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The splendor of the Borgias, Volume 2 (H. Pigaillem)
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The splendor of the Borgias, Volume 2 (H. Pigaillem)

Gone are the Borgias ... well no! They do not die out on Lucretia's death in 1519 as many believe! Henri Pigaillem, in his second volume "Les Soupers du Vatican", brilliantly tells us the story of the children and grandchildren of César and Lucretia Borgia, who became Duchess of Este and Ferrara.

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100 years war

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Mao and Kennedy in comics

The now famous "They Made History" collection features two new volumes dealing with two key figures in contemporary history: US President John Kennedy (1961-1963 term) and Chinese Communist leader Mao Zedong . Through these two great figures, readers plunge back to the heart of the ideological clash between Capitalism and Communism that crystallized at the end of World War II.
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Comédie Française - History and famous people

The Comédie Française was born more than three centuries ago, with the motto "Simul et Singulis" - to be together and to be yourself - with a beehive and bees as its emblem. Directed by Molière, all the activities and life of this troop were initially noted by La Grange (1635-1692), a faithful friend of Molière.
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The invention of the tire (1887): history of the tire

The invention of the tire dates back to the 19th century. It was the Frenchman Charles Dietz who, in 1830, was the first to dress the wheels of certain vehicles with a rubber band, placed between the wheel and the metal rim. Other bandages of the same material appear over the decades, until it comes to tubular bandages wrapped around a piano wire.
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The women of Francis I

Mother, sister, wives, mistresses, there are many women who have surrounded Francis I with the same adoration, magnificent king in his court like a sultan in his Harem, devoting their entire life to him. He accepted their donation as a due, like a child spoiled by fortune. Louise of Savoy, Marguerite of Navarre, Anne de Pisseleu, Claude of France and especially Françoise de Châteaubriant, all exceptional women of a flamboyant and eventful reign.
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The Tower of Babel (Valckenborch)

The Tower of Babel, a major work of the Flemish painter Lucas van Valckenborch, is the symbol of the pride of man who claims to be able to do without God. This theme, borrowed from utopia and vanity, literally fascinated many artists of the 16th and 17th centuries. Valckenborch moreover painted at least half a dozen (Munich, Koblenz, Mainz, etc.
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300, when cinema remakes history

Between cinema and history, the film 300 has found its fans but also its detractors. In this Hollywood blockbuster, Leonidas and his 300 bodybuilder Spartans face the famous battle of Thermopylae in Xerxes and Persians straight out of hell. The film takes a lot of liberties with the story, which is hardly surprising for a fiction.
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History of the Royal Stables of Versailles

The Academy of Equestrian Show installed in the Grande Ecurie of the Palace of Versailles, offers breathtaking shows, against a backdrop of baroque music from the time of Versailles. All this thanks to Louis XIV who built the Royal Stables around 1680. Let us return to this showcase of the horses of the kingdom.
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Napoleon's soldiers: an army of marchers

From 1792 to 1815, France experienced more than twenty years of almost uninterrupted wars. In this context, the daily life of Napoleon's soldier obviously took on particular importance and relief. Over a million soldiers had to be recruited, clothed, fed and armed. How did the Emperor go about overcoming the difficulties encountered?
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The Struggle for the Frontier States: Maryland

In the spring of 1861, as the armies of both camps were organizing, the secession of four new states, and the uncertainty surrounding the attitude of three others, posed a new strategic problem for the leaders of the two belligerents. For the South, the first urgency is to integrate the new states into the Confederation, and to ensure the defense of a territory which has become excessively large in relation to its military means.
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Traveling during the First Crusade

The notion of travel, as we understand it today as the movement of a person to a distant region, is an original phenomenon in the Middle Ages. By this we mean those who take the via, the land route to move from one place to another. We prefer to speak of peregrini, of & 39; & 39; pilgrim & 39; & 39; to qualify the one who takes part in the Crusade, or Hierosolymitani, common name given to those who go to Jerusalem.
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Ephemeris of November 10

1928: Hirohito becomes Emperor of Japan. 1775: The American Congress at war with the British decides to create the Marine Corps. 1567: Second religious war: Protestants and Catholics wage an indecisive battle in Saint-Denis. The Constable of Montmorency is killed. 1555: French, under the leadership of Admiral Villegagnon land in Brazil, installing an ephemeral colony, which will become under Portuguese control, Rio de Janeiro.
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The Battle of Pea Ridge (March 6-8, 1862)

Despite the size of the state and its underdeveloped character, and given the small number of troops engaged on both sides, military operations did not weaken much in Missouri. In the fall of 1861, and then the following winter, major troop movements were carried out. However, they did not lead to decisive battles until late.
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History of Brittany (B. Merdrignac)

From the Paleolithic to contemporary times, the "History of Brittany" takes us through several centuries of history through a richly illustrated and well documented book. Something to please fans of the genre, as well as the simple curious. The author Bernard Merdrignac (1947-2013) was a medievalist historian, specialist of the religious fact in the medieval West.
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Dreyfus Affair - Trial and History

June 3, 1899 in Rennes, a former captain of the French army is about to be tried a second time for acts of treason… France sinks into the throes of the Dreyfus Affair. It all started on October 15, 1894, when the artillery captain Alfred Dreyfus, of Alsatian and Jewish origin, was arrested at the Ministry of War.
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Dupes Day (November 11, 1630)

A play… a melodrama… three actors, three acts, three days! The cries and tears of the first, the anguish of the second ... and the triumph of the third! The main day of November 11, 1630, called the Day of Dupes by Guillaume de Bautru, Count of Serrant, was memorable in the history of France.
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The invention of the cannon (1313)

The Canon as we know it was an invention developed in Europe in 1313 by Berthold Schwarz (a German monk), three centuries after the invention of gunpowder by the Chinese. Later, a certain Bonaparte would have the audacity to exploit the cannon as a mobile support force for infantry attacks and make it one of his centerpieces in his conquest of Europe.
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Battle of Britain (July 1940 - May 1941)

July 1940: The Battle of Britain will succeed the Battle of France, lost a month earlier. France is occupied while in London General De Gaulle tries to mobilize resistance. Hitler, free in the East thanks to the German-Soviet Pact, now faces only England. But it is that of Winston Churchill and not of Chamberlain that he decides to bring to his knees by an unprecedented bombardment, which will reveal British courage and make the Royal Air Force a legendary place.
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Battle of Chemin des Dames (April-October 1917)

Named in honor of Adélaïde and Victoire, daughters of Louis XV, the "Chemin des Dames", also called the "battle of the Aisne" or "Nivelle offensive", was above all a huge battle of the First World War. Mobilizing a million men to break through the German lines, it quickly turned into a tragic and deadly vein.
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The Battle of Antietam, September 17, 1862

Wednesday September 17, 1862 begins in the relative tranquility of a misty night. For those who have already fought the night before, it is not easy, though. Truman Seymour's men, like their opponents, bivouacked where they were fighting when darkness surprised them, in the Eastern Woods.
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