurped the throne while Nanshe continued to adventure with the heroines.

Since the separation of the heroines, Nanshe was skeptical about The Overmind's defeat, knowing one day he would return. She was abandoned by her fellow heroines in a graveyard and raised an army of the dead, waiting for The Overmind to return.

As Nanshe predicted, The Overmind had once again risen, but was weak. Nanshe saw this as an opportunity to ensnare The Overmind in a trap. Unfortunately, her having the upperhand was not enough and was struck by a potion causing unintelligence. While weakened, she was hypnotized by the orgasm matrix and becoming an obedient slave of The Overmind


Nanshe

Nanshe was not always influenced by the potion. She was initially, but after that she only pretended and decided it was not good for her to go home. Instead she stayed with Overmind. She claims to be the smartest around, which is true. She was the only one who has seen herself being corrupted. Her regrets dont come from killing under Overlord, whom he considered to be the best person, but from her previous life, killing innocents and turning them into undead. She had a sister, Kyra, who was supposed to rule Athura Dahyu, their homeland. Their grandmother had a stupid dream that one of them will usurp the throne, so she wanted to kill them. Nanshe went to elves in order to ask them for help, but was rejected. Rubati persuaded her to help in their fight so that the council of elves would be forced to help her. She is the second companion of Joy, after Rubati. Nanshe taught Joy everything she knew about magic. After one fight, Joy grew angelic wings. After their return, they met with Kyra, who had to endure assassins and all the other unpleasant things. Kyra became the new queen and Nanshe became a Heroine of Diligence.


Inanna and Nanshe

I learned about the Greek and Roman gods and goddesses as a child. But the Sumerian ones? Only recently. Here are a few tantalizing details about Inanna (goddess of writing, civilization, war, love, sex changes, and much more) and Nanshe (goddess of social justice).

She’s a major god in the Sumerian pantheon, a direct descendant of Nannu, the primeval mother of heaven and earth. She was worshipped for thousands of years and bears a strong resemblance to other lands’ goddesses, such as Ishtar, Aprhodite, and Venus. Sumerians sang many hymns and told many stories about her.

Enheduanna, the first person ever to sign her name to a work of writing, prayed to Inanna as her personal god.

Inanna is the one who first brought civilization to the people. Sumerians tell of the divine me’s — no translation is possible because they’re laws, events, and qualities for instance: irrigation, the flood, suffering, joy. Once upon a time, Enki had all the me’s, and Inanna, his daughter, journeyed to visit him. They drank a lot, and then he gave her all the me’s. He later regretted it and sent minions after her to retrieve them, but too late!

In another story, Inanna journeys to the underworld, just because she can. Her sister, who rules the underworld, has her stripped naked and killed, but she gets out again with the help of her faithful assistant. But the underworld demanded somebody in her place, and that somebody turned out to be her faithless husband Dumuzi.

Nanshe
Nanshe is the goddess who looks out for widows, orphans, beggars, the debt-slave — the socially disenfranchised. She’s in charge of making sure that weights and measures are fair and accurate. And boy, does she run her temple like a tight ship. For instance, her temple hymns say:

“If the grain does not suffice for these rites and the vessels are empty and do not pour water, the person in charge of the regular offerings does not receive extra.”

The hymns also specify that priests can be fired or denied rations if they step out of line. People who ate and say they didn’t are also in trouble, as are mothers who deny food to their children.

She’s a powerful goddess, Nanshe, who “cares for all the countries,” who delivers the powerful to the powerless, who “sees into the heart of the Land as if it were a split reed.”

If You Had to Choose
Sumerians worshipped the entire pantheon, but they had one god in particular as their personal god. If you had to choose between these two, which would you serve? This question has special significance to me right now, because with everything going on in Libya, in Wisconsin, etc., it seems like right now is the time for some good social justice action — but what my soul craves is a long bath in the sea of story. I haven’t been writing stories in a year or more, and the lack is painful. Can I do both?

More Goddessy Goodness

For the authentic best-guess translations of Sumerian texts, check out the Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Literature. That’s where I snagged the quotes about Nanshe (A hymn to Nanshe: translation).

Nanshe, along with Inanna, also appears in Enheduanna’s temple hymns. There’s a lovely PDF of some of the hymns here.

I first met Enheduanna in the book Humming the Blues: Inspired by Nin-Me-Sar-Ra, Enheduanna’s Song to Inanna by Cass Dalglish.

The best place for a retelling of Inanna’s stories is the book Inanna by Kim Echlin and Linda Wofsgruber. It made me want to cry for poor Dumuzi, and for Inanna, who apparently regretted banishing him to the underworld. The somewhat stilted language of the “authentic” translation is made more accessible in this retelling, and the poetic spareness lets the beauty of the story shine through.


This package is designed to perform segmentation on datasets containing spatially-fixed components with time varying intensity. As the techniques used are a bit slow, the segmentation algorithm has been designed to run in batch. The segmentation algorithm has been further tailored to enable multiprocessing as well as support for clusters that support DRMAA ( http://www.drmaa.org ). In addition to the segmentation algorithm, it provides a converter for TIFF to HDF5 and a rough viewer for inspecting the results obtained.

The first item contained inside the package is nanshe_converter.py . This is designed to convert external formats to HDF5 (the native format used by Nanshe). Currently, only TIFF stacks are supported.

To run the converter, simply run the command below. The first argument specifies the input format. Currently, this is just tiff. The configuration parameters are contained in the config.json file. An example configuration file can be found in the examples folder. The input images can be specified using a regex as can be seen below. The output file is an HDF5 with a dataset containing the result. Here, output.h5 is the output file. The data is stored in the specified dataset, which is /images within root.

The next item contained inside the package is nanshe_learner.py . This runs the segmentation algorithm using a specified set of parameters on a provided dataset and stores the result.

To run the learner, simply run the command below. The configuration parameters are contained in the config.json file. Sample configuration files are included in the examples folder. One example is for a single process and is called nanshe_learner.json . Another example uses multiprocessing and is called nanshe_learner_multiprocessing.json . The input data is stored within the HDF5 input.h5 in the top level group in the dataset images . The output file can be the same file or a different file. Here, output.h5 is the output file. The data is stored in the specified group, which is root as can be seen by the following / . The extracted neurons will be put in a compound data type (a.k.a. a structured array) called neurons . Various results including the masks (under the field mask ) will be stored here. The first index on neurons will indicate which neuron is selected. All remaining indices for different types follow C-order convention (excepting gaussian_cov , which is the covariance matrix and slightly differs for obvious reasons).

The first item contained inside the package is nanshe_viewer.py . This runs the segmentation algorithm using a specified set of parameters on a provided dataset and stores the result.

To run the viewer, simply run the command below. The configuration parameters are contained in the config.json file. These specify how the layers are ordered, grouped, and named. Also, they specify where to fetch the data for the layers. Lastly, they specify where this data is located in an HDF5 file. The input data is stored within the HDF5 input.h5 .

There are some prebuilt binaries that are available. These are built using BuildEM ( https://github.com/janelia-flyem/buildem ). The binaries are designed to be largely independent of your own system. These contain all the dependencies needed to run everything used by Nanshe except for the ones explicitly required and excluded from BuildEM.

To run any of the above utilities, there is a run_*.sh command that will do this. For example, here is how you would call the nanshe_learner.

It is also possible to submit jobs to cluster using the Open Grid Engine, which have DRMAA installed. This is done using qrun_*.sh commands as seen below. In the case of nanshe_learner, a special configure file is required, which can be found in the example directory. If DRMAA is not available, it is possible to run multiprocessing as mentioned above.


File:Stele or obelisk of Ur-Nanshe with goddess Nisaba, ruler of Lagash, from Lagash, Iraq, 26th century BCE. Iraq Museum.jpg

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A Hymn to Nanshe: translation A

1-9 There is a city, there is a city whose powers are apparent.

Nijin is the city whose powers are apparent.

The holy city is the city whose powers are apparent.

The mountain rising from the water is the city whose powers are apparent.

Its light rises over the secure temple its fate is determined.

( Nanshe , respected daughter of Enki’s , goddess over the Persian Gulf)

There is perfection in the city the rites of mother Nance ( Enki‘s daughter ) are performed accordingly.

Its lady, the child born in Eridug (Eridu , Enki ‘s patron city) ,

Nance , the lady of the precious divine powers, is now to return.

10-19 She is beer mash (?), the mother is yeast (?),

Nance is the cause of great things: her presence makes the storehouses of the land bulge

( 1 ms. has instead: prosper) and makes the honey …… like resin in the storerooms.

Because of her, there stand vessels with ever-flowing water

(Sumer, 1st to farm)

because of Nance , the baskets containing the treasures of the Land

cover the ground like the silt of the river.

20-31 She is concerned for the orphan and concerned for the widow.

She does not forget the man who helps (?) others, she is a mother for the orphan

Nance , a carer for the widow, who always finds advice for the debt-slave

the lady who gives protection for refugees.

She seeks out a place for the weak.

She swells his collecting basket for him she makes his collecting vessel profitable for him.

For the righteous maiden who has taken her path, Nance chooses a young man of means.

Nance raises a secure house like a roof over the widow who could not remarry.

32-46 There is perfection in the presence of the lady.

Lagac thrives in abundance in the presence of Nance .

( King Ur-Nanshe & spouse with Nanshe‘s mother Ninhursag )

She chose the cennu in her holy heart and seated (King) Ur-Nance ,

the beloved lord of Lagac ( Lagash ) , on the throne.

She gave the lofty scepter to the shepherd.

She adorned (King) Gudea with all her precious divine powers (alien technologies) .

( Gudea , son-king of Ninsun‘s , Ninurta‘s 2/3rds divine mixed-breed grandson)

The shepherd chosen by her in her holy heart, Gudea , the ruler of Lagac , placed the lyre (?)

Cow-of-Abundance among the tigi drums and placed the holy balaj drum at its side.

While sacred songs and harmonious songs were performed before her,

(1st with beer, music, & song)

the kintur instrument praised the temple.

The chief musician played the ibex horn for her: the song

(Abzu, Enki‘s ziggurat & domain)

‘The house has been granted powers from the Abzu’,

the sacred song of the house of Sirara about the princely powers was performed.

47-58 The dream interpreter went into the sacristy and made glittering silver ecde cups ready for her.

The temple cook ……, and prepared hot and cold food for her.

He …… of the oven for her (?) and …… made the great shovel bellow for her.

After the meat had arrived in large bowls and cool water had been brought from the Sirara -canal ,

(land of the gods between the rivers)

after the festival trappings had arrived from Lagac and wine had been brought from the countryside,

her great oven which vies with the great dining hall, Nance ‘s shrine of food offerings, was humming.

59-64 The lady, the matriarch of Enlil , Nance , the lady of abundance who lives in in the Land,

( Nanshe , child of Enki , Fish & Bird Goddess of the Persian Gulf)

the ……, the child of Enki , acting as a good woman for a good household, is to make the appointments.

After she, as a good woman for a good household, has made the appointments,

the regular offerings and daily goods of the house arrive unfailingly from the Bursaj .

65-75 If (?) the grain does not suffice for these rites and the the vessels are empty and do not pour water,

the person in charge of the regular offerings does not receive extra.

After what was distributed from the foods and what was distributed from the drinks,

after what was left over from the regular offerings and was not used by the house,

after what was expended from the taxed fish, after what …… one iku of reed-beds ……,

and after what was received in nuts ouch them.

No one should carry the bread of the shrines in the district as bread allotment.

76-82 The preparation for the temple’s permanent first-fruit festival should not stop.

Let there be a fat carrier who delivers fat to the house,

(earthlings feeding the alien gods)

let there be a milk carrier who delivers milk to the house

and let there be a fish courier, a person of daily assignment.

After the firewood carrier has brought his delivery from the open country into his lady’s house,

it should be deposited in its corners and sides.

He who confirms or contradicts what is uttered,

(Nanshe, Goddess over the Birds & Fishes of the Persian Gulf)

who enters Nance ‘s house from outside (?), and does not leave it,

the caretaker of Nance ‘s house , the child born to Utu , lord Hendursaja …….

The king discriminates between the good and the evil deeds,

( Utu , the Sun God , Commander of the Space Ports, son to Nannar )

Hendursaja ( Utu ‘s & Aia’s son) discriminates between the good and the evil deeds.

The …… which might be obstructed by evil he …….

the heroic child of youthful Suen ( Sin / Nannar ) , …… the evil utterances for Nance .

92-93 May the lady of the right commands and inalienable divine powers,

( Nanshe , Inanna , & Ningal seated Persian Gulf fish & fowl of Nanshe )

Nance , be praised in all the countries!

94-112 At new year, on the day of rites, the lady libates water on the holy …….

On the day when the bowls of rations are inspected,

Nance also inspects the servants during the appointments.

/> /> /> ( Nisaba , Enlil’s mother-in-law, Goddess of Scribes & Grains)

Her chief scribe Nisaba places the precious tablets on her knees and takes a golden stylus in her hand.

She arranges the servants in single file for Nance and then it will be decided whether or not

a leather-clad servant can enter before her in his leather,

whether or not a linen-clad servant can pass before her in his linen.

Any registered and …… hired (?) person about whom observers (?)

and witnesses claim to witness his fleeing from the house will be terminated in his position …….

The king who always cares for the faithful servants,

( Enlil with plow , Haia registering on a tablet , his spouse Nisaba & their daughter Ninlil , Enlil‘s equal spouse)

Haia , the man in charge of registration, registers on a tablet

him who is said to be a faithful servant of his lady

but deletes from the tablet her who is said not to be the maidservant of her lady.

113-129 If the vessels pour no water, the roads are not in order,

the dough trough is not kept clean, the fire is …… in the house during (?) the night-time,

the incantations are …… in the house during (?) the day-time,

then the cita-aba priest serving his term will be terminated from his office.

For a susbu priest who serves his term administering food allotments

and against whom a complaint has been lodged and for a sajja priest who while living in the house

did not make her holy songs and thoughts manifest (?), …… further rations are denied

and thereby mother Nance ‘s ordinances will become apparent.

These words are ultimate nothing is to be added to these rites.

No one should …… other powers to these powers.

Since not even one ……, no …… enters Nance‘s house (in Lagash ) .

130-136 At Nance ‘s house, the river of the ordeal cleanses a person.

After the oracular messages and (?) the holy songs have come out of ……

of the Abzu (marshlands of Enki‘s patron city Eridu on the Persian Gulf), …… the songs,

and the enkum and ninkum priests choose (?) the purification rites.

No …… or …… are to be added its words.

No obstinate or threatening utterance shall arise.

137-153 Anyone who …… his hand and reaches out (?) for something forcefully (?),

and whose hand matches (?) his mouth and who commits violence,

who …changes a firm foundation or alters a marked out border, who is rushing (?) to the place of oath,

who …… a small weight in place (?) of a large weight,

and …… a small ban measure in place (?) of a large ban measure,

who desire something after having acquired something,

who does not say “I have eaten” after having eaten,

and does not say “I have drunk” after having drunk,

and then says, “I will set a bowl before you, I will filter beer for you”

a maidservant of a god who …… and …… from the house,

an untrustworthy person who …… while living in the house

if anyone says “Serve (?) me, I want to eat”, or says “Serve (?) me,

I want to drink”, then Nance does not allow him to eat any bread

with fat or shining eggs, because of the violation (?).

154-162 If the violent person was allowed to eat ……, with (?) …… eyes,

paralyzed mouth, shuffling feet, he does not …… and does not …….

The powerful one who ……, the rich one who …… on the street,

the married one who …… his wife for (?) the widow,

who laughed one day in his rage, who makes fun of his calamity another day —

this person does not raise his …… for (?) the lady.

163-174 For the lady who cares for all the countries, the queen, mother Nance , sees into their hearts:

the orphan who ……, the widow who ……, the waif delivered up to the powerful,

the powerful delivered to the powerless, the mother who scolds at her child,

the child who talks obstinately to his mother,

the younger brother who talks against his elder brother or talks back his his father.

Nance sees into the heart of the Land as if it were a split reed.

175-18 0 Her herald lord Hendursaja ( Utu ‘s son, Nanshe‘s House Master) …….

Her protecting genius Dumu-tur-cugi does not ……, her guardian placed ……, guarding …….

Nance ….. . her house in Sirara (temple district of gods in Lagash ) sprinkled with water,

her house …… during (?) the night-time.

181-192 He who extends his staff of office, the one respected within the Abzu,

( Enki’s goddess daughter Nanshe )

the lord who has no opposition in the terraced tower (?) of Nance‘s house,

the king, lord Hendursaja , promulgates the decrees o f Nance‘s house.

They are heavy smoke settling on the ground the commands of the house

are thick clouds covering the sky as if they were joined together with the needle of matrimony,

yet the king, lord Hendursaja , tears them apart.

He can discriminate between the just and the wicked,

and he can bring justice to the orphan as well as to the widow.

193-211 He decides justly any lawsuits between mother and child:

if the mother has given to the child what she had to eat,

has given to it what she had to drink, has ……,

and his mother …… the firewood carrier’s delivery from the open country,

and yet the child does not speak to the mother

who bore him in the great city with black looks (?) or in anger

and if the mother ordered her child to the place where the offense happened

and the mother struck him at his ……,

but nevertheless she has given him suck from her milk-filled breast,

then, after the king who loves justice,

Hendursaja , has evaluated their testimonies and examined the case,

he will place the blame on the mother of the child

so that she will not be able to bear the weight of heavy blame,

and there will be no god such a person could pray to.

212-221 If the mother has not given to the child what she had to eat,

has not given to it what she had to drink, has not ……

and his mother …… the firewood carrier’s delivery from the open country,

and the child speaks to the mother who bore him in the great city

with black looks (?) and in anger, then the king who hates violence,

Hendursaja , will treat such a person like water in a filthy place,

and will reject that child for her sake as grain is rejected by acid soil.

223-231 The guarantor of boundaries, the expert in (?) righteous words,

( Ninsun , daughter to Ninurta , mother to giant 2/3rds divine king Gudea)

lady, wise woman who founded Lagac ( Lagash ) …… with Jatumdug ( Ninsun ) .

( Enlil instructs son Ninurta & granddaughter Inanna )

The exalted lady whose commands are ……, the lady who like Enlil determines fates,

who is seated on the throne of Sirara (also used as her name)

she, the pure one, looks at her powers.

232-240 At the house which has been granted powers from the Abzu,

in Sirara , the gods of Lagac gather around her.

To weigh silver with standard weights, to standardize the size of reed baskets,

(standardized weights & measures, 1st used in Sumer, land of advanced giant alien gods)

they establish an agreed ban measure throughout the countries.

The shepherd, the expert of the Land, the wise one (?) of the countries,

( Ninurta , grandfather of King Gudea )

Ictaran ( Ninurta ) , who decides lawsuits justly, who lives in the Land ……

( Ninsun , her 2/3rds divine son King Gudea , & Ningishzidda )

241-250 To weigh silver with standard weights, to standardize the size of reed baskets (a bushel) ,

they establish an agreed ban measure throughout the countries.

After …… in (?) the established storerooms, the lady of the storerooms ……

her lofty …… with (?) vessels with ever-flowing water

and with (?) …… of (?) reed containers which never become empty,

she ordered her herald, lord Hendursaja to make them profitable (?).

251-255 My lady, your divine powers (alien technologies) are mighty powers,

surpassing all other divine powers Nance , there are no divine powers matching your powers.

( Anu , the sole authority & King over planet Nibiru & their Earth Colony project)

An ( Anu ) , the king, looks joyfully at you,

as you sit with Enlil on the throne-dais where the fates are to be determined.

Father Enki determined a fate for you.

( Enki ‘s daughter, Eridu ruins, Enki‘s patron city)


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Nanshe

In Sumerian mythology, Nanshe was the daughter of Enki (god of wisdom, magic and fresh water) and Ninhursag (earth and mother goddess). Her functions as a goddess were varied. She was a goddess of social justice, prophecy, fertility and fishing. Like her father, she was heavily associated with water. She held dominion over the Persian Gulf and all the animals within. Her seat of power was the Sirara temple, located in the city of Nina.

Birth of Nanshe

Nanshe’s birth is described in the Sumerian myth ‘Enki and Ninhursag.’ In the tale, Enki consumes several forbidden plants under the protection of his wife. In retaliation, Ninhursag places a curse on him. Enki soon becomes crippled with ailments, and the gods are left helpless. Enlil , the powerful sky god, manages to ease Ninhursag’s anger after sending a fox , a sacred animal of Ninhursag, to speak with her. She then returns to Enki’s side and lifts the curse. To heal Enki, Ninhursag gives birth to several healing gods. Nanshe (referred to as Nazi in the original myth) was meant to heal her father’s neck. At the conclusion of the myth, she is betrothed to the god Nindara.

The World Order

Nanshe’s father, Enki, was later tasked with organizing the world and assigning every god a function. Nanshe was assigned dominion over the Persian Gulf, on which floated her father’s awe inspiring sea shrine. As a secondary function, she was to ensure than shipments of fish reached the mainland. When heading onto the mainland, she sailed by barge from the Gulf. She had a strong connection with wildlife, especially birds and bats. In one hymn, she converses with ravens and pelicans , among other species.

The Goddess of Social Justice

During the time of Gudea (2144 – 2124 BC), many hymns to Nanshe appeared showing her in an elevated position in the pantheon. She was the widely worshiped goddess of social justice. She nurtured orphans, provided for widows, gave advice to those in debt, and took in refugees from war torn areas. [1] Several other gods appeared to be under the command of Nanshe. Hendursag and Haia were her assistants. Nisaba , sometimes portrayed as Nanshe’s sister, was her chief scribe.

On the first day of the new year, a festival was held at her temple. People came from all over the land to seek her wisdom and aid. Visitors were cleansed in the river of ordeals and then, if worthy, given an audience with the goddess. Nanshe settled disputes and handled court cases amongst mortals.

Holding a higher ranking in the pantheon during this era, Nanshe sometimes shared the same tasks as Utu, the traditional god of justice. She sat on the holy thrones with the other prominent gods, and was seen as a goddess of protection. At one point, Ninurta , the mighty god of war, turns to her for guidance.

The Goddess of Prophecy

Nanshe had the ability to give oracular messages and determine the future through dream interpretation ( Oneiromancy ). Her priests were also granted these abilities after conducting a ritual that represented death and resurrection. Despite the ritual, Nanshe is not depicted as life-death-rebirth deity in any known hymns or myths.

The Guarantor of Boundaries – The Lady of the Storerooms

In the Nanše Hymn she is described as having a role seeing that weights and measures are correct. [2]

223-231The guarantor of boundaries, the expert in (?) righteous words, lady, wise woman who founded Lagac … with Jatumdug. … righteous words for (?) Nance. The exalted lady whose commands are … the lady who like Enlil determines fates, who is seated on the throne of Sirara — she, the pure one, looks at her powers. 232-240 At the house which has been granted powers from the abzu, in Sirara, the gods of Lagac gather around her. To weigh silver with standard weights, to standardise the size of reed baskets, they establish an agreed ban measure throughout the countries. The shepherd, the expert of the Land, the wise one (?) of the countries, Ictaran, who decides lawsuits justly, who lives in the Land … Ninjiczida … 2 lines unclear 241-250To weigh silver with standard weights, to standardise the size of reed baskets, they establish an agreed ban measure throughout the countries. … of (?) all the great rites. 1 line unclear After … in (?) the established storerooms, the lady of the storerooms … her lofty … with (?) vessels with ever-flowing water and with (?) … of (?) reed containers which never become empty, she ordered her herald, lord Hendursaja to make them profitable (?).

Other Functions

The Nanše Hymn attributes to Nanshe, in her role as a protective goddess, special concern for vulnerable members of society:

20-31 She is concerned for the orphan and concerned for the widow. She does not forget the man who helps (?) others, she is a mother for the orphan Nance, a carer for the widow, who always finds advice for the debt-slave the lady who gives protection for refugees. She seeks out a place for the weak. She swells his collecting basket for him she makes his collecting vessel profitable for him. For the righteous maiden who has taken her path, Nance chooses a young man of means. Nance raises a secure house like a roof over the widow who could not remarry.

She is also — perhaps due to her role as Lady of the Storeroom and its associated aspects of fertility and bounty — associated with beer mash, yeast, and honey:

10-19 She is beer mash (?), the mother is yeast (?), Nance is the cause of great things: her presence makes the storehouses of the land bulge (1 ms. has instead: prosper) and makes the honey … like resin in the storerooms. Because of her, there stand vessels with ever-flowing water because of Nance, the baskets containing the treasures of the Land cover the ground like the silt of the river. She is the lady of … 2 lines unclear


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