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The Pacific War Uncensored, Harold Guard with John Tring


The Pacific War Uncensored, Harold Guard with John Tring

The Pacific War Uncensored, Harold Guard with John Tring

Harold Guard was a British journalist who was working in Singapore when the Japanese invaded Malaya. He reported on their advance towards Singapore and on most of the battle for Singapore Island, before making his escape to Java just before the fall of the city. He was then forced to escape from Java after the Japanese invaded that island, reaching safety in Australia. From there he reported on the Allied fight-back. This wasn't a passive role, for he took part in 22 US bombing raids and on the ground during one of the amphibious landings on the northern coast of New Guinea.

His was one of a number of voices that pointed out the weakness of the defences of Singapore, an attitude that got him into trouble with the local authorities, at least until he was proved right. He also remained convinced that the defenders of Malaya and Singapore did a much better job that is generally the case, and that their defeat was due to a lack of resources.

Guard is an observant trained witness to these momentous events, and his opinions, recorded on tape between 1976 and his death ten years later, provide an up-close and personal view of the period of Japanese triumphs and the Allied fight-back. His account of the difficulties of journalism in the war years is also fascinating, both in his dealings with officialdom and the censors and in his dealings with his employers at the United Press, who eventually moved him away from the battle zone to India. The memoirs continue into the post-war world, so we are also given a glimpse into the early days of Cold War.

This is a fascinating memoir, and provides a very valuable first-hand account of some key moments during the war in the Far East. Highly recommended.

Chapters
1 - Osiris
2 - A New Life
3 - Pre-War Hong Kong
4 - Singapore Defence
5 - Attack on Singapore
6 - Up Country in Malaya
7 - Escape From Singapore
8 - Escape from Java
9 - Australia
10 - Townsville
11 - Port Moresby
12 - The Northern Territories
13 - Wau (Wow)
14 - The War in New Guinea, Hans Christian Anderson and General MacArthur
15 - Lae Landings
16 - Passage to India
17 - The Fortune Teller was Right
18 - Returning Home
19 - Post-War
Epilogue

Author: Harold Guard with John Tring
Edition: Hardcover
Pages: 288
Publisher: Casemate
Year: 2011



The Pacific War Uncensored

A WWII reporter's dangerous adventures in Singapore, Malaya, Java, and more.

Harold Guard became a war correspondent by chance, after he'd been invalided out of the navy following a submarine accident. Thereafter, working for United Press, he gained a front row seat to many of the most dramatic battles and events of the century.
In March 1942 Guard arrived in Australia, having narrowly escaped from Japanese forces invading Singapore and Java. His dispatches from that disastrous front prompted one observer to comment on "the crisis days when everybody except Harold Guard was trying to hush up the real situation." At the time he was acclaimed by the Australian press as one of the top four newspapermen covering the war in the Pacific.
Over the next three years Guard was to have many more adventures reporting on the Pacific War, including firsthand experience of flying with the US Air Force on twenty-two bombing missions, camping with Allied forces in the deadly jungles of New Guinea, and taking part in attacks from amphibious landing craft on enemy occupied territory. He also traveled into the undeveloped areas of Australia's northern territories to report on the construction of the air bases that were being built in preparation for defending the country against the advancing Japanese.
What made Harold Guard's achievements even more remarkable was that he was disabled, and had to walk with a stiff right leg due to his navy injury. Despite this he often reported from perilous situations at the front line, which gained him considerable notoriety within the newspaper world. Guard endeavored to give honest accounts, and this often brought him into conflict with the military censors. In this book, the full story of Guard's experiences and observations during the Pacific War have been reconstructed with the help of his dispatches, private correspondence, telegrams, and audio accounts. No longer subject to censorship, the starkly honest perceptions of how the Allies nearly failed and at last finally won the war can now be told.


A WWII reporter’s dangerous adventures in Singapore, Malaya, Java, and more.

Harold Guard became a war correspondent by chance after he’d been invalided out of the navy following a submarine accident. Thereafter, working for United Press, he gained a front-row seat to many of the most dramatic battles and events of the century.

In March 1942, Guard arrived in Australia, having narrowly escaped from Japanese forces invading Singapore and Java. His dispatches from that disastrous front prompted one observer to comment on “the crisis days when everybody except Harold Guard was trying to hush up the real situation.” At the time, he was acclaimed by the Australian press as one of the top four newspapermen covering the war in the Pacific.

Over the next three years, Guard was to have many more adventures reporting on the Pacific War, including firsthand experience flying with the US Air Force on twenty-two bombing missions, camping with Allied forces in the deadly jungles of New Guinea, and taking part in attacks from amphibious landing craft on enemy occupied territory. He also traveled into the undeveloped areas of Australia’s northern territories to report on the construction of air bases being built in preparation for defending the country against the advancing Japanese.

What made Harold Guard’s achievements even more remarkable was that he was disabled and had to walk with a stiff right leg due to his navy injury. Despite this, he often reported from perilous situations at the front line, which gained him considerable notoriety within the newspaper world. Guard endeavored to give honest accounts, and this often brought him into conflict with the military censors. In this book, the full story of Guard’s experiences and observations during the Pacific War have been reconstructed with the help of his dispatches, private correspondence, telegrams, and audio accounts. No longer subject to censorship, the starkly honest perceptions of how the Allies nearly failed and, at last, finally won the war can now be told.


Community Reviews

When I first received my review copy I thought, oh great a memoir written by the grandson. As I started reading, the book was a pleasant surprise. It is well written, entertaining, and insightful. I found myself not wanting to put the book down. It is the story of Harold Guard. He’s from England. This wonderful book gives use the story of his life with the focus on his role as a war correspondent with the United Press International.

Mr. Guard led an interesting life. The story begins with him in When I first received my review copy I thought, oh great a memoir written by the grandson. As I started reading, the book was a pleasant surprise. It is well written, entertaining, and insightful. I found myself not wanting to put the book down. It is the story of Harold Guard. He’s from England. This wonderful book gives use the story of his life with the focus on his role as a war correspondent with the United Press International.

Mr. Guard led an interesting life. The story begins with him in the British Navy serving on submarines. We experience the accident that shatters his right knee joint. The right knee joint is removed leaving his leg stiff. The stay at the hospital allows him to get reacquainted with a Queen’s Army schoolmistress, Marie Guppy. He had met her originally in Hong Kong during his Navy travels. She becomes Mrs. Harold Guard and they accompany each other on their many adventures over the next three decades.

After they marry, Marie has to return to Hong Kong. We get the story of their travels back to the Far East. On they arrive in Hong Kong Harold has to find work. Ultimately, because of ingenuity if starting a magazine and a financial newsletter he is offered a position of getting the United Press office started in Hong Kong. We are given a wonderful depiction of 1930s and early 1940s Hong Kong.

Because of his position with United Press, Harold Guard is an eyewitness to history reporting on many of the critical battles of the Second World War. The United Press moves Harold to Singapore where he opens their office. The coverage of Singapore, the lack of preparation of the British and local authorities, and ultimately the Japanese attack and invasion are breath taking.

Harold’s escape and evasion from the Japanese forces and decisive retreat to Java and then to Australia will keep you turning the pages. Harold’s coverage of events has made him a celebrity by the time he arrives in Australia.

The book does an excellent job of describing 1940s Australia. Credit for the role of the American engineers occurs numerous times in the book. We see this in everything from the building of roads across the Outback to the making of corduroy roads in Java. I especially enjoyed the coverage given to the common soldier and airman in Harold’s articles and in the book. He comes across as selfless. An example is when he writes the dispatches for United Press and then for the other newspaper correspondents sending the cables when he has the breaking news of the Battle of the Coral Sea. His getting to fly on missions with the United States Army Air Forces and report on them amazed me. I also chuckled when reading his account of General MacArthur. No wonder his truthful story failed to be published.

Without writing a summary of the book, I would point out that Harold’s adventures moved on to the Burma front, helping the United Press’ establishment in India. This would allow him to get back to London. We learn of the political unrest in India. A funny story during his India time was traveling back to Australia. On arrival he was treated as if he was a general when a sister airplane carrying several general had to turn back because of mechanical problems. Because of radio silence, no one knew the plan had turned back.
Harold gets back to England just as the war ends. We see his further adventures as he helps establish the United Press office in Prague. He then covers such events as establishment of the nation of Israel, Princess Elizabeth’s death, the London Olympics, the death of the British King George VI and then goes on a world tour for the Foreign Office to give an assessment of what is happening in the world.

The grandfather would be proud of the book the grandson produced. This is well written and very enjoyable. Hollywood would do good to buy the movie rights and make an action adventure movie on Harold Guard’s life. I strongly recommend the book.

"The Pacific War Uncensored: A WarCorrespondent's Unvarnished Account of the Fight Against Japan" by Harold Guard with his John Tring. The publisher is Casemate Publishers. Read and reviewed by Jimmie A. Kepler. . more


Pacific War Uncensored: A War Correspondent's Unvarnished Account of the Fight Against Japan MP3 CD – MP3 Audio, 12 July 2016

Who would not enjoy this book? Persons who care not a whit about WWII, or about memoirs, or both. For the rest of you, I heartily recommend this book. The author, Harold Guard, had intended to write his memoir years ago, but blindness overtook him. He recorded his story on a series of cassette tapes. His grandson, John Tring, edited the tapes into this book. Tring states that almost the entire book is in his grandfather's words.

Harold Guard -- that's a name few of us know today. During WWII he was a highly regarded war correspondent for the South Pacific and Southwest Pacific regions, where he became famous for his eyewitness reports of sea, air and ground battles. Working for United Press he reported on the fall of Singapore (indeed, previously, he had written warnings about Singapore officials deceiving themselves about the city's defenses). Guard made a harrowing escape from Singapore through Java (also being invaded by the Japanese) to Australia, where he became an accredited war correspondent for United Press. He wanted to gain an understanding of what was going on by observing events as close to the front lines as possible. He hitched rides on just about every type of American bomber stationed in Australia (even in the remote outback air fields). He flew twenty two bombing raids and one wild, carrier fighter flight. He also accompanied Australian and American ground troops who were slugging it out with the Japanese over the infamous, always muddy, steep-sloped Kokoda Trail in New Guinea. Elsewhere, he even fixed a failed steering mechanism on a Landing Craft Tank (LCT) during an amphibious assault of Lae, New Guinea, under heavy Japanese fire. He is also known for his interview of General MacArthur, which did not get past the censors.

So who is Harold Guard? At age sixteen in 1916, he joined the British navy and received training as a submarine engineer. That was the extent of his formal education. But his ability to learn and to apply what he learned was truly astounding. The early chapters of this book clearly show the making of a "self made" man. His navy career seemed bright and full of promise until an explosion aboard a submarine shattered his knee. Medical operations fused the bones of his leg together so that he had a straight leg -- no knee flex at all (now go back to previous paragraph and note his activities!). The navy discharged him as an invalid, and he gained employment in London as a building engineer. Newly married to the woman who had been his nurse in the hospital, he followed her to her new assignment in Hong Kong in 1931. There he took on a number of jobs and suceeded at all of them. Working as a telephone operator for a Hong Kong stock broker, he began writing about trends in stock trading, complete with charts -- and that got him a job with United Press in Hong Kong and later Singapore. So began his career in news reporting. All this is a story in itself -- mix in the coming Pacific war.

One last note: Guard's view of news reporting is to go where the story is and then try to get at the truth of the matter. I wonder if today's entertainment-driven cable news knows about that premise.

When I first received my review copy I thought, oh great a memoir written by the grandson. As I started reading, the book was a pleasant surprise. It is well written, entertaining, and insightful. I found myself not wanting to put the book down. It is the story of Harold Guard. He's from England. This wonderful book gives use the story of his life with the focus on his role as a war correspondent with the United Press International.

Mr. Guard led an interesting life. The story begins with him in the British Navy serving on submarines. We experience the accident that shatters his right knee joint. The right knee joint is removed leaving his leg stiff. The stay at the hospital allows him to get reacquainted with a Queen's Army schoolmistress, Marie Guppy. He had met her originally in Hong Kong during his Navy travels. She becomes Mrs. Harold Guard and they accompany each other on their many adventures over the next three decades.

After they marry, Marie has to return to Hong Kong. We get the story of their travels back to the Far East. On they arrive in Hong Kong Harold has to find work. Ultimately, because of ingenuity if starting a magazine and a financial newsletter he is offered a position of getting the United Press office started in Hong Kong. We are given a wonderful depiction of 1930s and early 1940s Hong Kong.

Because of his position with United Press, Harold Guard is an eyewitness to history reporting on many of the critical battles of the Second World War. The United Press moves Harold to Singapore where he opens their office. The coverage of Singapore, the lack of preparation of the British and local authorities, and ultimately the Japanese attack and invasion are breath taking.

Harold's escape and evasion from the Japanese forces and decisive retreat to Java and then to Australia will keep you turning the pages. Harold's coverage of events has made him a celebrity by the time he arrives in Australia.

The book does an excellent job of describing 1940s Australia. Credit for the role of the American engineers occurs numerous times in the book. We see this in everything from the building of roads across the Outback to the making of corduroy roads in Java. I especially enjoyed the coverage given to the common soldier and airman in Harold's articles and in the book. He comes across as selfless. An example is when he writes the dispatches for United Press and then for the other newspaper correspondents sending the cables when he has the breaking news of the Battle of the Coral Sea. His getting to fly on missions with the United States Army Air Forces and report on them amazed me. I also chuckled when reading his account of General MacArthur. No wonder his truthful story failed to be published.

Without writing a summary of the book, I would point out that Harold's adventures moved on to the Burma front, helping the United Press' establishment in India. This would allow him to get back to London. We learn of the political unrest in India. A funny story during his India time was traveling back to Australia. On arrival he was treated as if he was a general when a sister airplane carrying several general had to turn back because of mechanical problems. Because of radio silence, no one knew the plan had turned back.
Harold gets back to England just as the war ends. We see his further adventures as he helps establish the United Press office in Prague. He then covers such events as establishment of the nation of Israel, Princess Elizabeth's death, the London Olympics, the death of the British King George VI and then goes on a world tour for the Foreign Office to give an assessment of what is happening in the world.

The grandfather would be proud of the book the grandson produced. This is well written and very enjoyable. Hollywood would do good to buy the movie rights and make and action adventure movie on Harold Guard's life. I strongly recommend the book.


The Pacific War Uncensored, Harold Guard with John Tring - History

Harold Guard became a war correspondent quite by chance, after he had been invalided out of the navy following a submarine accident. Thereafter, working for United Press, he gained a front row seat to many of the most dramatic battles and events of the century.

In March 1942 Guard arrived in Australia, having narrowly escaped from Japanese forces invading Singapore and Java. His dispatches from that disastrous front prompted one observer to comment on &ldquothe crisis days when everybody except Harold Guard was trying to hush up the real situation.&rdquo At the time he was acclaimed by the Australian press as being one of the top four newspapermen covering the war in the Pacific.

Over the next three years Guard was to have many more adventures reporting on the Pacific War, including firsthand experience of flying with the US Air Force on 22 bombing missions, camping with Allied forces in the deadly jungles of New Guinea, and taking part in attacks from amphibious landing craft on enemy occupied territory. He also traveled into the undeveloped areas of Australia&rsquos northern territories to report on the construction of the air bases that were being built in preparation for defending the country against the advancing Japanese.

What made Harold Guard&rsquos achievements even more remarkable was that he was disabled, and had to walk with a stiff right leg due to his navy injury. Despite this he often reported from perilous situations at the front line, which gained him considerable notoriety within the newspaper world. Harold Guard always endeavored to give an honest account of what was happening in the war, and this often brought him into conflict with the military censors. He also courted controversy on returning to Britain, when he highlighted the deficiencies of the defensive strategy used by the British government in defending Singapore.

Harold Guard passed away in 1986 however thanks to years of work by his grandson John Tring in assembling his dispatches, private correspondence, telegrams, and audio accounts, the full story of Guard&rsquos experiences and observations during the Pacific War have been constructed. No longer subject to censorship, the starkly honest perceptions of how the Allies nearly failed and at last finally won the war can now be told.

About The Author

Harold Guard became a war correspondent quite by chance, after he had been invalided out of the navy following a submarine accident. Thereafter, working for United Press, he gained a front row seat to many of the most dramatic battles and events of the century.Harold Guard passed away in 1986 however thanks to years of work by his grandson John Tring in assembling his dispatches, private correspondence, telegrams, and audio accounts, the full story of Guard’s experiences and observations during the Pacific War have been constructed. No longer subject to censorship, the starkly honest perceptions of how the Allies nearly failed and at last finally won the war can now be told.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1: Osiris
CHAPTER 2: A New Life
CHAPTER 3: Pre-War Hong Kong
CHAPTER 4: Singapore Defence
CHAPTER 5: Attack on Singapore
CHAPTER 6: Up Country in Malaya
CHAPTER 7: Escape from Singapore
CHAPTER 8: Escape from Java
CHAPTER 9: Australia
CHAPTER 10: Townsville
CHAPTER 11: Port Moresby
CHAPTER 12: The Northern Territories
CHAPTER 13: Wau (Wow)
CHAPTER 14: The War in New Guinea, Hans Christian Anderson and General MacArthur
CHAPTER 15: Lae Landings
CHAPTER 16: Passage to India
CHAPTER 17: The Fortune Teller Was Right
CHAPTER 18: Returning Home
CHAPTER 19: Post-War

REVIEWS

&ldquoLife under gathering war clouds is interesting. Some of the insights are not well known even today. This book is Mr. Guard&rsquos personal recollections and experiences. His bias and pros and cons concerning people and events make this work all the more fascinating. &hellipStories like this, from personal recollections, are a great addition to the official histories we have had for the first several post-war decades. They shed light on some events and support others. I highly recommend this book.

- Aeroscale

&ldquo&hellip well written, entertaining, and insightful. I found myself not wanting to put the book down. very enjoyable. Hollywood would do good to buy the movie rights and make an action adventure movie on Harold Guard&rsquos life. I strongly recommend the book.&rdquo

- Kepler’s Military History

PACIFIC WAR UNCENSORED, THE: A War Correspondent's Unvarnished Account of the Fight Against Japan

Title: PACIFIC WAR UNCENSORED, THE: A War .

Publisher: Casemate

Publication Date: 2011

Binding: Hardcover

Book Condition: Very Good

Dust Jacket Condition: Includes dust jacket.

Harold Guard became a war correspondent quite by chance, after he had been invalided out of the navy following a submarine accident. Thereafter, working for United Press, he gained a front row seat to many of the most dramatic battles and events of the century.

In March 1942 Guard arrived in Australia, having narrowly escaped from Japanese forces invading Singapore and Java. His dispatches from that disastrous front prompted one observer to comment on “the crisis days when everybody except Harold Guard was trying to hush up the real situation.” At the time he was acclaimed by the Australian press as being one of the top four newspapermen covering the war in the Pacific.

Over the next three years Guard was to have many more adventures reporting on the Pacific War, including firsthand experience of flying with the US Air Force on 22 bombing missions, camping with Allied forces in the deadly jungles of New Guinea, and taking part in attacks from amphibious landing craft on enemy occupied territory. He also traveled into the undeveloped areas of Australia’s northern territories to report on the construction of the air bases that were being built in preparation for defending the country against the advancing Japanese.

What made Harold Guard’s achievements even more remarkable was that he was disabled, and had to walk with a stiff right leg due to his navy injury. Despite this he often reported from perilous situations at the front line, which gained him considerable notoriety within the newspaper world. Harold Guard always endeavored to give an honest account of what was happening in the war, and this often brought him into conflict with the military censors. He also courted controversy on returning to Britain, when he highlighted the deficiencies of the defensive strategy used by the British government in defending Singapore.

Harold Guard passed away in 1986 however thanks to years of work by his grandson John Tring in assembling his dispatches, private correspondence, telegrams, and audio accounts, the full story of Guard’s experiences and observations during the Pacific War have been constructed. No longer subject to censorship, the starkly honest perceptions of how the Allies nearly failed and at last finally won the war can now be told.

CHAPTER 1: Osiris
CHAPTER 2: A New Life
CHAPTER 3: Pre-War Hong Kong
CHAPTER 4: Singapore Defence
CHAPTER 5: Attack on Singapore
CHAPTER 6: Up Country in Malaya
CHAPTER 7: Escape from Singapore
CHAPTER 8: Escape from Java
CHAPTER 9: Australia
CHAPTER 10: Townsville
CHAPTER 11: Port Moresby
CHAPTER 12: The Northern Territories
CHAPTER 13: Wau (Wow)
CHAPTER 14: The War in New Guinea, Hans Christian Anderson and General MacArthur
CHAPTER 15: Lae Landings
CHAPTER 16: Passage to India
CHAPTER 17: The Fortune Teller Was Right
CHAPTER 18: Returning Home
CHAPTER 19: Post-War


Rakuten Kobo

Harold Guard became a war correspondent by chance after he’d been invalided out of the navy following a submarine accident. Thereafter, working for United Press, he gained a front-row seat to many of the most dramatic battles and events of the century.

In March 1942, Guard arrived in Australia, having narrowly escaped from Japanese forces invading Singapore and Java. His dispatches from that disastrous front prompted one observer to comment on “the crisis days when everybody except Harold Guard was trying to hush up the real situation.” At the time, he was acclaimed by the Australian press as one of the top four newspapermen covering the war in the Pacific.

Over the next three years, Guard was to have many more adventures reporting on the Pacific War, including firsthand experience flying with the US Air Force on twenty-two bombing missions, camping with Allied forces in the deadly jungles of New Guinea, and taking part in attacks from amphibious landing craft on enemy occupied territory. He also traveled into the undeveloped areas of Australia’s northern territories to report on the construction of air bases being built in preparation for defending the country against the advancing Japanese.

What made Harold Guard’s achievements even more remarkable was that he was disabled and had to walk with a stiff right leg due to his navy injury. Despite this, he often reported from perilous situations at the front line, which gained him considerable notoriety within the newspaper world. Guard endeavored to give honest accounts, and this often brought him into conflict with the military censors. In this book, the full story of Guard’s experiences and observations during the Pacific War have been reconstructed with the help of his dispatches, private correspondence, telegrams, and audio accounts. No longer subject to censorship, the starkly honest perceptions of how the Allies nearly failed and, at last, finally won the war can now be told.


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FREE Delivery on all Orders!

FREE, Fast, Contact-Free Delivery on ALL Orders 90 Point Refurbished Quality Check Free Contact-Free Delivery on ALL Orders 90 Point Refurbished Quality Check

If you’re looking for something new to listen to, watch or play, look no further than the musicMagpie Store. We sell over half a million new and used CDs, DVDs, Blu-Rays, Games and Vinyl, spanning all kinds of genres and consoles, with prices starting from just £1.09! We also sell a wide range of refurbished Mobile Phones and Tech from major brands like Apple, Samsung, Sony, Microsoft and much more. With a 12 month quality warranty, you can save with total confidence.

To top it all off, every order comes with FREE delivery whether you’re buying a couple of CDs, a new phone or an entire DVD collection. So if you want to save big on entertainment and electronics, check out the musicMagpie Store.

Entertainment Magpie Limited t/a Music Magpie is registered in England and Wales No 06277562.

Entertainment Magpie Limited t/a Music Magpie acts as a broker and offers credit from Klarna Bank AB (publ), Sveavägen 46, 111 34 Stockholm, Sweden.

Finance provided by PayPal Credit. Terms and conditions apply. Credit subject to status, UK residents only, Entertainment Magpie Limited t/a Music Magpie acts as a broker and offers finance from a restricted range of finance providers, PayPal Credit is a trading name of PayPal (Europe) S.à.r.l et Cie, S.C.A. 22-24 Boulevard Royal L-2449, Luxembourg.

Entertainment Magpie Limited t/a Music Magpie is authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority FRN 775278. Credit subject to age and status.


Watch the video: The Pacific War in color #2 Shockwaves. (January 2022).